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Managing Growth and Development

WELSH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE

View Comments (1) 7.1.1 Context

  • National planning policy advises that local planning authorities should consider whether they have communities where the use of the Welsh language is part of the social fabric, and where this is so, it is considered appropriate that this be taken into account in the formulation of land use policies
  • Promoting the Welsh language and culture is one of the principles that is central to the Single Integrated Plan

No Comments 7.1.2 Introduction

The Welsh language plays an important role in the social, cultural and economic life of the Plan area's residents and visitors. In 2001, 60% and 69% of Anglesey and Gwynedd's (County) population respectively were Welsh speakers. The use of the language varies in communities. The first tranche of information released from the 2011 Census about the Welsh language reveals lower levels of Welsh speakers in both Counties: 57% and 65% in Anglesey and Gwynedd, respectively.

No Comments 7.1.3 Where development is proposed, consideration must be given to the enhancement and protection of the language and culture. Strategic Policy PS1 sets the context for the assessment of the potential impact of proposals upon the language and culture and will also inform the scale and location of new development as proposed within the settlement strategy.

View Comments (19) STRATEGIC POLICY PS1 WELSH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE

The Councils will promote and support the use of the Welsh Language in the Plan area. This will be achieved by:

1. Using appropriate mechanisms to ensure that suitable measures that mitigate negative impacts are provided or a contribution is made towards them;


2. Refusing proposals that due to its size, scale or its location, would cause significant harm to the character and language balance of a community;

3. Encouraging all signage by public bodies and by commercial and business companies to be bilingual;


4. Encouraging the use of Welsh place names for new developments, house and street names.

View Comments (2) 7.1.4 The Welsh Language will be promoted through different policies within the Plan. The range of opportunities provided by the strategic and detailed policies, including a variety of different dwelling types, local employment growth and protecting and enhancing the cultural heritage will contribute towards improving the vitality of the Welsh language. Supplementary Planning Guidance will be published to provide further advice on the matter.

INFRASTRUCTURE AND DEVELOPER CONTRIBUTIONS

View Comments (2) 7.1.5 Context

  • New development often requires significant infrastructure to sustain it
  • National policy requires a local approach to developer contributions
  • It is important to provide a clear indication of requirements to provide greater developer certainty
  • Local planning authorities will need to balance the need for some infrastructure against site viability

No Comments 7.1.6 Introduction

A planning obligation (Section 106 Agreement) is a binding agreement entered into between a Local Planning Authority and a developer/landowner or the offer of a specific undertaking by a landowner. Such an obligation may require the developer/ landowner to carry out certain works, or to provide, or contribute to the provision of measures to mitigate the negative impacts of their development. CIL Regulation 122 (2) states that:


"A planning obligation may only constitute a reason for granting planning permission for development if the obligation is:

  • necessary to make the development acceptable in planning terms;
  • directly related to the development; and,
  • fairly and reasonably related in scale and kind to the development."

View Comments (1) 7.1.7 A new planning charge came into force on 6 April 2010 through the Community Infrastructure Levy Regulations 2010. These Regulations allow local authorities in England and Wales to raise funds from developers undertaking new building projects in their area. The money can be used to fund a wide range of infrastructure that is needed as a result of development. This includes transport schemes, flood defences, schools, hospitals and other health and social care facilities, parks, green spaces and leisure centres.

View Comments (1) 7.1.8 After the 6th April 2015 only 5 contributions from section 106 agreements, since 6th April 2010, can be included within a fund for sharing resources, for example contribution towards play areas from a number of developments within a settlement.

View Comments (2) 7.1.9 The Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) is a voluntary mechanism. It was designed to supersede the present section 106 system. However, evidence is required to show that the market is viable to allow for this. The Plan intends to allow contributions through Section 106 Agreements where the Regulations continue to allow this (see paragraph above). The Councils are investigating the possibility of introducing a CIL, by having regard to the impact upon viability of development. The CIL will be subject to a separate process and documents to the Plan. Information will be gathered upon the costs of preparing strategic infrastructure, the different sources to pay for the infrastructure and viability of sites. Discussions will also be held with other developers and stakeholders who have an interest and information about the area.

View Comments (5) STRATEGIC POLICY PS2 INFRASTRUCTURE AND DEVELOPER CONTRIBUTIONS

The Councils will expect new development to ensure sufficient provision of essential infrastructure (either on-site or to service the site) is either already available or provided in a timely manner to make the proposal acceptable, by means of a planning condition or obligation. It may happen that planning obligations are required for maintenance payments in order to meet the initial costs of running services and facilities and to compensate communities for loss or damage caused by development.

Where the essential infrastructure cannot be provided on site, financial contributions will be requested, within limits allowed by legislation, to get essential investment off site. If the effect of the development is cumulative, the financial contributions may be accumulated, within legislative constraints, in order to alleviate the cumulative effect.

View Comments (11) Policy ISA1 INFRASTRUCTURE PROVISION

Proposals will only be granted where adequate infrastructure capacity exists or where it is delivered in a timely manner. Where proposals generate a directly related need for new or improved infrastructure and this is not provided by a service or infrastructure company, then this must be funded by the proposal. A financial contribution may be sought to secure improvements in infrastructure, facilities, services and related works, where they are necessary to make proposals acceptable. Where appropriate, contributions may be sought for a range of purposes, including:

1. Affordable housing
2. Sports and leisure facilities
3. Education facilities
4. Recreation and open space
5. Transport infrastructure including public transport
6. Healthcare facilities
7. Nature conservation
8. Recycling and waste facilities
9. Renewable and low carbon infrastructure
10. Cultural and community facilities
11. Broadband infrastructure
12. Regeneration
13. Flood risk management measures
14. Service and utilities infrastructure, including water supply, drainage, sewers, gas and electricity
15. Other contribution considered appropriate to the proposal

Proposals for utility services to improve infrastructure provision will be granted subject to detailed planning considerations.

View Comments (3) 7.1.10 New development will often require new or rely on existing infrastructure, services and facilities to make proposals acceptable in land use planning terms. Community benefits, related to proposed development and necessary for the grant of planning permission, can be sought from developers providing they are fairly and reasonably related in scale and kind to the proposal. It is important that the provision of infrastructure for a development site is located and designed in such a way as to minimise the impact on the natural and built environment. The amenities of local residents should also be protected. Community infrastructure contributions will be secured either through planning obligations as set out in Section 106 of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990, or through levy receipts under the Community Infrastructure Levy Regulations 2010.

View Comments (1) 7.1.11 A planning obligation is a legally binding agreement entered into between a local authority and a developer. Planning obligations are a means by which contributions can be secured to enhance the quality of a development, provide community benefits and infrastructure, and mitigate any negative impacts that may arise as a consequence of development. The type and value of planning obligations sought in connection with a planning permission will be considered on a case by case basis. Where infrastructure provision is not available or is inadequate, the Council will look to the developer to make an appropriate contribution.

View Comments (1) 7.1.12 The tests set out in Circular 13/97 and the Community infrastructure Levy Regulations 2010 will be used to determine when it would be appropriate to seek planning obligations. Supplementary Planning Guidance will be published to provide further advice on the matter.

View Comments (1) 7.1.13 In relation to infrastructure provided by the utility companies, engagement has taken place throughout the Plan preparation process to confirm the appropriateness of land allocations and to ascertain their compatibility with existing and, where known, future public investment strategies. Applicants should consult with infrastructure providers, e.g. and Dŵr Cymru/Welsh Water, Education Authorities, Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board, and undertake an assessment to determine whether there is capacity and infrastructure for their proposal prior to application.

No Comments 7.1.14 Proposals to provide infrastructure or public services, including water supply, drainage, sewers, gas, electricity and other relevant services will be granted (supported) provided they do not cause significant harm to the local environment, public amenities or public safety.

View Comments (4) POLICY ISA2 COMMUNITY FACILITIES

The Plan will help sustain and enhance community facilities by:

1. Granting the development of new community facilities, provided that:

  1. they are located within or adjoining development boundaries or they are located outside development boundaries but within clusters where the proposal will provide an essential facility to support the local community;
  2. in the case of new buildings, that the local community's needs cannot be satisfied through the dual use of existing facilities or the conversion of existing buildings;
  3. where the proposal is for a facility being relocated, it can be demonstrated that the existing site is no longer suitable for that use;
  4. the proposal is of an appropriate scale and type compared to the size, character and function of the settlement.
  5. the proposal is easily accessible by foot, cycle and public transport

The provision of new or enhanced multiuse community facilities, including the co-location of healthcare, school, library and leisure facilities in accessible locations will be encouraged.

2. Resisting the loss or change of use of an existing community facility unless:

  1. a suitable replacement facility can be provided by the developer either on or off site, and within easy and convenient access by means other than the car, or
  2. it can be demonstrated that the facility is inappropriate or surplus to requirements, or
  3. in the case of a commercially operated facility:
  • there is evidence that the current use has ceased to be financially viable, and
  • that it could not reasonably be expected to become financially viable and
  • no other suitable community use can be established, and
  • there is evidence of genuine attempts to market the facility, which have been unsuccessful.

No Comments 7.1.15 Explanation:

Policy ISA2 aims to protect existing community facilities and encourage the development of new facilities where appropriate. Local leisure and community facilities are important to the health, social, educational and cultural needs of the Plan Area, as well as its economic well-being. For the purposes of this policy, community facilities are defined as facilities used by local communities for health, leisure, social and educational purposes and include schools, libraries, leisure centres health care provision, theatres, village halls, cemeteries, places of worship, public houses, and any other facility that fulfils a role of serving the community.

No Comments 7.1.16 Where a new facility is proposed outside a settlement, it must be demonstrated that the proposed location is the best available and is accessible to the local community. Extensions to existing community facilities which are not within or well-related to a settlement will be granted where it can be demonstrated that the facility is well located to meet the needs of the community it is to serve.

No Comments 7.1.17 The loss of community facilities which provide valuable public services could have a detrimental effect on community identity and sustainability. Safeguarding such facilities will help realise the full potential for community use of existing buildings and encourage re-use of appropriate buildings when they become available. Any replacement facilities must be located to meet the needs of the same local community, and provide the same type of provision as the facility being replaced. In the case of proposals which would result in the change of use or loss of facility a report will need to be submitted with any planning application explaining why the loss or change of use is justifiable, in terms of criteria 2i - iii above.

View Comments (1) POLICY ISA3 FURTHER AND HIGHER EDUCATION DEVELOPMENT

Proposals for new facilities or extensions to existing buildings for academic and support purposes or for ancillary social, cultural or leisure activities at a further or higher education site will be granted subject to considerations of scale, location, design, amenity and transportation being acceptable. Priority should be given to re-using existing sites or buildings.

The sequential test should be adopted when determining the location of proposals for further and higher education with priority given to sites which are located:

1. Firstly, on existing further or higher education sites; or
2. Secondly, on sites which have a close association with an existing campus.

No Comments 7.1.18 Explanation:

The University of Wales, Bangor, Coleg Llandrillo Menai and Coleg Meirion - Dwyfor have numerous and extensive educational facilities within the Plan area. They make a valuable contribution to the local economy by providing employment to local people, improving skills locally and through expenditure by students. The Council is committed to improving the standards and availability of further and higher education facilities in the Plan area. New developments and enhancements to existing facilities are considered necessary to support proposed growth.

No Comments 7.1.19 Proposals to re-use previously developed land or buildings on existing further / higher education sites will be favoured over proposals for development on greenfield sites. Whilst the principle of adapting buildings for re-use is supported, not all buildings will be suitable for this. It is expected that the building in question will be suitable for its new use in terms of its form and location.

View Comments (8) POLICY ISA4 SAFEGUARDING EXISTING OPEN SPACE

Proposals that will lead to the loss of existing open space including any associated facilities which has significant recreational, amenity or wildlife value will be refused unless they conform to the following criteria:

1. There is an overall surplus of provision in the community;


2. The long term requirement for the facility has ceased;


3. Alternative provision of the same standard can be offered in an area equally accessible to the local community in question;


4. The redevelopment of only a small part of the site would allow the retention and enhancement of the facility as a recreational resource.

View Comments (1) 7.1.20 Explanation:

The term 'open space' referred to in Policy ISA4 includes the following types as described in TAN16: amenity green space, allotments, public parks and gardens, outdoors sports facilities and play provision for children and young people.

No Comments 7.1.21 These open spaces play an important part in satisfying the recreational needs of local communities and are an invaluable amenity resource. Therefore, existing open space should not be lost unless it can be clearly demonstrated that there is an over-provision of open space necessary for the community's requirements.

No Comments 7.1.22 If there is an under provision of open space in the community, the developer will need to provide an acceptable alternative site within the vicinity of the development, or within the same settlement or electoral ward area. Any alternative site should be equivalent to, or better than the existing site, and be easily accessible to the local community by sustainable transport modes.

View Comments (3) Policy ISA5 PROVISION OF OPEN SPACES IN NEW HOUSING DEVELOPMENTS

New housing proposals for 10 or more dwellings, in areas where existing open space cannot meet the needs of the proposed housing development, will be expected to provide suitable provision of open spaces in accordance with the Fields in Trust benchmark standards of 2.4 hectares per 1000 population.

In exceptional circumstances, where it is not possible to provide outdoor playing spaces as an integral part of a new housing development, the developer will be required to:

1. Provide suitable off site provision which is close to and accessible to the development in terms of walking and cycling, or, where this is not feasible/practical;
2. Contribute financially towards new or improved facilities including equipment elsewhere.

Developer contributions will be subject to a legal agreement in line with Policy ISA1.

No Comments 7.1.23 Explanation:

The provision of public open space and outdoor playing spaces (i.e. facilities for outdoor sport or outdoor equipped playgrounds for children of whatever age) are an important part of creating an attractive and appealing neighbourhood where residents and children can have safe and convenient access to outdoor playing areas. This policy aims to ensure that well designed and suitably equipped play areas are normally provided in significant housing developments in future.

No Comments 7.1.24 This policy will only be relaxed where it can be demonstrated that there is adequate suitable open space provision and outdoor playing spaces in accordance Fields in Trust (FIT) benchmark standards within close proximity to the development site. The need to provide an element of affordable housing as part of a proposal will not be sufficient reason for the relaxation of this policy.

No Comments 7.1.25 In order to inform the open space requirements on future proposals, the Fields in Trust (FIT) benchmark standard of a minimum 2.4 hectares per 1000 population should be used This consists of 1.6ha of outdoor sports facilities (of which 1.2ha are formal playing pitches) and 0.8ha of children's playing space (of which 0.25ha are equipped play spaces). Supplementary Planning Guidance will be published to provide further advice on the matter.

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY

No Comments 7.1.26 Context

  • The Government aims to secure the environmental and telecommunications infrastructure necessary to achieve sustainable development objectives, while minimising adverse impacts on the environment, health and communities.
  • The Government aims to facilitate the development of an advanced broadband telecommunications infrastructure throughout Wales and to promote an integrated approach to the provision and renewal of telecommunications infrastructure;
  • Gwynedd Council through the Digital Gwynedd project aims to establish Gwynedd as a totally digital area

View Comments (2) STRATEGIC POLICY PS3 INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY

The Councils will grant permission to infrastructure proposals that seek to extend or improve connectivity through existing and emerging communication technologies, i.e. high speed broadband, mobile phone, and development in all parts of the Plan area, subject to appropriate safeguards.

To lessen the visual impact of new overhead lines associated with such developments, especially in sensitive locations, they should be placed underground unless this impacts on other interests.

No Comments 7.1.27 Existing and national planning policy and guidance set out clear statements of national development management policy which should be referred to in formulating proposals and will be applied locally within the Plan area. These are therefore not repeated in the Plan as separate policies. In the interest of clarity these are:

Table 11: National Policies for Telecommunications

National Development Management Policies

The following paragraphs contain statements of national development management policy which should not need to be repeated as local policy in LDPs.

Paragraphs

Policy Issue

12.13.2; 12.13.3 Telecoms mast and site sharing, re-use of existing sites.
Siting of telecoms equipment.

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORT, DEVELOMENT AND ACCESSIBILITY

No Comments 7.1.28 Context

  • The Government supports a transport hierarchy in relation to new proposals that establishes priorities in such a way that, wherever possible, they are accessible in the first instance by walking and cycling, then by public transport and then finally by private motor vehicles
  • Development plan strategies and policies need to be consistent and integrated with the strategies and policies contained in Regional Transport Plans (RTPs), Road Traffic Reduction Reports, and Air Quality Management Plans and information in Strategic Noise Maps
  • The Plan area is covered by two RTPs (TRACC and TAITH), which provide the relevant framework for the Plan area
  • Active Travel Act - This Act became law on 4th November, 2013. It aims to enable more people to walk and cycle and travel by more active methods.

No Comments 7.1.29 Introduction

Transport has an important role to play in the lives of residents and visitors to the Plan area. The movement of people and goods depend on good sustainable transport links of all types. Sustainable transport will support other policy areas such as tourism, the economy, climate change, infrastructure development as well as impacting on settlement strategies.

View Comments (7) STRATEGIC POLICY PS4 SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORT, DEVELOMENTS AND ACCESSIBILITY

Development will be located so as to minimise the need to travel. The Councils will support transport improvements that maximize accessibility for all modes of transport, but particularly by foot, cycle and public transport. This will be achieved by securing convenient access via footways, cycle infrastructure and public transport where appropriate, thereby encouraging the use of these modes of travel for local journeys and reducing the need to travel by private car.

The Council will endeavour to improve accessibility and seek to change travel behaviour. This will be achieved by working with our partners to:

  1. Maintain an appropriate public transport service, recognizing alternative ways of maintaining travel opportunities;
  2. Maintain and improve stations, infrastructure and services on the main Railway Lines including access to disabled people;
  3. Improve and enhance the public footpath and cycleway network to improve safety, accessibility (including disabled people) by these modes of travel;
  4. Support schemes that will improve transport including park and ride/ share facilities for areas of employment and new development; freight transfer facilities and other rail-related improvements;
  5. Allocating or safeguarding land where appropriate to facilitate the key strategic transport schemes.

The Councils will also require key transport infrastructure elements to be delivered as part of major infrastructure development schemes:

Planning obligations or other appropriate mechanisms for development on all major development sites will be sought to mitigate their impact on the Plan area's transportation system in accordance with Strategic Policy PS2 in addition to promoting an integrated transport system.

View Comments (8) POLICY TRA1 TRANSPORT NETWORK DEVELOPMENTS

1. Improvements to Existing Infrastructure

Improvements to the existing transport network will be granted provided they conform to the following criteria:

  1. The choice of route and/or site minimises the impact on the built and natural environment, landscapes and property; and
  2. Permanent land-take is kept to the minimum that is consistent with good design and high quality landscaping; and
  3. In the case of cycle ways, park and ride schemes, roads and roadside service areas, the scheme will help to improve road safety; and
  4. In the case of new roads a full range of practicable solutions to the transport problem has been considered and road enhancement provides the optimum solution; and
  5. In the case of roadside service areas, the scheme must adjoin the strategic road network, focus primarily on serving the needs of motorists, not impede the movement of strategic traffic and in line with Strategic Policy PS12 not undermine retail provision in the Sub-Regional Centre, Urban and Local Service Centres or Villages.

2. Transfer Between Transport Modes

In order to facilitate the transfer between transport modes and help to minimise travel demand and reduce car dependency, the following proposals will be granted:

  1. Improvements to existing rail and bus interchanges, including measures to facilitate access by active travel modes and disabled people with particular access needs;
  2. Strategically located park and ride facilitates, supported by attractive, frequent and reliable bus services;
  3. Strategically located facilitates for overnight lorry parking and freight transfer;
  4. High quality driver and passenger facilities including but not limited to, seating, information, toilet facilities;
  5. Facilities for park and share in appropriate locations in or near settlements on the strategic highway network;
  6. Facilities for coach parking, taxis and passenger drop off;
  7. Facilities for interchange with water-based transport.

3. Transport Assessments

In line with Policy PCYFF1, a Transport Assessment should be provided. Where the Transport Assessment reveals the need for a Transport Implementation Strategy this will need to be secured through a planning obligation.

4. Transport Schemes

Improvements to the strategic transportation network in the plan area will be secured through safeguarding and provision of land. Schemes include:

  1. A487 Caernarfon to Bontnewydd
  2. Llangefni Link-Road
  3. A5025 Valley to Wylfa Newydd / Amlwch to Wylfa Newydd and other transport infrastructure improvements associated with new nuclear development at Wylfa Newydd including a Corporate Hub

View Comments (1) 7.1.30 Explanation:

This policy provides a criteria-based approach to evaluation of new transport schemes (accessibility, connectivity, cycle ways, park and ride schemes, ports, rail network, roads, roadside service areas, walking routes). It is important that all development mitigates its transport impact. Larger schemes may be required to prepare Transport Assessments to illustrate how the amount of trips generated will be accommodated and how accessibility to and from the site by all modes of transport will be achieved. For non-residential proposals which are likely to have significant transport implications, the submission of Travel Plans are required, the purpose of which is to promote more sustainable forms of transport in relation to the activities of a particular development e.g. encouraging reductions in car usage and increased use of public transport, cycling and walking.

View Comments (1) 7.1.31 Planning Policy Wales states that Transport Assessments (TA) are an important mechanism for setting out the scale of anticipated impacts a proposed development, or redevelopment, is likely to have. They assist in helping to anticipate the impacts of development so that they can be understood and catered for. The Welsh Government expects that all applications for developments (including changes of use) falling into the following categories will be accompanied by a TA:

Use Threshold
Table 12: Scale of Development Requiring Transport Assessment
Food Retail >1,000m2 gross floor area
Non-food Retail >1,000m2 gross floor area
Cinemas and Conference Facilities >1,000m2 gross floor area
Leisure Facilities >1,000m2 gross floor area
Business >2,500m2 gross floor area
Industry >5,000m2 gross floor area
Distribution and Warehousing >10,000m2 gross floor area
Hospitals >2,500m2 gross floor area
Higher and Further Education >2,500m2 gross floor area
Schools All new schools
Stadia >1,500 seats
Housing >100 dwellings
Hotels >1,000m2 gross floor area

No Comments 7.1.32 Planning Policy Wales also states that local planning authorities should consider requiring TAs in locally sensitive areas for proposals that fall outside of the thresholds indicated above. TAs can be required for any proposed development if the local planning authority considers that there is a justification or specific need. Wherever possible both the TA and the Design and Access Statement (where required) should use common evidence and the content of the TA should aim to complement, not duplicate, the Statement. It is expected that TAs will also provide the basis for negotiation on scheme details, including the level of parking, and measures to improve public transport access, walking and cycling. They also provide an important basis for the preparation of Travel Plans.

A487 Caernarfon to Bontnewydd

No Comments 7.1.33 The A487 Caernarfon to Bontnewydd bypass will run from the Goat roundabout (A499/A487 junction) to the Plas Menai roundabout. The length of the highway will be 9.8 km and form a western bypass to Llanwnda, Dinas and Bontnewydd before crossing the existing A487 to pass south of Caernarfon Quarry before crossing the River Seiont, passing south of the Cibyn Industrial Estate to a junction with the A4086. After crossing the B4386 the route will drop to the Plas Menai roundabout.

No Comments 7.1.34 The bypass will have two lanes in one direction, which will provide overtaking opportunities, and a single lane in the opposite direction, which prohibits overtaking.

Llangefni Link Road

No Comments 7.1.35 A new link road would link the existing Lon Bryn Cefni to the Grŵp Llandrillo-Menai site, creating a gateway roundabout to Llangefni on the A5114.

No Comments 7.1.36 Significant benefits from the new link road include improved access to the Enterprise Zone site and further support of the growth and expansive of the Grŵp Llandrillo-Menai campus. The scheme would also improve links with the A55 dual carriageway and overcome traffic constraints in the wider area of Llangefni.

New Menai Strait Crossing

View Comments (2) 7.1.37 The Britannia Bridge is the only single carriageway section of the Trans European Road Network Route E22, which presents significant problems to both regular commuter and holiday traffic.

No Comments 7.1.38 The Welsh Government conducted a public consultation on several options for a new crossing over the Menai Strait between November 2007 and February 2008. The results of the consultation showed that the favoured option was a new multi-span bridge (39%) with a single-span cable bridge being the second favourite (31%).

No Comments 7.1.39 A single-span bridge would be more expensive but would not involve work in the Menai Strait, which is a Special Area of Conservation.

No Comments 7.1.40 The Isle of Anglesey County Council has expressed its support for a new crossing over the Menai Strait.

A5025 Valley to Wylfa Newydd / Amlwch to Wylfa Newydd and other Transport Infrastructure improvements associated with new Nuclear Development at Wylfa Newydd including a Corporate Hub

View Comments (1) 7.1.41 The A5025 from Valley to Wylfa Newydd will experience a significant increase in traffic, including an increase in the number of large vehicles using the road. This route has a number of pinch points, and environmental and safety issues. Additionally, the A5/Valley junction requires consideration.

View Comments (1) 7.1.42 The four main locations on the route which require significant improvements are:

  • A5/A5205 (Valley);
  • A5025 (Llanfachraeth);
  • A5025 (Llanfaethlu);
  • A5025 (Cefn Coch).

No Comments 7.1.43 Improvements along the route from Amlwch to Wylfa Newydd may also need to be considered.

No Comments 7.1.44 The number of trips along the road network to Wylfa Newydd could be reduced by creating a Corporate Hub. Employees who do not need to attend the site could conduct meetings and training with the Corporate Hub, which could be combined with a Park and Ride facility to allow onward travel to the Wylfa Newydd site.

View Comments (1) POLICY TRA2 PARKING STANDARDS

Parking provision for all modes of transport should be in accordance with the Councils' Parking Standards.

In exceptional circumstances, proposals may be granted if it can be demonstrated that parking requirement can be satisfactorily met off-site, either by direct provision or through payment of commuted sums.

The provision of appropriate coach parking facilities to encourage bus and coach visitation the plan area's Service Centres is encouraged.

No Comments 7.1.45 There may be instances where adequate parking cannot be incorporated within a development site, but could be provided nearby. In such instances, consideration will be given to permitting development where a commuted sum is paid to enable upgrading. For example, the upgrading of existing public transport infrastructure.

No Comments 7.1.46 In regards to coach parking facilities, the importance of coach visitors is increasing and the provision of suitable parking is important to attract tourists and shoppers to visit centres that are popular with visitors and Service Centres within the Plan area. Such provision will enable the effective management of coach borne visitors and bring substantial benefits to the local economy.

View Comments (2) POLICY TRA3 SAFEGUARDING DISUSED RAILWAY LINES

Proposals that inhibit the potential of re-opening of disused or redundant railway infrastructure for railway use or for alternative transport purposes will be refused.

No Comments 7.1.47 Explanation:

National planning policy requires former transport routes to be safeguarded in recognition of their potential for other future public transport uses.

No Comments 7.1.48 Disused railway lines may be protected from inappropriate development that could prejudice their future use as part of a sustainable, integrated transportation network.

No Comments 7.1.49 In any proposed development, liaison with neighbouring landowners and local communities will be undertaken.

View Comments (5) POLICY TRA4 MANAGING TRANSPORT IMPACTS

Where necessary, safe and convenient provision will be sought in conjunction with proposals for:

1. Pedestrians, including people with prams and/or young children;
2. Disabled people with mobility impairments and particular access needs;
3. Cyclists;
4. Powered two-wheelers;
5. Public transport;
6. Vehicular access and traffic management within the site and its vicinity;
7. Car parking and servicing;
8. Coach parking; and
9. Horse-riders.

Proposals that would cause unacceptable harm to the safe and efficient operation of the highway, public transport and other movement networks including pedestrian and cycle routes, public rights of way and bridle routes, will be refused.

No Comments 7.1.50 Explanation:

The purpose of this policy is to ensure that all new proposals for which planning permission is required:

  1. Properly address the demand for travel and its impacts;
  2. Contribute to reducing reliance on the private car, in line with national planning policies and the strategic transport objectives and policies of the plan;
  3. Make satisfactory provision for access, parking and circulation, particularly by pedestrians, cyclists, public transport users and disabled people with mobility impairments and particular access needs; and
  4. Avoid unacceptable harm to safe and efficient use and operation of the road, public transport and other movement networks and routes.

No Comments 7.1.51 Measures appropriate to a particular proposal will depend on its scale, location and uses. They may include providing for and/or improving, as appropriate:

  1. The needs of disabled people with mobility impairments and particular access needs;
  2. The needs of people with prams and/or young children;
  3. Safe and convenient pedestrian access to and movement with the development, including pedestrian priority measures, lighting, security, and weather protection;
  4. Walking links to existing pedestrian routes and networks, Service Centres and Villages, open space and other community facilities; (e.g. safe routes to school) - for access and recreational purposes - and designed for use by everyone;
  5. The strategic recreational routes;
  6. Cycling links to existing cycle routes and networks, District and Local Centres, and community facilities designed for use by everyone;
  7. Secure cycle parking and changing facilities;
  8. Management of conflict between modes of access, including vehicles, pedestrians and cyclists;
  9. Public transport, including bus stops, bus lanes and interchange facilities;
  10. Safe vehicular access to the site that does not unreasonably restrict the flow of traffic on the adjoining highway network;
  11. Traffic and speed management measures; and
  12. Car and coach parking and servicing facilities in accordance with the Councils' adopted standards.

No Comments 7.1.52 In assessing the transport and access aspects of proposals the Council will be more likely to give favourable consideration to proposals, which through their design and layout, give priority to movements by sustainable travel modes and reflect the user hierarchy in the Department for Transport's 'Manual for Streets'.

7.2 LIVING SUSTAINABLY

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND CLIMATE CHANGE

No Comments 7.2.1 Context

  • The Welsh Government is committed to promoting sustainable development in Wales, and the planning system has a substantial part to play;
  • Legislation requires that local development plans contribute to the work of achieving sustainable development;
  • The purpose of the Single Integrated Plan is to promote economic, social and environmental wellbeing in Gwynedd and Anglesey;
  • Sustainable communities need to be supported by ensuring the availability of varied employment opportunities and a sufficient number of varied homes that meet the needs of the local population throughout their lives, with sufficient choice of leisure and entertainment opportunities, and where there is only a low level of crime and people feel safe;
  • The need to travel and to travel in vehicles using non-sustainable fuel should be reduced.
  • Tackling climate change is one of the Government's key objectives and Planning Policy Wales expects local planning authorities to ensure an appropriate location and pattern to development, promote reduction of car use, protect and improve biodiversity and ensure that all new development is resilient to the effects of climate change in order to alleviate and adapt to the effects of climate change;
  • Gwynedd Council and the Isle of Anglesey County Council, through their Strategic Plans, are committed to working in ways that counteract climate change;
  • Climate change considerations should be incorporated into the development of the area's spatial policies;
  • The Plan should ensure that the natural and built environment is resilient to climate change and able to adapt to it;
  • It is important to ensure that the location, scale and type of development allowed follows sustainable development principles and achieves environmental, economic and social gains for current and future generations of the Plan area

No Comments 7.2.2 The purpose of the land use planning system is to help achieve sustainable development:

Sustainable development means making sure that people can satisfy their basic needs in the present, while ensuring that future generations can also look forward to the same quality of life.

There are three interconnected 'pillars' of sustainable development, which need to be considered together to deliver development that is truly sustainable:

ECONOMIC

SOCIAL

ENVIRONMENTAL

No Comments 7.2.3 Planning Policy Wales (2014) sets out the principles underpinning the Government's approach to planning policy for sustainable development and reflect those principles that it expects all those involved in the planning system to adhere to. As the Plan is a key tool to achieve this aim an overarching strategic policy to promote sustainable development in all its forms throughout the Plan area is required. Detailed application of the objectives set out in the strategic policy is clarified in a suite of other strategic polices and in a suite of detailed policies, which will also provide more specific relevant requirements to achieve the objectives.

View Comments (2) 7.2.4 The Plan provides guidance as to how the area will contribute to national and European objectives to reduce carbon emissions, which is a principal cause of global warming. We must try to mitigate and reduce the impacts of climate change as well as adapting to the predicted impacts we are likely to see in the future. The Plan will seek to, amongst other things, support carbon management measure, including maximising renewable and low carbon energy development, support transition to a low carbon economy, support energy efficient improvements that require planning consent to existing buildings and avoid inappropriate development in areas at risk from flooding. These policies ensure that climate change is addressed as an overarching theme.

View Comments (11) STRATEGIC POLICY PS5 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

Proposals will only be permitted where it is demonstrated that they are consistent with the principles of sustainable development. All proposals are required to:

  1. Accord with national planning policy and guidance in accordance with Policy PCYFF1;
  2. Alleviate the causes of climate change and adapting to those impacts that are unavoidable in accordance with Strategic Policy PS6;
  3. Give priority to effective use of land and infrastructure, prioritizing wherever possible the reuse of previously developed land and buildings within the development boundaries of Sub Regional Centre, Urban and Local Service Centres, Villages or in the most appropriate places outside them in accordance with Strategic Policy PS15;
  4. Promote greater self-containment of Centres and Villages by contributing to balanced communities that are supported by sufficient services; cultural, arts, sporting and entertainment activities; a varied range of employment opportunities; physical and social infrastructure; and a choice of modes of travel;
  5. Protect, support and promote the use of the Welsh language in accordance with Strategic Policy PS1;
  6. Preserve and enhance the quality of the built and historic environment assets (including their setting), improving the understanding, appreciation of their social and economic contribution and sustainable use of them in accordance with Strategic Policy PS17;
  7. Protect and improve the quality of the natural environment, its landscapes and biodiversity assets, including understanding, and appreciating them for the social and economic contribution they make in accordance with Strategic Policy PS16;
  8. Reduce the effect on local resources, avoiding pollution and incorporating sustainable building principles in order to contribute to energy conservation and efficiency; using renewable energy; reducing / recycling waste; using materials from sustainable sources; and protecting soil quality;
  9. Reduce the amount of water used and wasted; reducing the effect on water resources and quality; managing flood risk and maximizing use of sustainable drainage schemes; and progressing the objectives of the Western Wales River Basin Water Management Plan.


Proposals should also where appropriate:

  1. Meet the needs of the local population throughout their lives in terms of their quality, types of tenure and affordability of housing units in accordance with Strategic Policy PS13;
  2. Promote a varied and responsive local economy that encourages investment and that will support our Centres, Villages and rural areas in accordance with Strategic Policy PS10;
  3. Support the local economy and businesses by providing opportunities for lifelong learning and skills development in accordance with Strategic Policy PS10;
  4. Reduce the need to travel and encourage the opportunities for all users to travel when required as often as possible by means of alternative modes, placing particular emphasis on walking, cycling and using public transport in accordance with Strategic Policy PS4;
  5. Promote high standards of design that make a positive contribution to the local area, accessible places, that can respond to future requirements and that reduce crime, antisocial behaviour and the fear of crime in accordance with Policy PCYFF2

View Comments (11) STRATEGIC POLICY PS6 ALLEVIATING AND ADAPTING TO THE EFFEDTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE

In order to alleviate the effects of climate change proposals will only be permitted where it is demonstrated that they have fully taken account of and responded to the following:

  1. The energy hierarchy:

  1. Reducing energy demand;
  2. Energy efficiency;
  3. Using low and zero carbon energy technologies energy wherever practical and viable and consistent with the need to engage and involve communities, protect visual amenities, the natural, built and historic environment and the landscape.


  1. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions, help to reduce waste and encourage travel other than by car.


In order to adapt to the effects of climate change, proposals will only be permitted where it is demonstrated with appropriate evidence that they have fully taken account of and responded to the following:

  1. Implementing sustainable water management measures in line with the objectives in the Western Wales River Basin Management Plan;
  2. Locating away from flood risk areas, and aim to reduce the overall risk of flooding within the Plan area and areas outside it, taking account of a 100 years and 75 years of flood risk in terms of the lifetime of residential and non-residential development, respectively, unless it can be clearly demonstrated that there is no risk or that the risk can be managed (in line with Policy PCYFF1);
  3. Be able to withstand the effects of climate change as much as possible because of its high standards of sustainable design, location, layout and sustainable building methods (in line with Policy PCYFF2);
  4. Safeguarding the best and most versatile agricultural land and promoting allotments, support opportunities for local food production and farming in order to reduce the area's contribution to food miles;
  5. Providing additional carbon management measures such as natural shelter and cooling and provide networks of green infrastructure and tree planting to compensate for CO2 emissions (in line with Policy PCYFF4);
  6. Ensuring that the ability of landscapes, environments and species to adapt to the harmful effects of climate change is not affected, and that compensatory environments are provided if necessary;
  7. Aim for the highest possible standard in terms of water efficiency and implement other measures to withstand drought, maintain the flow of water and maintain or improve the quality of water, including using sustainable drainage systems (in line with Policy PCYFF 5);
  8. Protecting soil in order to ensure that the effects of climate change can be withstood.

View Comments (13) POLICY PCYFF1 DEVELOPMENT CRITERIA

A proposal:

  1. Must comply with all relevant policies in the Plan;
  2. Must comply with national planning policy and guidance.
  3. Will be approved within defined development boundaries or the built form of identified clusters listed in the settlement framework set out in Strategic Policy PS15, subject to detailed material planning considerations;
  4. Should make the most efficient use of land, including achieving densities of a minimum of 30 housing units per hectare for residential development (unless there are local circumstances that dictate a lower density);
  5. Must provide appropriate amenity space to serve existing and future occupants;
  6. Should have regard to the generation, treatment and disposal of waste;
  7. Includes, where applicable, provision for the appropriate management and eradication of invasive species;

Additionally, planning permission will be refused where the proposed development would have an unacceptable adverse impact on:

  1. Prominent public views into, out of, or across any settlement or area of open countryside;
  2. Vehicular access to and from the highway network and public transport, cycling and pedestrian infrastructure (in line with Policy TRA4);
  3. The highway network as a result of the volume and type of traffic generated from a proposal (in line with Policy TRA4);
  4. The health, safety or amenity of occupiers of local residences, other land and property uses or characteristics of the locality due to increased activity, disturbance, vibration, noise, dust, fumes, litter, drainage, light pollution, or other forms of pollution or nuisance;
  5. The quality of ground or surface water;
  6. The best and most versatile agricultural land
  7. Land safeguarded for other uses, or impairs the development and use of adjoining land.

No Comments 7.2.5 Explanation:

Policy PCYFF1 sets out the priority criteria, not covered elsewhere in the Plan which new development will need to meet, in principle, in achieving sustainable and appropriately located development.

No Comments 7.2.6 The Welsh Government's national land use planning policies are set out in Planning Policy Wales and Minerals Planning Policy Wales supplemented by Technical Advice Notes, Circulars and Practice Guidance Notes. Authorities in Wales must have regard to national policy, including the Wales Spatial Plan, in the preparation of LDPs.

No Comments 7.2.7 A thorough scoping exercise has been undertaken of all national guidance as set out in Topic Paper 2: Policy context.

No Comments 7.2.8 Policy PCYFF1 subjects all planning applications to up-to-date national planning policy and guidance and will avoid unnecessary repetition throughout the Plan, as required by Welsh Government.

View Comments (9) POLICY PCYFF2 DESIGN AND PLACE SHAPING

All proposals will be expected to demonstrate high quality design which fully takes into account the natural, historic and built environmental context and contributes to the creation of attractive, sustainable places. Innovative and energy efficient design will be particularly encouraged.

Proposal, including extensions and alterations to existing buildings and structures will only be permitted provided they conform to all of the following criteria, where relevant:

  1. It complements and enhances the character and appearance of the site, building or area in terms of siting, appearance, scale, height, massing and elevation treatment;
  2. It respects the context of the site and its place within the local landscape, including its impact on important principal gateways into Gwynedd or into Anglesey, its effects on townscape and the local historic and cultural heritage and it takes account of the site topography and prominent skylines or ridges;
  3. It utilises materials appropriate to its surroundings and incorporates hard and soft landscaping and screening where appropriate, in line with Policy PCYFF3;
  4. Important local features (including buildings, amenity areas, green spaces and green infrastructure, biodiversity and ecological connectivity) are retained and enhanced as far as possible, in line with Policy PCYFF3;
  5. It achieves and creates attractive, safe places and public spaces, taking account of 'Secured by Design' principles (including where appropriate natural surveillance, visibility, well lit environments and areas of public movement);
  6. It plays a full role in achieving and enhancing a safe and integrated transport and communications network promoting the interests of pedestrians, cyclists and public transport and ensures linkages with the existing surrounding community;
  7. It uses resources, including land and energy, as efficiently as possible by:

  1. Making the best and most efficient use of the land available through being of appropriate density taking into account the character and appearance of the area;
  2. Precluding the reasonable use of other adjacent land because of the layout and form of the development;
  3. Developing brownfield land in preference to greenfield land where possible;
  4. Minimising building exposure while maximising solar gain.

  1. Its drainage systems are designed to limit surface water run-off and flood risk and prevent pollution;
  2. The layout and design of the development achieves inclusive design by ensuring barrier free environments, allowing access by all and making full provision for people with disabilities;
  3. Where practical, include infrastructure for modern telecommunications and information;
  4. Be legible, providing a sense of place;
  5. Encourage active frontages at ground level where development is non-residential;
  6. It helps create healthy and active environments, and considers the health and well-being of future users.

View Comments (1) 7.2.9 Explanation:

Policies addressing the design of new development will play an important role in maintaining the Plan area's high quality environment. Development needs to be carefully planned to ensure that valuable features and characteristics are protected and enhanced. Good design helps to provide a sense of place, creates or reinforces local distinctiveness, promotes community cohesiveness and social well being. The layout and design of new developments must be based on a thorough understanding of the site itself and its wider context, and seek to maximise the benefits of the sites characteristics. This will require careful consideration of the site layout. No two sites share the same landscapes, contours, relationship with surrounding buildings, street pattern, and features. The proximity of poor quality or indistinct development is not a justification for standard or poor design solutions. New development should integrate into its surroundings whilst seeking to enhance the overall character of the locality.

View Comments (1) 7.2.10 High quality design will be required for all new developments from building extensions through to major developments. This policy sets out a range of issues which all developers will need to take into account when designing each individual scheme. Proposals will need to be accompanied by appropriate information including a design and access statement when this is required to demonstrate compliance with Policy PCYFF3 In demonstrating that proposals will be sympathetic to and conserve historic buildings and historic landscapes applicants should have consideration of the requirements of Policy PS16 and Policy PCYFF1. This policy will be supported by Supplementary Planning Guidance/ Design Guides, which will set out detailed design requirements and should be referred to accordingly.

View Comments (3) POLICY PCYFF3 DESIGN AND LANDSCAPING

All proposals should integrate into their surroundings. Proposals that fail to show (in a manner appropriate to the nature, scale and location of the proposed development) how landscaping has been considered from the outset as part of the design proposal will be refused. A landscape scheme should, where relevant:

  1. Demonstrate how the proposed development conforms with the Landscape Character Area Assessment or Seascape Character Area Assessment;
  2. Demonstrate how the proposed development respects the natural contours of the landscape;
  3. Demonstrate how the proposed development respects and protects local and strategic views;
  4. Respect, retain and complement any existing positive natural features, landscapes, or other features on site;
  5. Identify trees, hedgerows, water courses and topographical features to be retained;
  6. Provide justification for circumstances where the removal/loss of existing trees, hedgerows, water courses and topographical features cannot be avoided and provides details of replacements;
  7. Provide details of any proposed new landscaping together with a phased programme of planting;
  8. Demonstrate that any proposed new planting includes plants and trees of mainly native species of local provenance and does not include any non-native invasive species;
  9. Ensure that selection of species and planting position of any trees allows for them to grow to their mature height without detriment to nearby buildings, services and other planting; and
  10. Provide permeable hard surface landscaping.

No Comments 7.2.11 Explanation:

A good landscape scheme should be an asset to the development, the local community and to the wider landscape. A landscape scheme can contribute to wide range of development situations, but will be of particular relevance to proposals involving major new development, development that is likely to have a significant visual effect or development affecting a sensitive site, locality or building.

No Comments 7.2.12 It is important to establish the requirements for the landscape scheme early in the design process so that it may contribute to the layout of the development and ensure that sufficient space is available for appropriate planting and other landscape features. The level of detail should be consistent with the nature, scale and location of the proposed development.

No Comments 7.2.13 A well-designed and executed landscape scheme can become an on-going asset to the community, contributing in a wide variety of ways. The overall aim is to achieve an environment that maximises the quality of life for people who live and work in the Plan area. This policy will be supported by Supplementary Planning Guidance/ Design Guides, which will set out detailed design requirements and should be referred to accordingly.

View Comments (6) POLICY PCYFF4 CARBON MANAGEMENT

Developers should carefully consider the most appropriate carbon management measure, or group of measures, at the conception of a development scheme. This may be an individual measure or a combination of both energy efficiency and renewable energy measures. The most appropriate technology for the site and the surrounding area should be used. In all cases, schemes should be of the highest aesthetic quality in line with Policy PCYFF2 and take into consideration the potential cumulative impacts of a combination of carbon management measures.

Potential Options for Energy Efficiency:

  1. New build construction

  1. The energy efficiency of building fabric (including the whole building envelope which includes the ceiling, walls, windows, floors, roofs, foundations and doors);
  2. Passive design (including natural lighting, passive cooling and passive solar heating).

  1. Existing buildings

  1. The upgrading of existing building elements such as doors, floors, roofs, walls and windows.

Potential Options for Renewable Energy:


Biomass, heat-pumps (air, ground and water), solar photovoltaic, solar thermal, marine, waste, water and wind, including micro-generation and free-standing apparatus.

The lists of energy efficiency and renewable energy measures are not exhaustive and are likely to evolve as technological advances are made in carbon management techniques.

Carbon management schemes will be permitted, provided that they conform to the criteria set out below.

  1. Carbon management measures must:

  1. Be sympathetic to the character and appearance of buildings and their surroundings, especially when dealing with buildings in the historic environment;
  2. Be sympathetic to the character and appearance of the surrounding landscape;
  3. Be sympathetic to nature conservation sites and wildlife.

  1. Carbon management measures must not:

  1. Compromise and/or damage the architectural/ historic integrity of buildings;
  2. Detrimentally impact upon residential amenities.

  1. Appropriate mitigation and reversibility measures will be expected to be demonstrated in schemes involving renewable technology apparatus.
  2. The application of carbon management measures must be detailed within accompanying Design and Access Statements with reference to the hierarchy approach included in Technical Advice Note 12: Design to reduce carbon and other greenhouse gas emissions associated with development.

Where appropriate, the Council will consider imposing a planning condition on consents granted for renewable technologies to ensure that all apparatus are removed at the end of their lifespan and that any affected building fabric is repaired, if necessary.

No Comments 7.2.14 Explanation:

Climate change, caused by increasing levels of greenhouse gases, poses a significant challenge of the plan area. The predicted impacts of climate change include hotter and drier summers and wetter winters. The pattern of rainfall is likely to fall in more intense storms.

No Comments 7.2.15 Whilst the Plan can have little impact on global CO2 levels, it can have a significant impact at a local level through ensuring that carbon emissions from new development are limited to the minimum practicable amount.

No Comments 7.2.16 It is important that new development responds to the challenges posed by climate change. Part of this response should involve the consideration of carbon management in new build applications, including energy efficiency and renewable energy measures.

No Comments 7.2.17 Existing buildings also have a role to play in reducing the plan area's overall carbon footprint and appropriate carbon management retrofitting measures are encouraged.

No Comments 7.2.18 Carbon management is the measurement and management of emission of the greenhouse gases covered by the Kyoto Protocol. These greenhouse gases are translated into CO2 equivalents in determining reductions in emissions.

No Comments 7.2.19 Carbon management measures, comprising of both energy efficiency and renewable technologies, are essential in helping to reduce the carbon footprint of the plan area and are strongly encouraged in both new build construction and the retrofitting of existing buildings. Schemes including carbon management measures will be supported, provided that they are of the highest standard in terms of both design and energy performance.

No Comments 7.2.20 A holistic approach to carbon management is encouraged and can be applied to a wide range of both energy efficiency and renewable technology measures. The overall energy performance of a building envelope should be taken into consideration at the start of the conception of a development scheme.

View Comments (1) POLICY PCYFF5 WATER CONSERVATION

Proposals should incorporate water conservation measures where practicable, including Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SUDS). All proposals should implement flood minimisation or mitigation measures where possible, to reduce surface water run-off and minimise its contribution to flood risk elsewhere.

Proposals greater than 1,000 m² or 10 dwellings should be accompanied by a Water Conservation Statement.

No Comments 7.2.21 Explanation:

The aim of this policy is to protect and improve water resources through increased efficiency and demand management of water, particularly in those areas where additional water resources may not be available. There are a number of ways water conservation can be achieved, including water saving devices, rainwater harvesting, and grey water recycling.

No Comments 7.2.22 The use of SUDS to manage waterflows are an important means of minimising flood risk by increasing permeable surfaces in an area which allows water to seep into the ground, thus reducing the risk of flooding. SUDS typically include swales, ponds, infiltration basins and porous surfaces and should be considered in place of conventional drainage methods where practicable. It is important that SUDS are incorporated into the design of a proposal at an early stage so that a range of techniques can be considered in order to maximise efficiency.

RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY

View Comments (1) 7.2.23 Context

  • The UK Government has set a target to supply 15% of the UK's energy from renewable energy by 2020. Planning policy at all levels should facilitate delivery of both the Welsh Government's overall Energy Policy Statement, and UK and European targets on renewable energy.

  • The Welsh Government's Energy Policy Statement (2010) identifies the sustainable renewable energy potential for a variety of different technologies as well as establishing a commitment to energy efficiency.

  • One way local planning authorities can help to achieve this is by including positive planning policies for renewable energy.

  • There are no Strategic Search Areas for commercial wind farms within the Plan area.

  • Outside Strategic Search Areas smaller community based wind farm schemes (generally less than 5MW) are encouraged.

  • Both Councils through the Anglesey Energy Island Programme and the Green Gwynedd Project support community, rural and larger scale ventures, where appropriate.

No Comments 7.2.24 Introduction

In 2012 Renewable Energy Capacity Studies were prepared for Gwynedd (county) and Anglesey to assess the potential capacity for renewable sources of energy. The purpose of the Studies was to help each Council understand the potential resources from each renewable energy technology. The Studies considered a number of on-shore technologies, e.g. onshore wind, hydropower, biomass. Off-shore resources were acknowledged in the Studies but they do not contribute to the renewable energy capacity figures of the Plan area. The Studies found that while the Plan area had a high natural resource for renewable energy, it also has a large number of high quality landscapes that reduces what is deployable. The following Strategic Policy provides a positive framework to deliver energy from renewable energy resources.

View Comments (6) POLICY PS7 RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY

The Councils will seek to ensure that the Plan area wherever feasible and viable realises its potential as a leading area for initiatives based on renewable or low carbon energy technologies by promoting:

  1. renewable energy technologies within development proposals which support energy generation from a variety of sources which include biomass, marine, waste, water, ground, solar and wind, including micro generation;
  2. free-standing renewable energy technology development

This will be achieved by:

  1. ensuring that installations in areas covered by international or national landscape designations and visible beyond their boundaries, or areas of local landscape value, in accordance with Strategic Policy PS16 do not individually or cumulatively compromise the objectives of the designations especially with regard to landscape character, visual impact and residential amenity;
  2. ensuring that installations in accordance with Strategic Policy PS16 do not individually or cumulatively compromise the objectives of international, national and local nature conservation designations;
  3. supporting installations outside designated areas provided that the installation would not cause significant demonstrable harm to landscape character, biodiversity, residential amenity, either individually or cumulatively

View Comments (81) POLICY ADN1 ON-SHORE WIND ENERGY

No Large-Scale or Very Large-Scale wind farms / wind turbines will be permitted in the Plan area.

Other on shore wind turbine proposals will be permitted subject to an assessment of their environmental and sustainability impacts:

1. Medium-Scale wind farms / wind turbines will only be granted on urban / industrial brownfield sites or when the proposal involves the repowering of existing wind farms / wind turbines.

2. Micro-Scale and Small-Scale wind turbine proposals will be granted outside the AONB, SLA and the setting of the National Park and World Heritage Site.

3. In the AONB, SLA and the setting of the National Park and World Heritage Site only Domestic-Scale wind turbine proposals well related to existing settlements / buildings will be granted.

All proposals should conform to the following criteria:

i. the proposal will not have an unacceptable impact upon visual amenity or landscape character through: the number, scale, size, design and siting of turbines and associated infrastructure especially in areas designated for their historic or landscape value;

ii. the proposal will not result in demonstrable harm to biodiversity including statutorily protected sites and species in particular bats and birds;

iii. the proposal will not result in significant harm to the safety or amenity of sensitive receptors including noise, shadow flicker and public health, and will not have an unacceptable impact on roads, rail or aviation safety;

iv. the proposal will not result in significant harm to the residential visual amenities of nearby residents;

v. the proposal will not result in unacceptable electromagnetic interference to communications installations, radar or air traffic control systems, emergency services communications, or other telecommunication systems;

vi. the proposal will not have unacceptable cumulative impacts in relation to existing wind turbines, those implemented and those which have permission, and other prominent landscape features;

vii. turbines and associated infrastructure will, at the end of the operational life of the facility, be removed and an appropriate land restoration and aftercare scheme agreed.

A proposal will be considered as falling within the category that represents the biggest type for which it qualifies.

No Comments 7.2.25 Explanation:

The greatest potential in terms of generating energy from large scale on-shore wind turbines are the Strategic Search Areas identified in TAN 8. No Strategic Search Area exists within the Môn and Gwynedd Plan area.

No Comments 7.2.26 The number of environmental designations throughout the Plan area together with the dispersed nature of the local population means careful consideration needs to be given towards the potential unacceptable impact of on-shore wind energy proposals.

No Comments 7.2.27 The Isle of Anglesey, Gwynedd and Snowdonia National Park Landscape Sensitivity and Capacity Study was commissioned to guide development such as on-shore wind energy to appropriate locations by identifying and protecting sensitive and distinct areas from inappropriate development.

No Comments 7.2.28 The indicative landscape capacity within the Sensitivity and Capacity Study, helps to identify the type of developments which could be potentially accommodated, however, this does not in itself suggest that planning applications for development in these areas will be appropriate. Other variables such as environmental designations and technical constraints, site specific siting, layout and design will need to be considered on a case by case basis.

No Comments 7.2.29 The Sensitivity and Capacity Study produces specific guidance notes for each type of development to help direct any proposed development to the most appropriate location in landscape and visual terms within each Landscape Character Area (LCA).

No Comments 7.2.30 The study concluded that in both the AONB and SLA and areas contributing to their setting, there is no capacity for wind energy development with the exception of very infrequent domestic scale development which should relate well to existing settlements/buildings. The setting of the National Park and World Heritage Site limits the capacity/scale of developments in such locations.

No Comments 7.2.31 For areas outside the AONB, SLA or the setting of a sensitive location there is potential for either Micro or Small scale developments as defined in the table below.

View Comments (1) 7.2.32 Medium scale wind farms / turbines will be limited to development on suitable urban / industrial brownfield sites or subject to suitable justification as a repowering scheme for an existing wind farm / turbine.

View Comments (7) 7.2.33 Since no Strategic Search Area has been identified within the area no Large or Very Large scale wind farms / turbines will be supported.

Wind Energy Typology

Indicative Output

(broad output category)

Supplementary Criteria

(meets one or more of the criteria)

(determines whether this typology applies or whether a larger one does)

Table 13: Wind Turbine Typology used in Policy ADN1

DOMESTIC

under 10kw

  • Single turbine applications
  • Turbine up to 15m to blade tip
  • Turbine may be roof-mounted or pole-mounted

MICRO

under 50kw

  • Single or twin turbine applications
  • Turbine up to 20m to blade tip

SMALL

under 5MW

  • Turbines up to 3 in number
  • Turbines up to 50m to blade tip
  • Viewed as a small group

MEDIUM

over 5MW and up to 25MW

  • Turbines up to 9 in number
  • Turbines up to 80 metres to blade tip
  • Viewed as a large group

LARGE

over 25MW

  • Turbines over and including 10 in number
  • Turbines up to 110 metres to blade tip
  • Viewed as a large scale wind farm

VERY LARGE

over 25MW

  • Turbines over and including 10 in number
  • Turbines over 110 metres to blade tip
  • Viewed as a very large scale wind farm

View Comments (1) 7.2.34 Encouragement is given towards community based projects in appropriate locations. The LPA will seek to negotiate Community Benefits in respect of wind farms / turbine development as a means to off-set or compensate for community impacts.

No Comments 7.2.35 An important consideration is the potential cumulative effect of wind farms / turbines, both implemented and those permitted, together with prominent landscape features. This could involve cumulative impact in relation to noise, visual, design, ecology, social, ground and surface water.

No Comments 7.2.36 Regard should be given to other policies within the plan especially those in relation to natural and historic environment. Supplementary Planning Guidance will be prepared to provide advice on the matter.

View Comments (2) 7.2.37 Guidance on the Application of Separation Distances from Residential Properties Study was commissioned by the Isle of Anglesey, Gwynedd and Snowdonia National Park to consider development such as on-shore wind energy by evaluating the suitability of introducing minimum separation distances.

View Comments (3) 7.2.38 The report concluded that minimum separation distances were not appropriate; however indicative residential visual amenity assessment trigger distances were appropriate. This means that for development within these distances to a residential property (other than the applicants/application sites own property) a residential visual amenity assessment should support the application.

Height of Proposed Wind Farm / Turbine

(to blade tip)

Residential Visual Amenity Assessment Trigger Distance

(Potential 'Very Large' Scale of Visual Impact)

Table 14: Residential Visual Amenity Assessment Trigger Distance

up to 25m

within 200m

25.01m to 50m

within 400m

50.01m to 75m

within 600m

75.01m to 100m

within 800m

over 100.01m to 150m

within 1.22km

View Comments (7) POLICY ADN2 OTHER RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES

Proposals for non-wind renewable energy technologies will be permitted within development boundaries provided they do not cause unacceptable impact to the character or amenity of the area.

Small scale proposals located outside development boundaries are required to justify the need to be sited in such a location.

Large scale proposals located outside development boundaries will be permitted in exceptional circumstances where there is an overriding need for the scheme which can be satisfactorily justified or there are specific locational circumstances for the siting of the development.

In all cases proposals should not cause an unacceptable harm to the landscape, biodiversity, archaeology and areas of historic value or their settings. In addition the potential effect of cumulative impact of renewable energy technologies should be considered.

No Comments 7.2.39 Explanation:

This policy covers a range of renewable energy technologies including solar, biomass, heat pumps, hydro power, Combined Heat and Power (CHP). This policy does not cover on-shore wind farms / turbines which are covered by policy ADN1.

No Comments 7.2.40 TAN 8 and Practice Guidance - Planning Implications of Renewable and Low Carbon Energy Development provide technical detail and definitions for understanding the characteristics of these technologies to aid assessment of proposals.

No Comments 7.2.41 In considering proposals within development boundaries, consideration will be given towards the potential impact upon the amenity of adjacent land, properties, residents and the community. Proposals will not be permitted if they have an unacceptable impact upon archaeology, conservation area or the setting of a conservation area, listed buildings or other features or areas of historical value.

No Comments 7.2.42 Small scale developments outside development boundaries should be located in close proximity to existing buildings and structures and will not cause unacceptable harm to the landscape, biodiversity, archaeology and areas of historic value or their setting.

No Comments 7.2.43 Large scale developments outside development boundaries should provide justification over the need to locate the development in the open countryside as well as not cause an unacceptable harm to the landscape, biodiversity, archaeology and areas of historic value or their setting.

No Comments 7.2.44 The potential cumulative impact of renewable energy technologies should consider unacceptable harm in relation to landscape, visual impact, noise, ecology and ground and surface water.

View Comments (1) 7.2.45 The Isle of Anglesey, Gwynedd and Snowdonia National Park Landscape Sensitivity and Capacity Study was commissioned to manage development such as field scale solar PV energy development by identifying and protecting sensitive and distinct areas from inappropriate development.

No Comments 7.2.46 The indicative landscape capacity within the Sensitivity and Capacity Study, helps to identify the type of developments which could be potentially accommodated, however, this does not in itself suggest that planning applications for development in these areas will be appropriate. Other variables such as environmental designations and technical constraints, site specific siting, layout and design will need to be considered on a case by case basis.

No Comments 7.2.47 The Sensitivity and Capacity Study produces specific guidance notes for each type of development to help direct any proposed development to the most appropriate location in landscape and visual terms within each Landscape Character Area (LCA).

No Comments 7.2.48 Regard should be given towards the Sensitivity and Capacity Study in relation to the potential scale of development that could be accommodated in the different LCA.

COASTAL CHANGE MANAGEMENT

No Comments 7.2.49 Local planning authorities should demonstrate that they have considered Shoreline Management Plans, which provide a large-scale assessment of the risks associated with coastal processes, and should provide the primary source of evidence in defining the coastal change management area and inform land allocation within it. The West of Wales Shoreline Management Plan (SMP) 2 sets a range of policies for the coastline, which are 'hold the line', 'no active intervention' or 'managed realignment', per policy epoch. The policy epochs are up to 2025, 2026 to 2055 and 2056 to 2105. A copy of the SMP 2 can be viewed at (http://www.westofwalessmp.org/content.asp?nav=23&parent_directory_id=10). Planning Policy Wales states that Local Authorities should help reduce the risk of flooding and the impact of coastal erosion by avoiding inappropriate development in vulnerable areas. A Coastal Change Management Area (CChMA) is defined where the accepted shoreline management plan policy is for 'no active intervention' or 'managed realignment' during the Plan period. Appendix 6 provides a schedule of coastal areas defined as the Coastal Change Management Area.

View Comments (9) POLICY ARNA1 COASTAL CHANGE MANAGEMENT AREA

A Coastal Change Management Area (CChMA) is identified in Appendix 6.

New Development

Proposals for new dwellings, replacement dwellings, subdivisions of existing buildings to residential use or conversion of existing buildings to residential use will be refused in the CChMA.

Relocation of Existing Permanent Dwellings in the Countryside

Proposals for the relocation of existing permanent dwellings in the countryside located in the CChMA affected by coastal erosion will be permitted provided they conform to the following criteria:

1. The development replaces a permanent dwelling which is affected or threatened by erosion within 20 years of the date of the proposal; and


2. The relocated dwelling is located an appropriate distance inland with regard to CChMA and other information in the Shoreline Management Plan and where possible it is in a location that is:


(i) in the case of an agricultural dwelling, within the farm holding or within or immediately adjacent to existing settlements


(ii) within or immediately adjacent to existing settlements close to the location from which it was displaced;


3. The existing site is either cleared and made safe;


4. The proposal should result in no detrimental impact on the landscape, townscape or biodiversity of the area.

New or Existing Non-Residential Buildings, Extensions to Existing Dwellings, Community Facilities or Services or Infrastructure

New non-residential permanent buildings not associated with an existing use or building will not be permitted in areas within the CChMA identified as being at risk from coastal change during the first indicative policy epoch up to 2025.

Proposals for the following types of development will be permitted in the CChMA, subject to a TAN 15 compliant Flood Consequences Assessment:

5. limited residential extensions that are closely related to the existing scale of the property and therefore doesn't result in a potential increase in the number of people living in the property;


6. ancillary development within the curtilage of existing dwellings that require planning permission, subject to prior consent from Natural Resources Wales if it is located within 7m of a main river;


7. redevelopment of, or extensions to, existing non-residential property or intensification of existing non-residential land uses, where it can be demonstrated that there will be no increased risk to life, nor any significant risk to property and subject to a time-limited planning permission (where appropriate);


8. (outside the indicative policy epoch up to 2025) new non-residential development:

(i) directly linked to the coastal area (e.g. beach huts, cafés, tea rooms, shops, short let holiday accommodation, camping sites, leisure activities); and


(ii) providing substantial economic and social benefits to the community; and


(iii) where it can be demonstrated that there will be no increased risk to life, nor any significant risk to property;


(iv) subject to either time-limited and/ or season-limited planning permission, as appropriate.

9. key community infrastructure, which has to be sited in the CChMA to provide the intended benefit for the wider community and there are clear plans to manage the impact of coastal change on it and the services it provides;


10. essential infrastructure, e.g. roads, provided that there are clear plans to manage the impact of coastal change on it, and that it will not have an adverse impact on rates of coastal change elsewhere.

New or Replacement Coastal Defence Schemes

Proposals for new or replacement coastal defence schemes will only be permitted where it can be demonstrated that the works are consistent with the management approach for the frontage presented in the Shoreline Management Plan, and there will be no material adverse impact on the environment.

Managing Development

Planning conditions will be applied or a planning obligation will be secured where there is a need to: limit the planned life of a development or seasonal use; remove a time-limited development or existing dwellings on cessation of use; review relevant planning permissions; manage the occupancy of a relocated dwelling.

No Comments 7.2.50 Explanation:

New residential development is not suitable in the CCHMA due to the high risk of coastal erosion and flooding. This will apply equally to proposals to change of use of other permanent buildings to residential accommodation and replacement dwellings. The type of residential use this applies to includes individual dwellings, flats above existing commercial properties, sheltered housing, student accommodation, hostels, shared housing for disabled people, nursing homes and care homes, residential education and training centres.

No Comments 7.2.51 Evidence in the Shoreline Management Plan 2 suggests that a small number of individual residential properties could be affected directly by land loss (as opposed to risks associated with flooding) or as a result of the effects of coastal erosion within the Plan period (up to 2026) or early in the second policy epoch referred to in paragraph 7.2.49 above. For the purpose of this policy a 'permanent dwelling' does not include caravans or other such moveable structures used as residential accommodation whether or not they are connected to services. To allow coastal communities to adapt to coastal change, this exception Policy facilitates the relocation and replacement of permanent dwellings to alternative locations outside the CChMA and therefore safe from coastal erosion. This policy will help ensure coastal communities remain sustainable by maintaining current levels of housing stock and reducing risk of erosion to people and property. It gives people in homes at risk of coastal erosion the same rights as others to replace their homes in line with Policy TAI7 in this Plan.

No Comments 7.2.52 Policy TAI7 sets out criteria for replacement housing in the countryside located outside the CCHMA, e.g. need to be of a similar size to the original dwelling. The same principle will be applied to proposals considered under the above Policy. This will ensure that the new dwelling continues to meet the current occupier's needs, preventing speculative development.

No Comments 7.2.53 Many extensions and alterations to houses do not require planning permission. Extensions that do require consent from the local planning authority will be permitted where it can be demonstrated that the benefits to the homeowner outweigh any increase in risk for the property in relation to the expected life of the property. However, as in the case for replacement dwellings, consideration must be given to the wellbeing of the occupants, risk to life as a result of flooding. Where extensions or replacement dwellings are considered acceptable in terms of this Policy due consideration will also be given to Policy PCYFF2 and Policy TAI7, as appropriate.

No Comments 7.2.54 Subject to the timeframe anticipated for loss of the property as a result of coastal erosion, appropriate uses could include holiday lets, community facilities, business uses, sports pitches and playing fields, sites for events such as markets and show grounds, subject to their location and accessibility. Occupants and/or owners would be expected to acknowledge that the use could be for a restricted time or season only in the risk assessment and consider the benefits against the risks associated with taking over a property with a limited lifetime.

No Comments 7.2.55 Time limited planning permissions can be used to limit the planned life-time of new development. Season limited planning permission can be used to limit the use of the site/ building to exclude the winter. These types of planning permission would enable the local planning authority to retain control over the future of the development and potential risk to people and the development itself from coastal erosion. Planning conditions will be applied where there is a need to manage the risk during the development's planned life-time and manage the removal of the development to minimise the impact on the community and environment. To achieve this, planning permissions will contain conditions relating to the review of that permission in relation to the rates of coastal change and removal of development prior to the impact of the coastal change. It will be important to monitor compliance with planning conditions on time-limited applications and season- limited applications. Planning applications to renew time-limited planning permission in the CChMA where erosion has progressed at a lower rate than predicted will be given a similar consideration to a new application for development.

7.3 ECONOMY AND REGENERATION

MAJOR INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS

View Comments (2) 7.3.1 Context

  • The UK has a legally binding target to cut emissions by 80% by 2050, with an interim target of at least 34% below base year levels by 2020 (Climate Change Act 2008)

  • A key aim of national policy is to improve the country's energy security

  • National Policy Statements establish the need for particular Nationally Significant Infrastructure Projects

  • A site adjacent to Wylfa has been selected by the UK Government for construction of a new nuclear power station

  • These known nationally significant infrastructure project could have major infrastructure implications for the Plan area in the form of new electricity transmission lines and associated development

View Comments (1) 7.3.2 Introduction


Major Infrastructure Projects are large-scale projects of national importance such as new trunk roads, airports, ports, power stations (including nuclear), electricity transmission lines, waste water treatment works and chemical works.

View Comments (1) 7.3.3 For the purpose of the Plan, Major Infrastructure Projects include those defined as Nationally Significant Infrastructure Projects in the Planning Act 2008.

View Comments (1) 7.3.4 Applications for Development Consent Orders for Nationally Significant Infrastructure Projects are examined by the Planning Inspectorate with the final decision to grant or refuse permission being made by Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change. Local authorities or other statutory bodies would be the decision maker for associated or related development not included within the main Development Consent Orders application, and national policy will be a material consideration as appropriate. Where associated or ancillary development is related to the construction or operation of a Nationally Significant Infrastructure Project, these proposals will be considered under Strategic Policies PS8 and PS9, as well as other relevant policies in the Plan.

View Comments (1) 7.3.5 The Planning Inspectorate will examine applications for new Nationally Significant Infrastructure Projects development, using the criteria on national need, benefits and impacts as set out in relevant policy. For energy infrastructure this will include the relevant National Policy Statements for Energy Infrastructure (EN-1- 6). In accordance with the National Policy Statements, the Planning Inspectorate may also consider other matters that are important and relevant to its decisions, including the existing land use development plan, this Plan when it carries sufficient weight as a material planning consideration or the Plan is adopted, the Anglesey Energy Island Programme, Destination Management Plans, Single Integrated Plan, New Nuclear Build Supplementary Planning Guidance and other relevant documents. In terms of a Development Consent Order application, a local authority's role is largely discretionary under the Act; however they will be invited to assess the adequacy of consultation and local impacts and report on these to the Planning Inspectorate in a Local Impact Report. Similarly applications may be made to other organisations such as for a jetty the Marine Management Organisation, where the Local Authority is also a statutory consultee. In Wales the local planning authorities are the determining authorities for any development associated with the Development Consent Order application, for example, construction workers accommodation, logistic centres, and park and ride facilities.

View Comments (1) 7.3.6 Through the Anglesey Energy Island Programme, the Councils' Strategic/ Corporate Plans and the Anglesey and Gwynedd Single Integrated Plan, the Councils and their partners acknowledge the likely significant economic opportunities deriving from the Wylfa Newydd Project. Chapter 3 of the Plan provides a link to the New Nuclear Build at Wylfa Supplementary Planning Guidance, which sets out the Isle of Anglesey County Council's vision in relation to this Project. This section of the Plan deals with developments that are associated with Major Projects where either the Isle of Anglesey County Council or Gwynedd Council is the determining planning authority on planning applications. It is also applicable to Nationally Significant Infrastructure Projects (such as the proposed Wylfa Newydd), where the Secretary of State makes the decision as well as other applications to other agencies (such as to the Marine Management Organisation for a wharf), where the Council is a statutory consultee.

View Comments (1) 7.3.7 Although the Councils are not the consenting authorities for Major Infrastructure Projects, it is considered important to explain their approach as a planning authority when consulted upon with a Development Consent Order application. They will also ensure that related development conform with the relevant policies and strategies included in this Plan, when it is adopted. In the period before the Plan is adopted or before weight can be given to the policies as material planning consideration the Isle of Anglesey County Council will ensure that development associated with Wylfa Newydd reflects policies included in the current Development Plan, the Stopped Unitary Development Plan, national planning policies and the New Nuclear Build at Wylfa Supplementary Planning Guidance. Whether in their role as decision makers, or as consultees for applications to other bodies the Councils will seek to secure delivery on their key priorities as set out in their Single Integrated Plan, Strategic Plans and any other relevant plan or programme.

No Comments 7.3.8 There are currently two proposed Nationally Significant Infrastructure Projects at the pre-application stage which are located within the Plan area:

i. A new nuclear power station near to Wylfa, Wylfa Newydd, proposed by Horizon Nuclear Power, as identified in the National Policy Statement for Nuclear Power Generation (EN-6);


ii. Improvements / new National Grid Transmission Lines connecting the proposed Wylfa Newydd with Pentir and beyond proposed by National Grid.

View Comments (1) 7.3.9 On the basis of the information currently available it is clear that these Projects will be significant developments with numerous significant impacts, some positive whilst others could be negative. It is anticipated that the Wylfa Newydd construction period will be 12 years, with around 8,500 construction workers during the peak construction periods. There will be significant HGV movement during the construction period, especially along the A55 and A5025. After construction it is foreseen that Wylfa Newydd will employ a workforce of around 1,000. The requirement for construction workers' accommodation is a matter that the Isle of Anglesey County Council has given detailed consideration. A sudden influx of workers is expected during the construction period. It is considered important that accommodation is consistent with the general objectives of the Plan and that it won't prejudice the spatial strategy. It is anticipated that the workforce will be accommodated via various means, private housing units to buy or rent, holiday accommodation and purpose built holiday accommodation provided by Horizon or through a third party. Further information regarding this viewpoint is given in http://www.anglesey.gov.uk/business/energy-island/energy-island-news/wylfa-nuclear-new-build-construction-workers-accomodation-position-statement/114494.article?redirect=false and in the New Nuclear Build at Wylfa Supplementary Planning Guidance http://www.anglesey.gov.uk/Journals/2014/08/11/q/k/h/Wylfa-NNB-SPG-Adopted-July-2014.pdf

View Comments (1) 7.3.10 It is important that the emerging Plan sets out a policy framework to assist the Councils to assess and respond to Major Infrastructure Projects proposals coming forward, including for example:



i. providing advice to inform project promoters during the development of their proposals for consultation and project development;

ii. responding to formal consultations during project development and on applications to other determining bodies such as Planning Inspectorate and the Marine Management Organisation (MMO);


iii. suggesting appropriate requirements for inclusion in the Development Consent Order and obligations (such as Section 106 and Community Infrastructure Levy - if adopted);


iv. determining applications for associated, ancillary or related development outside the Development Consent Order;


v. assessing the adequacy of consultation,


vi. assessing the impacts of the project both positive and negative in the Local Impact Report that Planning Inspectorate will invite the Council(s) to submit after the application for any Development Consent Order is submitted,


vii. making representations as part of the formal examination of the Development Consent Order by the Planning Inspectorate,


viii. in determining any approvals subsequent to consent (including planning 'conditions'), and in discharging functions as the enforcing authority.

View Comments (1) 7.3.11 It is anticipated that accommodation will be required for a substantial number of construction workers employed during the construction period of Wylfa Newydd. It is also anticipated that land will be required in relation to the Wylfa Newydd project, e.g. site(s) for offices, short stay accommodation and other purposes related to logistics, storage and off-site fabrication. Mitigation of the impacts of the project would be optimised if such development were located in accordance with the Plan's Spatial Strategy as set out in Chapter 6 and other relevant policies included in the Plan, depending on the type of use, in order to be consistent with the principle of sustainable development.

View Comments (1) 7.3.12 The Councils' position is that accommodation for the transient construction workers should as far as possible be provided within or adjacent to the development boundaries of the Centres identified in the Plan's Settlement Hierarchy, in locations that relate well to the main transport routes and transport modes, especially the railway. They should also contribute towards sustainable regeneration programmes and support the vitality and viability of town centres. Project promoters should consider re-using existing buildings where feasible. The Councils also consider that the potential for after use of sites used initially for construction workers accommodation or any other temporary use of land should be considered at the planning and design stage, e.g. laying out of sites at the outset so that they are capable of beneficial after use, construction of permanent buildings capable of being adapted for future community or commercial use. All proposed legacy uses must comply with this Plan. Potential legacy uses include serviced plots for affordable housing, elderly or special needs accommodation, student accommodation, offices or hotels, or buildings that can be refurbished for similar uses. If the project promoter and the Council agree that an after use is not feasible, structures or buildings should be removed and the land reinstated to the satisfaction of the Local Planning Authority within a specific period of time which would be controlled by planning condition.

View Comments (2) 7.3.13 The scale and impact of Major Infrastructure Projects may require an appropriate and comprehensive package of developer contributions to mitigate and compensate for any new and increased levels of impact and harm. These contributions will be negotiated as part of the planning process, including through section 106 agreements and the Community Infrastructure Levy if this is implemented.

View Comments (1) 7.3.14 In addition the Councils may require packages of community benefits to be provided by the developer to offset and compensate the community for the burden imposed by hosting a project. Any such fund will be used to off-set the burden on the locality, and would identify potential legacy uses, including transport, social, economic and community infrastructure which would benefit the community in the long term.

View Comments (1) 7.3.15 Community benefits may be sought through the provisions of the Local Government Acts, the Planning Acts, or other legislation, or alternatively through voluntary agreement with the project provider, or in accordance with an industry protocol.

View Comments (1) 7.3.16 Community benefits contributions are monetary payments from a developer for the benefit of communities hosting a development. Community benefits contributions are separate and distinct from the planning process. They are not a material consideration which can be taken into account in determining whether to grant consent or to respond positively or otherwise to a consultation request. Any payment made is not designed to cover the direct effects of the development and they cannot properly be judged to be necessary to make a development acceptable in planning terms

View Comments (1) 7.3.17 Strategic Policy PS8 is an overarching policy relating to all Major Infrastructure Projects whether determined by the Secretary of State, the Isle of Anglesey County Council, Gwynedd Council or any other agency. Strategic Policy PS9 applies to the proposed new nuclear power station including development associated with it. The project level HRA should be informed by the findings and conclusions of the HRA: Site Report for Wylfa1 as well as the HRA process for the Joint LDP.

View Comments (3) STRATEGIC POLICY PS8 PROPOSALS FOR LARGE INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS

In their role as authorities giving permission for associated development or as a consultees for applications to other bodies, within the context of national policy statements and national planning policy, the Councils will aim to ensure that development makes a positive contribution to achieving the vision and strategic objectives set out in the Plan. In doing so, consideration will be given to the nature, scale, range and possible impact of any development.

The Councils will therefore aim to ensure conformity, as far as is appropriate or relevant, with the following criteria:

  1. The development and associated/ancillary infrastructure, including any proposals for accommodation, education and training facilities, employment, supply chains, and transport, community, environmental and green infrastructure, will contribute to a balance of positive outcomes for local communities, visitors and the environment; and
  2. An assessment is submitted of how a consideration of alternative options influenced the proposals; and
  3. A comprehensive assessment is provided of the proposal's environmental (landscape, built, historic and natural), social (including health and amenity), linguistic and cultural, transport and economic impacts (positive, negative and cumulative) during the construction, operation and decommissioning and restoration (if relevant) phases, as well as measures to be achieved where appropriate to avoid, reduce, alleviate and/or off-set the harm done; and
  4. Provision of contributions to the Council or other appropriate and agreed organization to offset any adverse impacts and harm caused by the project through effective engagement with local communities and the Council at the pre-application stage. The objective will be to identify measures, projects and services to enhance the long term well-being and sustainability of the communities affected; and
  5. In recognition of any burden and disturbance borne by the community in hosting a major national infrastructure project, the Council may require appropriate packages of community benefits to be provided by the developer to offset and compensate the community for the burden imposed by hosting the project; and
  6. Local economic and community benefits are where feasible maximized, through agreement of strategies for procurement, employment, education, training and recruitment with the Council at an early stage of project development; and
  7. Any proposal for development, including all ancillary and induced development, must be accompanied by a project level Habitats Regulations Assessment, which meets the requirements of the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2010 (as amended); and
  8. The provision of flood protection measures to manage flood risk and, where feasible, deliver improvements in the locality. The provision of an assessment of anticipated impacts of the proposal on the surrounding marine and terrestrial environment and delivery of measures to manage and minimise any harm caused.

In order to have sufficient information to be able to assess the effects of the proposals, the Councils may request the preparation of management or delivery plans identifying the measures to be taken to maximize benefits and to mitigate and/or compensate for impacts where this is justified by national or local policy. These plans should identify the timetables for delivery and the systems and resources that will be used to implement the proposed measures.

View Comments (6) STRATEGIC POLICY PS9 WYLFA NEWYDD RELATED DEVELOPMENT

In their role either as determining authorities for associated development, or as consultees for applications to other bodies, and within the provisions of national policy, when assessing and responding to emerging proposals for nuclear related development including that associated with or ancillary to the existing or proposed Wylfa Newydd, the Councils will seek to ensure compliance, where appropriate or relevant, with the following criteria:

  1. Any relevant policies included in the Plan, and any relevant supplementary planning guidance should shape the approach to the development of proposals for nuclear related development and any associated development or infrastructure; and
  2. In order to minimise impact and maximize re-use of existing facilities and materials, opportunities have been taken where feasible to integrate the requirements of Wylfa Newydd with the proposed decommissioning of the existing power station; and
  3. Highways and transport proposals for Wylfa Newydd form part of a robust transport and logistics plan that has regard to Strategic Policy PS4 and any relevant detailed Policies in the Plan and minimizes adverse transport impacts to an acceptable level, including those arising during the construction, operation and decommissioning and restoration stages. Proposals should where feasible make a positive contribution to transportation policy objectives in the locality, and should include multi-modal solutions and investment that encourages travel by public transport, walking and cycling; and
  4. The accommodation requirements of construction workers should be met in a way that minimizes impact on the local housing market, including the ability of those on low incomes to access the private rented sector, affordable housing and other housing services, or not result in unacceptable adverse economic, social, linguistic or environmental impacts. Proposals should form part of a robust construction workers accommodation strategy that has regard to the Plan's Spatial Strategy and any relevant policies in the Plan; and
  5. The siting and design of associated development should be informed by a consideration of legacy uses, so that investment in elements such as infrastructure, buildings, ecological and landscape works brings long term benefits. Where appropriate, delivery plans should be agreed for legacy uses during the pre-application process that will inform the approach to the design and layout of the associated development sites, as well as the framing of a S106 and/or other agreements and CIL payments (if applicable); and
  6. The scheme layout and design and the scale of green infrastructure proposed should avoid, minimise mitigate or compensate for visual, landscape and ecological impacts on the local and wider area, as well as on cultural and historic aspects of the landscape, both in the short and longer term. Proposals will be expected to be commensurate with the scale of the development, and the extent of its impact; and
  7. Any proposal for development, including all ancillary and induced development, must be accompanied by a project level Habitats Regulations Assessment, which meets the requirements of the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2010 (as amended); and
  8. The provision of procurement, employment, education, training and recruitment strategies and delivery plans should be agreed by the Council at an early stage of project development, with an objective to maximize employment, business and training opportunities for the local communities both in the short and longer term; and
  9. Where community infrastructure is provided for construction workers, for example park and ride facilities, shops, healthcare and sports and leisure facilities, where feasible this should be sited and designed so that it can be made available for community use during the construction phase and ultimately, where appropriate, serve a community legacy use. Where there would be additional impacts or demands on existing facilities the Council will seek appropriate contributions for off-site facilities; and
  10. Proposals should include appropriate measures for promoting social cohesion and community safety; and
  11. The burden and disturbance borne by the community in hosting a major national or regional nuclear related infrastructure project should be recognised; and appropriate packages of voluntary community benefits provided by the developer will be sought to offset and compensate the community for the burden and disturbance imposed by hosting the project; and
  12. Any proposal (outside a DCO) to treat, store or dispose of Very Low level, Low Level or Intermediate Level Waste or to treat or to store spent fuel arising from the existing nuclear power station or any future nuclear development within or outside the Plan area, in an existing or proposed facility on or off the nuclear site would need to:

i. Be strongly justified;
ii. Demonstrate that the planning impacts are acceptable; and
iii. Demonstrate that the environmental, social and economic benefits outweigh any negative impacts.

It is possible that as the project develops, due to unforeseen consequences resulting from the construction and operation of the Wylfa Newydd, the Councils may require additional information from, or works to be carried out by the developer and may, as a result, seek to re-negotiate any mitigation or compensation package in order to off-set any additional impacts or burdens borne by the community affected. The developer should build in review mechanisms to monitor the full range of impacts, and to review the adequacy of mitigation or compensation measures and to make adjustments as necessary.

1Department of Energy and Climate Change (2010) Habitats Regulations Assessment: Site Report for Wylfa. EN-6: Revised Draft National Policy Statement for Nuclear Power Generation.

PROVIDING OPPORTUNITIES FOR A FLOURISHING ECONOMY

No Comments 7.3.18 Context

  • Economic development is an important pillar of sustainable development.

  • National policy requires an approach that facilitates and promotes development of employment land by making sure that there is a suitable amount and quality available which will enable economic development

.

  • The aim of the Single Integrated Strategy is to promote economic, social and environmental wellbeing in Anglesey and Gwynedd.

  • The Isle of Anglesey County Council and Gwynedd Council through their Corporate or Strategic Plan, taking into account the difficult economic times, aim in the long term to transform the Plan area into an enterprising and vibrant area economically and socially, with people of all ages able to grasp new opportunities and choosing to stay in the area to live and work.

  • It is necessary to give appropriate consideration to the environmental impact of the development against social economic benefits which would be gained from the development.

  • The Anglesey Energy Island Programme sets a framework to capitalise on the planned investment and growth potential of the low carbon energy sector. It is envisaged that it will become a major economic driver for Anglesey, North Wales and Wales.

  • The Welsh Government has designated the whole Island as an Enterprise Zone to focus on the energy sector with 9 specific sites identified. It is hoped that designating the whole Island as an Enterprise Zone will be a means of ensuring that the vision of the Energy Island Programme is realised. The Anglesey Enterprise Zone area has numerous large investment projects in the pipeline, which present opportunities for current local companies and to those wishing to locate in Anglesey as part of the supply chain.

  • The site of the former nuclear power station in Trawsfynydd and Llanbedr Airfield in Gwynedd (which lie outside the Plan area), have been identified as key sites within the Snowdonia Enterprise Zone designation. The vision for the former nuclear power plant in Trawsfynydd is ITC and digital, enterprises, generating innovative low carbon energy and technology companies, whereas the vision for the Llanbedr Airfield Site relates to the Unmanned Air System (UAS) industry .

No Comments 7.3.19 Introduction

An objective of the Plan is to facilitate both Councils' strategies to grow and diversify the Plan area's economy.

No Comments 7.3.20 If a decision is made on a national level to develop Wylfa Newydd, significant employment opportunities will be created during the construction period. There are also a number of proposed infrastructure projects which will offer significant employment opportunities. The Isle of Anglesey County Council launched the Energy Island Programme, which is a collaborative project between a number of stakeholders in the public and private sectors (including the UK Government and the Welsh Government) to place Anglesey at the forefront in terms of energy research and development, generating and servicing and which will be a means of influencing major infrastructure projects due to be located within the Plan area or on its periphery. This includes developing local residents' skills so that they can take advantage of the jobs available as a result of these major projects, which in turn is likely to be attractive to new businesses to locate in the area, offering high quality jobs. It aims to particularly capitalise on the £8billion investment in a new nuclear facility at Wylfa, providing a focus for both public and private sector partners' investment plans, while transforming and diversifying the area's economy. With the aim of developing and encouraging the necessary skills to work in the employment sector investment has been made in the Grwp Llandrillo Menai campus in Llangefni, with further prospective investment likely. Another aim of the Energy Island Programme is to attempt to overcome infrastructure constraints, as a means of attempting to attract internal investment to the area and encouraging future economic growth. Further, there is an intention by Bangor University with the backing of Welsh Government to develop a Science Park. The preferred site for the development is one of the Enterprise Zone sites in Gaerwen. The Science Park would generate employment opportunities in the energy sector and environmental service.

No Comments 7.3.21 Similarly Gwynedd Council with its partners seek to focus on sectors and activities in which the area has competitive advantages, which will yield the greatest economic benefits and which will offer the greatest diversification potential. This will involve combining strengths in the area's research institutions, its people (and their skills) and the area's abundant natural resources. Specific sectors that provide an opportunity for the area include:

Construction; Environmental - Green sector products and services; Agriculture - produce and food products; Creative Industries - Media and Arts; Care; High Technology and Digital Sectors; Services and Commerce e.g. Retail; Nuclear Energy - Generation, Services and Engineering; Tourism; Alternative Renewable Energy - Generation, Services and Engineering

No Comments 7.3.22 Gwynedd Council's key aim is to seek to ensure a geographical spread of employment opportunities. The rural economy has an important role in the area in terms of the agricultural sector, tourism and small rural businesses.

No Comments 7.3.23 The 2011 Employment Land Review revealed an excess of existing employment land that is unlikely to meet the requirements of modern business. The Review estimates that 6ha per annum of business or industrial park type land is required over the Plan period within each local Planning Authority area, based on a combination of indicators of future requirement for different sectors of employment, and allowing for flexibility and choice within the market, in addition to achieving the future aspirations of the Anglesey Energy Island Programme and the Councils' priorities. The Review establishes a hierarchy of employment sites that could meet the needs of modern business, have prospects of being developed during the Plan period and should be safeguarded, as far as is possible, from redevelopment for other uses. Additional provision for employment uses (B1, B2 or B8) in or near to the Urban Service Centres of Pwllheli and Porthmadog is required in order to redress the current imbalance in the geographical spread of employment land within Gwynedd, as well as some reserve sites to ensure the necessary supply of land relating to large infrastructure projects on Anglesey.

No Comments 7.3.24 Since the Employment Land review was undertaken in 2011/12, North Wales Councils and the Snowdonia National Park Planning Authority have collaborated to undertake 'North Wales Regional Employment Land Strategy'. The Strategy identifies a portfolio of strategic employment sites and tries to determine how these will satisfy the demand during the Regional Strategy's lifetime. It concludes that there is sufficient employment land available across the area which is evenly distributed with greater emphasis in the North West and Anglesey, reflecting the Enterprise Zone status.

View Comments (14) STRATEGIC POLICY PS10 PROVIDING OPPORTUNITY FOR A FLOURISHIN ECONOMY

Whilst seeking to protect and enhance the natural and built environment, the Councils will facilitate economic growth by:

  1. Safeguarding 807 ha of land and units for employment and business purposes that would require or benefit from business or industrial park type location in relation to B1, B2, B8 and some sui generis uses on sites included in the employment land hierarchy during the Plan period and which have been allocated on the proposal maps (in accordance with Policy CYF1);
  2. Facilitate appropriate sites which become available on windfall sites which could satisfy any additional needs to those indicated in criterion 1 and in accordance with the principles given in Strategic Policy PS5 and Strategic Policy PS6 and the Plan's Spatial Strategy, in order to ensure that economic opportunities are maximised;
  3. Supporting economic prosperity and sustainability of rural communities by facilitating appropriately scaled growth of rural enterprises, extension of existing businesses and diversification by supporting the re-use of existing buildings, the development 'live work' units, working from home, and by encouraging the provision of sites and premises in appropriate accessible locations consistent with the Plan's Spatial Strategy and in line with Strategic Policies PS5 and PS6;

View Comments (9) STRATEGIC POLICY CYF1 SAFEGUARDING AND ALLOCATING LAND AND UNITS FOR EMPLOYMENT USE

Land and units on existing employment sites listed below are safeguarded for employment/ business enterprises. Additional land is allocated as listed below for employment/business enterprises. All sites are shown on the Proposals Map.

(1 Figure correct at the time of carrying out the Employment Survey, 2011)

Site

Map

Reference

Vacant Land Area

(ha)1

Total Area

(ha)

Use

Enterprise

Zone Site

Regional Plan

Status

PRIMARY

SITES

GWYNEDD

View Comments (4) Parc Bryn Cegin, Bangor

C1

36

36

B1, B2, B8

Not Applicable

Strategic Regional Site
View Comments (1) Llandygai Industrial Estate Bangor C2 4 27.6

B1, B2, B8

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

View Comments (1) Parc Britannia, Bangor C3 0 7.9 B1

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

View Comments (1) Parc Menai, Bangor C4 13.2 32.9 B1

Not Applicable

Strategic Sub-regional Site (Secondary)

View Comments (2) Cibyn Industrial Estate

Caernarfon

C5 7.3 37.7 B1 B2, B8

Not Applicable

Strategic Sub-regional Site (Main)

View Comments (4) Adwy'r Hafan

Pwllheli

C6 1.5 10.5 B1, B8

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

View Comments (2) Business Park

Penrhyndeudraeth

C7 3.1 11.5 B1

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

View Comments (2) Business Park

Porthmadog

C8 4 13.5 B1, B2

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

View Comments (1) Pendre Estate

Tywyn

C9 2.7 7.9 B1, B2

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

View Comments (3) Adjacent to the petrol station

Y Ffôr

C10 1.7 1.7 B1, B2, B8

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

PRIMARY

SITES

ANGLESEY

View Comments (4) Parc Cybi

Holyhead

C11 53 109.2 B1, B2, B8 Yes Strategic Regional Site (Main)

View Comments (1) Penrhos Industrial Estate

Holyhead

C12 2.69 5.8 B2, B8 Yes Strategic Sub-regional Site (Secondary)

View Comments (1) Bryn Cefni Industrial Estate

Llangefni

C13 18 59.5 B1, B2, B8 Yes

Not Applicable

View Comments (5) Land to the North of Lledwigan Farm

Llangefni

C14 20.3 20.6 B1, B2, B8 Yes Strategic Regional Site (Main)

View Comments (4) Land in the Creamery

Llangefni

C15 4.9 4.9 B1, B2, B8 Yes Strategic Regional Site (Main)

SECONDARY

SITES

GWYNEDD

View Comments (2) Hirael Bay

Bangor

C16 6.72 9.1 B1

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

View Comments (1) Felin Fawr

Bethesda

C17 0.4 1.5 B2

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

View Comments (1) Tanygrisiau Site

Blaenau Ffestiniog

C18 2.7 7.4 B1, B2, B8

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

View Comments (2) Peblig

Caernarfon

C19 2.2 6.7 B2

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

View Comments (3) Former site of Friction Dynamex

Caernarfon

C20 7.4 7.4 B2, B8

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

View Comments (1) Glyn Rhonwy

Llanberis

C21 3.3 29.8 B1, B2, B8

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

View Comments (3) Former site of Ysbyty Bron y Garth

Penrhyndeudraeth

C22 1.5 16 B1

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

View Comments (1) Penygroes

Industrial Estate

C23 4.3 10 B1, B2, B8

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

View Comments (1) Agricultural Park

Llanystumdwy

C24 1.5 6.6 B1, B2, B8

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

View Comments (1) Nefyn Industrail Estate C25 1.7 3.5 B1, B2, B8

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

View Comments (3) Wynnstay Farmers Site

Rhosfawr

C26 1.4 4.9 B2

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

View Comments (2) Y Ffôr Industrial Estate C27 2.8 2.8 B2

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

View Comments (1) Griffin Industrial Estate

Penrhyndeudraeth

C39 4.9 B1, B2, B8

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

SECONDARY

SITES

ANGLESEY

View Comments (2) Former Shell Land

Amlwch

C28 7 19.3 B2, B8 No

Not Applicable

View Comments (2) Llwyn Onn Industrial Estate

Amlwch

C29 3.16 15 B1, B2, B8 No

Not Applicable

View Comments (2) Anglesey Aluminium Land

Holyhead

C30 81.7 90.5 B1, B2, B8 Yes Strategic Regional Site (Main)

View Comments (3) Former Eaton Electrical Site

Holyhead

C31 2 2 B1, B2 No

Not Applicable

View Comments (3) Kinsgland Site

Holyhead

C32 0.8 0.8 B1, B2 No

Not Applicable

View Comments (3) Gaerwen Industrial Estate C33 25.2 58.1 B1, B2, B8 Yes Strategic Regional Site (Main)

View Comments (2) Land near Mona airfield

Mona

C34 8.9 20.5 B2, B8 No

Not Applicable

The following sites are identified as 'reserve sites' associated with Anglesey Energy Island Programme. Before consideration can be given to releasing these lands for employment use, need would have to be demonstrated, plus evidence that the proposed development on the site is directly related to realising the objectives of the Anglesey Energy Island Programme and that there was no suitable protected employment site to meet the need.

SITE MAP REFERENCE

AREA

(TOTAL)

USE

ENTERPRISE

ZONE SITE

RESERVE

SITES

View Comments (4) Holyhead Port, Holyhead C (wg) 35 41.9 B1, B2, B8 Yes
View Comments (3) Extension to Gaerwen Industrial Estate, Gaerwen C (wg) 36 20 B1, B2, B8 No
View Comments (2) Former site of Shell, Rhosgoch C (wg) 37 82.2 B1, B2, B8 Yes

Land near Gaerwen shown on the Proposals Map (C38) is identified as the preferred site for developing the Menai Science Park.

No Comments 7.3.25 Explanation:

To ensure that there is a balanced provision of employment land which is likely to meet the employment needs and opportunities that are facilitated by both Councils' Strategies, including the Anglesey Energy Island Programme/ Enterprise Island, and the Enterprise Zone Snowdonia, it is intended to protect employment land in accordance with the hierarchy referred to above in Policy CYF1. It is recognized that these sites have an important role in maintaining and securing future employment opportunities, and therefore the intention is to protect them for those purposes. The different strata within the hierarchy are defined as follows:

Primary Sites

Sites that are likely to be more attractive to the market and are likely to be developed in the short term.

Secondary Sites

Sites that are not in the most attractive location as regards access and market presence in comparison to the primary sites. However, they offer important opportunities which address local demand as well as the potential demand arising from Anglesey Energy Island Programme/ Enterprise Island.

Reserve Sites

Sites that have the potential to meet the demand resulting from Wylfa Newydd as well as the rest of the Anglesey Energy Island Programme/ Enterprise Island

Strategic Regional Site

Sites of regional importance with a critical role in achieving regional and contributing to national economic development objectives, supporting key sector development.

Strategic Sub-Regional Site

Sites with a more general and localised focus for economic development than regional strategic sites with a focus on attracting employers that draw a workforce from wider than the local area.

No Comments 7.3.26 It is important that the Plan provides an appropriate portfolio of employment land in terms of range, quality and quantity to meet the local demand for employment land and units. Safeguarding the sites named above is a means of ensuring that this need is met.

No Comments 7.3.27 Traditionally the rate of take up of employment land within the Plan area has been 4ha per annum. To ensure that there is provision for the possibility of slippage and flexibility of economic stimulus that would lead to greater demand for employment land, the Plan provides for the rate of take up of employment land 6ha per annum.

No Comments 7.3.28 It is expected that the location of the majority of employment developments within the area and within the Plan period will be on sites that are identified in Policy CYF1. This protection will allow new developments, as well as extension and intensification of employment activities on existing employment sites.

View Comments (1) POLICY CYF2 ANCILLIARY USES ON EMPLOYMENT SITES

The sites named in Policy CYF1 and as identified on the Proposals Map are protected for employment/business uses in accordance with what is stated in Policy CYF1. In exceptional circumstances it would be possible to consider applications for anciliary uses (i.e. not the use that is promoted in Policy CYF1), provided that:

  1. There is overwhelming justification for the facility;
  2. The scale of development is primarily in keeping with the needs of the workforce on the employment site;
  3. That the proposed development would not in itself or cumulatively undermine the function of the employment site;
  4. That the development would not lead to an under provision of B1, B2 or B8 employment land.

No Comments 7.3.29 Explanation:

This Policy is specifically concerned with the uses considered to be ancillary to an employment site such as a cafe or children's nursery which would be beneficial to have on the employment site in terms of making it more sustainable by reducing the need to travel and attracting people to work in the employment sites.

No Comments 7.3.30 It will be essential to ensure that the development is appropriate in terms of nature and scale to primarily meet the needs of the workforce at the employment site in question, and that it would not rely on customers from outside the employment site.

No Comments POLICY CYF3 NEW LARGE SINGLE USER INDUSTRIAL OR BUSINESS ENTERPRISE ON SITES NOT SAFEGUARDED OR ALLOCATED FOR EMPLOYMENT PURPOSES

Proposals for large single user industrial or business enterprises (use class B1, B2 and B8) which cannot be accommodated on safeguarded or allocated sites within the Plan area will be granted provided they conform to all of the following criteria:

  1. The proposed site is located within or adjoining the development boundary of the Sub-Regional Centre, Urban or Local Centre;
  2. That compelling evidence is presented to justify the need for the development taking into account the national tests set out in Planning Policy Wales and Technical Advice Note (TAN) 23;
  3. Where appropriate, an existing building or a previously developed site is used in order to meet the need;
  4. That the scale, type and design of the development is appropriate for the site and the locality or is compatible with existing uses on the site.

No Comments 7.3.31 Explanation:

It is considered that the Plan provides for a sufficient range - in terms of volume, mix, quality and distribution of existing industrial / business within the Plan area to meet demand. However, there may be cases where in the plan's period where a large employer is unable to find a suitable site on existing or allocated sites. In these cases any applications for industrial or business use, which would be a departure from the Plan, can be considered taking into account the normal planning criteria and if there is a need for the development.

No Comments 7.3.32 The aim of this policy is to support new large scale initiatives as long as they are located in an appropriate location and are sustainable and that they are well related to settlements. In considering such initiatives, it is essential to follow the sequential test and guidance process contained in Planning Policy Wales along with Technical Advice Note (TAN) 23: 'Economic Development' which identifies the need to ensure there is no other more suitable location option which would be able to meet the need, assurance as to the number of direct jobs that would be created by the initiative, and whether it would make any special contribution to policy objectives. Only in exceptional circumstances would new initiatives be permitted on non-safeguarded or allocated sites, and it will be necessary to receive a complete justification of the proposal and the locational need. It is essential that appropriate evidence is presented which proves there is no alternative option of being able to use a site that has been safeguarded or allocated for employment use, or that there are no previously developed sites that could be suitable to meet demand.

No Comments 7.3.33 The Council would need to be convinced that the enterprise concerned is financially viable and that there are local employment benefits arising from it. One way of proving this would be to present a professional Business Plan prepared by an independent expert. Applications which would create an impact on the amenities of the local area will not be supported.

View Comments (3) POLICY CYF4 ALTERNATIVE USES OF EMPLOYMENT SITES

Proposals to release employment land on sites safeguarded or allocated for Use Classes B1, B2 or B8 in accordance with Policy CYF1 for alternative uses will be granted only in special circumstances, provided they conform to the following criteria:

  1. If the site is vacant, that it is unlikely to be used in the short and medium term for the original use or the safeguarded use and there isn't a viable business or industrial use for the site;
  2. There is an over provision of employment sites within the vicinity;
  3. The current employment use is having a detrimental effect on amenity and the environment;
  4. The proposal would not have a detrimental effect on employment uses at adjacent sites.
  5. There is no other suitable alternative site for the proposed use.
  6. If the site is used in the short term (on a temporary basis) it should be assured that there are appropriate restoration measures in place to the satisfaction of the Local Planning Authority.

No Comments 7.3.34 Explanation:

The Plan seeks to ensure that there is adequate and appropriate provision of land for employment purposes. It is essential that these sites are located in areas close to settlements where people live in order to reduce the need to travel to work.

No Comments 7.3.35 There are cases where some traditional employment sites have been dormant for a while. Furthermore it is recognized that traditional employment uses do not tend to produce land values that compare with uses such as housing or retail.

No Comments 7.3.36 It would be necessary to receive a full justification for the change of use of land or units allocated for B1-B8 use class purposes for alternative uses, including information regarding the viability of the existing employment use, any attempt that has been made to market the unit/land for employment, and information regarding the provision of employment sites which meet local demand.

No Comments 7.3.37 When considering the release of existing employment sites it will be essential to ensure that the integrity of the employment site is not compromised specifically because it meets the needs of local employment. Furthermore it would be necessary to ensure that any potential use is not in conflict with the employment use remaining on the site.

No Comments 7.3.38 In the circumstance where an employment site is released as an alternative site on a temporary basis, the planning application must be supported with evidence to demonstrate to the satisfaction of the Local Planning Authority that the site can be restored to its original state, unless the temporary development provides infrastructure that can be ustilised in the future.

View Comments (2) Policy CYF5 REUSE AND CONVERSION OF RURAL BUILDINGS, USE OF RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES OR NEW BUILD UNITS FOR BUSINESS / INDUSTRIAL USE

Proposals to convert rural buildings for business use or modification of residential units to allow working from home or new business or industrial units will be granted provided they conform to the following criteria:

  1. The scale and nature of the development is acceptable given its location and size of the building in question;
  2. That the development would not lead to an use that conflicts with nearby uses or has an impact on the viability of similar uses nearby;
  3. Where proposals involve the use of an existing building:

i. The building is structurally sound;
ii. The scale of any extension is necessary and of reasonable size;
iii. The building is suitable for the specific use.

No Comments 7.3.39 Explanation:

With advances in technology and broadband connections within rural communities, there are more opportunities for people to work from home, to convert rural buildings to be used for businesses or build new units. The aim of this policy is to encourage rural communities to become more sustainable and to promote close links between living and working locations.

No Comments 7.3.40 It is considered that the provision of rural workshops and small scale industrial units serve to support the sustainability and self-sufficiency of rural areas. This Policy encourages small scale developments that make appropriate use of existing buildings that are suitable for a business or industrial use as well as appropriately scaled new buildings. Supplementary Planning Guidance will be prepared to provide advice on the matter.

View Comments (1) POLICY CYF6 REGENERATION SITES

In order to promote economic growth as well as contributing towards social and environmental sustainability proposals for urban renewal schemes that accord with any master plan/ strategy adopted or supported by the Councils will be granted provided they conform to the following criteria:

  1. Include provision of appropriate infrastructure;
  2. Support any local, regional and national economic regeneration plans;
  3. Ensure that jobs, services and housing are located close to each other, to reduce the need to travel;
  4. Encourage the reuse of previously developed land, vacant buildings or land that is underutilized;
  5. Create opportunities for physical regeneration and employment opportunities in deprived areas.

No Comments 7.3.41 Explanation:

Redeveloping redundant sites for mixed use is an effective way of ensuring urban renewal, including an appropriate mix of housing (including affordable housing), employment, retail, education, leisure and amenity uses. It offers the opportunity to use land/buildings that are not being used to their full potential. This policy specifically relates to sites that are located within town centres and that are part of the urban regeneration vision of the Councils.

No Comments 7.3.42 Further guidance is given regarding the expected mix of uses in regeneration sites within the relevant adopted master plans/strategies.

No Comments POLICY CYF7 HOLYHEAD REGENERATION AREA

Within the Holyhead Regeneration Area development proposals which will aid transformational change by encouraging Holyhead to become a more attractive location to live, work, visit and enjoy will be supported as long as they are well planned and have a realistic prospect of being implemented. The aim of any future development should be to:

  1. Support Holyhead's role as a tourism centre and as a gateway to Wales and the rest of the United Kingdom;
  2. Improve connections within the town and with the Port in line with Strategic Policy PS4;
  3. Support opportunities to live, work, shop and spend time participating in leisure and cultural activities within the town;
  4. Contribute towards improving the town's physical environment in line with Policy PCYFF2;
  5. Improve and protect the town's rich heritage in line with Policy PCYFF2.

No Comments 7.3.43 Explanation:

A number of the town's features are part of Holyhead's identity; they are features to be proud of such as the town's rich history, notable links with the sea and port as well as good railway links. Whilst Holyhead has several locational advantages such as its role as an international port and the most populated town in Anglesey, traditional staple industrial sectors have declined, and there have been various constraints to new job-creating development. Already higher than average levels of unemployment, poverty and deprivation have been compounded in recent years by the loss of major industrial employers in the town and vicinity. Significant new employment is needed to replace the jobs lost and sustainably reduce the level of poverty and related problems in the town.

No Comments 7.3.44 Most of the wards in Holyhead (before the restructuring of wards in 2013) are included in the Welsh Government's Communities First anti-poverty programme which targets the most deprived wards in Wales. Holyhead has also been identified as a priority in the Welsh Government's area regeneration programmes (e.g. Vibrant and Viable Places 2014-17), and several areas of the town have been designated as Enterprise Zones. Further information regarding regeneration aspirations for Holyhead can be viewed in the Holyhead 2020: Realising Sustainable Community Benefit, Strategic Outline Programme (2013) as well as the Holyhead Town Centre Study: Vision and Regeneration Masterplan Report (2014). The aim of this policy is therefore to help realise the objective of regenerating Holyhead. In line with Policy PCYFF 1 development proposals will need to conform to all other relevant policies in the Plan.

No Comments 7.3.45 Holyhead has also successfully received Townscape Initiative Heritage status which aims to increase the economic activity within the town's commercial core whilst using the historic environment as a positive resource to safeguard and create employment opportunities whilst improving the quality of life for the local community. Gaining this status means that grant assistance is available to support the repair, architectural reinstatement and reuse of historic buildings.

THE VISITOR ECONOMY

View Comments (1) 7.3.46 Context

  • Tourism has always been important in the Plan area. It already supports many jobs and businesses in the area
  • Holiday tourism 'Staycation' has increased as some people have opted to holiday at home.
  • The Welsh Governments strategy for tourism (2013 - 2020): Partnership for Growth, focuses on the need for: promotion, product development, people, profitable performance and place building.
  • The North Wales Regional Tourism Strategy (2010 - 2015) undertaken by Tourism Partnership North Wales emphasizes the need to promote distinctive strengths, to invest in product excellence, to provide an outstanding experience for visitors and to work together in partnership with local stakeholders.
  • Both Councils' Strategic/Corporate Plans also identify tourism as a key priority
  • Both Councils have an adopted Destination Management Plan which is an important strategic document outlining the destinations vision for the future of the tourism sector.

View Comments (1) 7.3.47 Introduction

Tourism provides an important source of income to several towns and rural communities in the form of visitor spending on accommodation, food, drink, leisure activities and shopping, and also to local business supply chains and wholesalers. Tourism brings over £238 million into Anglesey's local economy and over £851 million into Gwynedd (including Snowdonia National Park) each year and supports over 4,000 and 15,819 local jobs, respectively.

No Comments 7.3.48 The Plan area's greatest tourism assets lie with its natural and historic environment. However, as well as being the Plan area's most valuable tourism assets, the unspoilt countryside and coastline, and historic features are also the area's most sensitive resources. Much of the Plan area is protected by international, national, regional and local designations. Parts of the Plan area also form the setting of the Snowdonia National Park.

No Comments 7.3.49 The Isle of Anglesey Council and Gwynedd Council have adopted their Destination Management Plans. The Destination Management Plans set out the aim, objectives and vision for the Authority's area, drawing on the existing regional tourism strategy. Under each objective, key projects are identified for the Delivery Plan. The Delivery Plan then provides more detail on each of the identified projects.

No Comments 7.3.50 Therefore development proposals should also align with and be informed by the DMPs and other local and national policy documents and strategies.

View Comments (11) STRATEGIC POLICY PS11 THE VISITOR ECONOMY

Whilst ensuring compatibility with the local economy and communities and ensuring the protection of the natural, built and historic environment the Councils will support the development of a year-round local tourism industry by:

  1. Focusing larger scale, active and sustainable tourism, cultural, the arts and leisure development in the sub-regional centre, urban service centres, and, where appropriate, local service centres;
  2. Protecting and enhancing existing serviced accommodation and supporting the provision of new high quality serviced accommodation in or near the sub-regional, urban and rural service centres and villages;
  3. Managing the provision of high quality un-serviced tourism accommodation in the form of camping, alternative luxury camping, static or touring caravan or chalet parks;
  4. Supporting appropriately scaled new tourist provision and initiatives in sustainable locations in the countryside through the reuse of existing buildings, where appropriate, or as part of farm diversification, particularly where these would also benefit local communities and support the local economy and where they are in accordance with sustainable development objectives;
  5. Preventing development that would have an unacceptable adverse impact on tourist facilities, including accommodation and areas of visitor interest or their setting, and maximise opportunities to restore previous landscape damage.

View Comments (6) POLICY TWR1 VISITOR ATTRACTIONS AND FACILITIES

Proposals to develop new visitor attractions and facilities or to improve and extend the standard of existing facilities will be encouraged to locate to sites within the development boundary.

Where there are no suitable opportunities within the development boundary, only proposals that involve the following will be granted:

1. The re-use of an existing building(s) or a suitable previously used site; or
2. The re-use of an existing building(s) or a site closely related to other existing buildings that forms part of an existing tourist facility; or
3. An activity restricted to a specific location due to its appropriate use of a historical or natural resource.


All proposals will be required to comply with all the following criteria:

4. Where it is reasonably practical it can be accessed by various modes of transport, especially sustainable modes of transport such as walking, cycling and public transport;
5. The scale, type and character of the proposed development is appropriate for its urban/rural setting;
6. The proposed development is of high quality in terms of design, layout and appearance;
7. The proposed development will support and extend the range of facilities within the Plan area;
8. The proposal is supported by evidence to demonstrate that there would be local employment opportunities.

No Comments 7.3.51 Explanation:

In order to sustain a prosperous tourism industry that provides employment opportunities for local communities it is essential to extend the variety and standard of visitor attractions and facilities. New attractions and facilities can help in securing employment and generate income. The developments can also increase the range of facilities open to local people.

No Comments 7.3.52 The natural and built environments are key factors in attracting tourists into the Plan area, however new tourism developments can have a negative impact upon the local environment and communities if they are insensitively developed or inappropriately located.

No Comments 7.3.53 This policy aims to encourage the development of high quality sustainable tourism attractions and facilities in the right place. New attractions and facilities should be located within development boundaries where visitors can access a range of services by a choice of travel modes.

No Comments 7.3.54 The policy also recognises that in exceptional circumstances some attractions and facilities require an open countryside, non-urban location which could be acceptable where they result in an all year round tourism facility and rural employment gain. However, development should not be at the expense of the local environment or community interests. Outside of the development boundaries proposals should first look at re-using or extending existing buildings in order to protect the countryside from inappropriate development. However, new build attractions could be permitted in certain areas of the countryside if it can be demonstrated there are no sequentially preferable sites and buildings.

View Comments (6) POLICY TWR2 HOLIDAY ACCOMMODATION

Proposals for:


1. The development of new permanent serviced or self-serviced holiday accommodation, or
2. The conversion of existing buildings into such accommodation, or
3. Extending existing holiday accommodation establishments,

will be permitted, provided they are of a high quality in terms of design, layout and appearance and that all the following criteria can be met:

4. In the case of new build accommodation, that the development is located within a development boundary, or makes use of a suitable previously developed site;
5. That the proposed development is appropriate in scale considering the site, location and/or settlement in question;
6. That the proposal will not result in a loss of permanent housing stock;
7. That the development is not sited within a primarily residential area or does not significantly harm the residential character of an area;
8. That the development does not lead to an over-concentration of such accommodation within the area.

View Comments (1) 7.3.55 Explanation:

This policy is not relevant to proposals to establish new static holiday and touring caravans, holiday chalets or alternative luxury camping sites. Such proposals will be considered under policies TWR3 and TWR5 of this Plan.

No Comments 7.3.56 In terms of serviced accommodation, this policy applies to a variety of different types from large high quality hotels to small bed and breakfast accommodation. Quality hotels and other serviced accommodation can potentially bring significant economic benefits to the Plan area and broaden the range of holiday accommodation available to visitors. It is widely recognized that the Plan area lacks an adequate range of such accommodation. The aim of this policy is to support the principle of expanding the range and improving the quantity and quality of serviced accommodation. In line with Policy PS11 it is also important that the loss of hotels is resisted.

No Comments 7.3.57 Policy PS11 and Policy TWR2 also recognizes that managing the wide range of high quality self-serviced accommodation is essential in providing visitors with choice. The policy therefore aims to support the principle of providing high quality self-serviced holiday accommodation in sustainable locations which presents such a choice.

No Comments 7.3.58 Where planning permission is given for self-serviced accommodation, a condition will be attached to ensure that the building will only be used as holiday accommodation and that it cannot be used for permanent occupation. 'New-build' self- serviced accommodation will not be permitted in the open countryside to protect the area from private holiday homes being built across the Plan Area

No Comments 7.3.59 Historically national planning guidance and local planning policy (particularly within the Gwynedd Local Planning Authority area) has given priority to the conversion of existing buildings in the countryside for economic use. This means that within some areas there is an abundance of buildings that have been converted to self-serviced accommodation. Clearly it is not the intention of national guidance or the Council for this policy to lead an over-concentration of this type of holiday accommodation within a particular location. Supplementary Planning Guidance will be published to provide more information about the matter.

View Comments (20) POLICY TWR3 STATIC CARAVAN AND CHALET SITES AND PERMANENT ALTERNATIVE CAMPING ACCOMMODATION

1. Proposals for the development of new static caravan1 (i.e. single or twin caravan), holiday chalet2 sites or permanent alternative camping accommodation will be refused within the Anglesey Coast Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, Llŷn Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and the Special Landscape Areas. In other locations proposals for new static caravan or holiday chalet sites and permanent alternative camping accommodation will only be granted where:


i. It can be demonstrated that it doesn't lead to a significant intensification in the provision of static caravan or chalet or permanent alternative camping sites in the locality; and

ii. That the proposed development is of a high quality in terms of design, layout and appearance, and is sited in an unobtrusive location which is well screened by existing landscape features and/or where the units can be readily assimilated into the landscape in a way which does not significantly harm the visual quality of the landscape; and

iii. That the site is close to the main highway network and that adequate access can be provided without significantly harming landscape characteristics and features.

2. In exceptional circumstances, proposals involving the relocation of an existing static or chalet site already located in the Anglesey Coast Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, Llŷn Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and the Special Landscape Areas that forms part of the Coastal Change Management Area shown on the Constraints Map to another site will only be permitted providing that criteria 1. i - iii are met and the new site is located outside the Coastal Change Management Area.

3. Within the Anglesey Coast Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, Llŷn Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and the Special Landscape Areas proposals to improve existing static and chalet sites by:


i. minor extensions to the site area, and/or

ii. the relocation of units from prominent settings to less prominent locations,

will be permitted providing all of the following criteria can be met:

iii. the improvements does not increase the number of static caravan or chalet units on the site;

iv. that the proposed development is part of a scheme to improve the range and quality of tourist accommodation and facilities on the site;

v. in the case of a site located within the Coastal Change Management Area, that the proposed development is also part of a scheme to improve the safety of occupiers of occupiers of caravans or chalets;

vi. that the proposed development offers significant and permanent improvements to the design, layout and appearance of the site and its setting in the surrounding landscape;


vii. is appropriate when considered against other policies in the Plan

4. Outside the Anglesey Coast Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, Llŷn Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and the Special Landscape Areas proposals to improve existing static caravan and chalet sites by:

i. minor extensions to the site area, and/or

ii. the relocation of units from prominent settings to less prominent locations, and/or,

iii. a minor increase in the number of units on site,

will be permitted providing all of the following criteria can be met:

iv. That the proposed development is part of a scheme to improve the range and quality of tourist accommodation and facilities on the site;


v. That the proposed development offers significant and permanent improvements to the design, layout and appearance of the site and its setting in the surrounding landscape;

vi. In the case of a site located within the Coastal Change Management Area, that the proposed development is part of a scheme to improve the safety of occupiers of occupiers of caravans or chalets;


vii. That any increase in the number of static holiday caravan or holiday chalet units is minor and is commensurate with the scale of any improvements to the site;


viii. Is appropriate when considered against other policies in the Plan

No Comments 7.3.60 Explanation:

Static caravan and chalet sites are an important source of holiday accommodation within the plan area. However, the proliferation of static caravan and chalet parks, especially along the coastline, has had a detrimental impact on the appearance of the landscape. The high number of existing sites on the coastline means that some parts of the plan area are already well served by such uses, with the static holiday caravan and holiday chalet sector providing the majority of all visitor accommodation bed spaces within the area. Consequently, there may be no justification for the provision of either new static holiday caravans (single or twin units) or new holiday chalets sites within coastal areas.

No Comments 7.3.61 The Isle of Anglesey, Gwynedd and Snowdonia National Park Landscape Sensitivity and Capacity Study was commissioned to manage development such as static caravan and chalet sites by identifying and protecting sensitive and distinct areas from inappropriate development. The study concluded that in some areas outside the Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and Special Landscape Areas there may be very limited capacity for static caravan/chalet park developments typically comprising of very infrequent, very small scale, well sited, high quality developments. In all cases development should avoid the undeveloped coastal edge and its immediate setting.

No Comments 7.3.62 The relocation of existing sites within the Coastal Change Management Zone will be permitted where they comply with the criteria in Policy TWR3, Policy ARNA1 and all other relevant policies in the Plan

View Comments (1) 7.3.63 The primary objective for designating Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty is the conservation and enhancement of their natural beauty therefore they must be afforded the highest status of protection from inappropriate developments. The cumulative impacts of static caravan and chalet developments within the Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty can be obtrusive in the landscape and damaging to the character of the rural area unless strictly controlled. Special Landscape Areas are non-statutory local designations. Their aim is to ensure that the landscape is not damaged by inappropriate development. The sensitivity and capacity study concluded that within the Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and Special Landscape Areas (and all areas that contribute to their setting), it is considered that there is typically no capacity for further static caravan/chalet park developments or extensions.

View Comments (2) 7.3.64 Within the Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty and Special Landscape Areas an extension of a site, but without an increase in caravan or chalet numbers, may be permitted if it can be demonstrated that there would be clear benefits in reducing the impact on the surrounding landscape.

View Comments (1) 7.3.65 Whilst some sites have already seen progressive improvement, many require upgrading and improvement. Many existing sites are located in visually sensitive areas, particularly along the coastline. The aim of this policy is to promote improvements and upgrade the standard of visitor accommodation on existing sites, and to reduce the impact of these sites on the landscape, including views out of the Snowdonia National Park. Proposals to provide retail facilities (foods and non-food), restaurants/cafes and take-away food are dealt with under the retailing policies of this Plan.

View Comments (2) 7.3.66 Outside the Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty and Special Landscape Areas a minor increase in units on site may be approved providing it can be demonstrated that the proposal offers significant improvements to the site and reducing its landscape impact. Minor in relation to extending site area is not defined except in relation to an increase in the number of units and should be no greater than a 10% increase on the number at the time of the original application. However, because of the considerable variety in the size, nature and location of sites, each application will be assessed on its merit within this general guide.

1 Defined under the Caravan Sites and Control of Development Act 1960 (as amended by the Caravan Sites Act 1968)
2 For the purpose of this Plan, a holiday chalet will be defined as any structure or suitable building intended for use as holiday accommodation, which is not defined by the statutory definition of caravan, that is:

  • when it is not possible to transport the structure to the site in one piece, and/or
  • that the structure/building prior to assembly is composed of more than two parts; and/or
  • that the structure is placed on a purpose-built foundation, and /or
  • that the structure, once assembled, cannot be removed from the site in one piece

View Comments (9) POLICY TWR4 HOLIDAY ACCOMMODATION

Proposals for new self-serviced accommodation, static caravans and chalets or proposals to extend the holiday season of existing static caravan and chalet sites will be granted provided It can be demonstrated that the accommodation is being used exclusively for holiday purposes and does not become the occupant's main or sole place of residence.

In cases involving extending the holiday season of existing static caravan and chalet sites, the following criteria must be satisfied:

  1. The accommodation and site is suitable for occupation during the winter months;
  2. The extended season would not increase the consequences of an extreme flooding event;
  3. The extended season will not have a detrimental effect on the local environment.

No Comments 7.3.67 Explanation:

As standards of the holiday units and facilities on sites improve, and demands within the holiday industry change there is pressure for the holiday occupancy period to be extended. The location of many static caravan and chalet sites occur in areas where the provision of permanent housing would be contrary to national and local planning policies which seek to manage development, for example in order to safeguard the open countryside. Some sites in the plan area may not be suitable for year round occupation because of the quality of their facilities, or due to the close proximity of an important habitat which requires protection at certain times of the year. Placing conditions on these developments can ensure that holiday accommodation is used for its intended purpose and does not become a permanent place of residence.

No Comments 7.3.68 An up to date register of the names of all owner/occupiers of the units and their main home address in order to ensure that the holiday units do not become the owner/occupier's main place of residence must be kept by all site operators.

View Comments (7) POLICY TWR5 TOURING CARAVAN, CAMPING AND TEMPORARY ALTERNATIVE CAMPING ACCOMMODATION

Proposals for new touring caravan, camping or temporary alternative camping sites, extensions to existing sites or additional pitches will be granted provided they conform to the following criteria:

  1. That the proposed development is of a high quality in terms of design, layout and appearance, and is sited in an unobtrusive location which is well screened by existing landscape features and/or where the units can be readily assimilated into the landscape in a way which does not significantly harm the visual quality of the landscape;
  2. Avoids excessive areas of hard standing;
  3. Have limited physical connection to the ground and is capable of being removed off the site out of season;
  4. Any ancillary facilities should, if possible, be located within an existing building or as an extension to existing facilities. If no suitable buildings are available, the need for additional facilities needs to be clearly demonstrated and commensurate with the scale of the development.
  5. That the site is close to the main highway network and that adequate access can be provided without significantly harming landscape characteristics and features;
  6. Occupation is limited to holiday use;
  7. That the site is used for touring purposes only and any units are removed from the site during periods when not in use.

No Comments 7.3.69 Explanation:


For the purpose of this policy 'touring units' includes touring caravans, tents, trailer tents and motor-caravans.

No Comments 7.3.70 The aim of this policy is to facilitate the establishment of high quality touring and camping sites in appropriate locations and recognises the contribution made by high quality touring and camping sites to the range of holiday accommodation available for visitors.

No Comments 7.3.71 Alternative forms of camping accommodation such pods, yurts, wigwams and tepees, have become more popular in recent years with visitors seeking a different camping experience. Permitting alternative camping proposals will lead to a wider range of tourist offer in the plan area that can benefit the local tourism economy.

No Comments 7.3.72 Although often in use for only part of the year, touring caravan and camping sites are often situated in prominent and open locations and can be very intrusive in the open countryside, particularly on the coast. Particularly heavily pressurised areas exist in many communities located on or near to the coast, including extensive parts of the Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The Council will require strong evidence that proposals for further units of accommodation in such areas will not add to servicing problems or harm the character or natural resources of these areas.

No Comments 7.3.73 Landscape setting, site layout, and screening will therefore be important considerations in assessing proposals. In all cases, the applicant will need to submit a landscaping scheme, as well as an improvement plan for extensions, with the application.

View Comments (1) 7.3.74 When not in use and during the winter months all units should be removed from the site. Touring caravan and camping sites are considered acceptable in land use planning terms as having less impact on the landscape than static caravans sites because, by their very nature, they have transient features which do not impose permanent, year round effects on the local environment.

View Comments (1) 7.3.75 In order to ensure minimum impact upon the landscape with proposals for alternative camping accommodation, all structures should be temporary, be capable of being dismantled and moved and should have limited physical connection to the ground. The use of concrete bases is not considered acceptable. Timber platforms or decking, which can be removed from the site if required, should be used. Where possible measures should be taken to restore the site to its original state when not in use.

View Comments (1) 7.3.76 In order to ensure that these temporary structures are being used exclusively for holiday purposes and do not become full time, permanent dwellings the structures should provide basic holiday accommodation. They should only provide basic facilities for sleeping, seating and eating without installation of water services or provision of drainage facilities for WC, showers and washing. This ensures that such structures do not generate a level of permanence that could increase the level of landscape impact and site restoration should removal of the structures be required. Additional facilities (if not already present) should be provided separately from the accommodation through the conversion or extension of an existing building(s). If no suitable buildings are available, the need for additional facilities needs to be clearly demonstrated by the applicant and commensurate with the scale of the development.

View Comments (1) 7.3.77 Any proposals that include structures with mains water and drainage will be dealt with under Policy TWR3.

View Comments (1) 7.3.78 Since the countryside looks very different during the winter months, a condition will be attached to planning permissions for all new sites approved, limiting the operational period of the site to between 1st March and 1st October of the same year.

No Comments 7.3.79 An unobtrusive location is defined as one which is well screened by existing landscape features and/or where touring units can be readily assimilated into the landscape without the need for excessive man made features such as hard-standing and fencing.

No Comments 7.3.80 B & Bs that operate within a residential dwelling (C3 use) will not be permitted to diversify in this way to avoid the proliferation of such structures within residential curtilages.

TOWN CENTRES AND RETAIL DEVELOPMENTS

View Comments (1) 7.3.81 Context

  • One of the Welsh Government's objectives for town centres and retailing is to promote established town, district, local and village centres as the most appropriate locations for retailing, leisure and other complementary functions
  • In deciding whether to identify sites for retail development local planning authorities should in the first instance consider whether there is a need for additional provision for these uses.
  • Development Plans should establish the existing hierarchy of centres identify those which fulfil specialist functions and be clear about their future roles.
  • The national and local economy and their retail markets have experienced significant change over the last decade or so. Whilst the recent economic recession has had a great impact, a long term structural change in the way people shop has been occurring as a result of change in consumer behaviour, technological advances and the emergence and growth of new out of centre retail developments and other shopping formats
  • The Isle of Anglesey County Council and Gwynedd Council each operate programmes that aim to improve some poor and underused buildings as well as enhancing the streetscape in an attempt to attract more shoppers and increase footfall into a number of town centres

No Comments 7.3.82 Introduction

The Plan's Settlement Strategy recognises the unique character and role of various centres in the Plan area. City and town centres are vital elements of the local economy and they continue to provide a focal point for communities. It is therefore important to ensure that there is a planning framework which safeguard and enhance the position of town centres as locations for retail and commercial services. Vibrant and active centres provide a mixture of uses including residential units, business activity, service provision, retail units, leisure and cultural facilities. The Plan has a role to play in supporting development that will protect and promote the vitality and viability of existing centres.

No Comments 7.3.83 The Retail Study (2013) undertaken to inform the Plan noted the strong influence of Bangor as a Sub-regional Retail Centre. The study also recognised that the area is serviced by a retail hierarchy which includes centres outside the Plan area, e.g. Llandudno and Chester. The study considered that there was limited quantitative need for some 372 sq. m. convenience floor space to be provided and distributed as set out below. However, in respect of comparison goods, the Study concludes that there was potential for some 9,353 sq. m. floor space to be provided over the Plan period.

No Comments 7.3.84 Village shops and community services (e.g. post office, pubs) are important to rural communities as they can provide for people's day to day needs, particularly for those who are isolated either by their location or circumstances. The Plan aims to safeguard and enhance such services and encourage the provision of multi-purpose community services where possible.

View Comments (7) STRATEGIC POLICY PS12 TOWN CENTRE AND RETAIL DEVELOPMENTS

The Councils will work with partner organisations and the local community to protect and enhance the vitality and viability of town centres in the Plan area in recognition of their retail, service and social functions in accordance with the following retail hierarchy:

GWYNEDD Sub-Regional Retail Centre Bangor
Urban Retail Centre Caernarfon, Porthmadog, Pwllheli
Local Retail Centre Abersoch, Abermaw, Bethesda, Blaenau Ffestiniog, Criccieth, Llanberis, Nefyn, Penrhyndeudraeth, Penygroes, Tywyn
ANGLESEY Urban Retail Centre Holyhead, Llangefni
Local Retail Centre Amlwch, Benllech, Beaumaris, Cemaes, Llanfairpwll, Menai Bridge, Rhosneigr, Valley

The Councils will promote the vitality and viability of city/ town centres in the Sub-regional Retail Centre, Urban Retail Centre and Local Retail Centre, by:

  1. Encouraging a diverse mix of suitable uses (as defined in PPW and TAN4) in high quality environments that attract a wide range of people at different times of the day, and which are safe and accessible to all;
  2. Ensuring that new investment will be consistent with the scale and function of the city/ town centre in accordance with the retail hierarchy;
  3. Facilitating the provision of 372 sq. m. net of new convenience floor space and 9,353 sq. m. net of comparison floor space by 2026 in the appropriate locations;
  4. Resisting development that detract from their vitality and viability and protecting against the loss of retail units within the Primary Retail Areas, as shown on the proposal maps;
  5. Maximising opportunities to re-use suitable buildings within town centres;
  6. Restricting the expansion of out-of-centre retailing and leisure development
  7. Encouraging sustainable links between the workplace, home and town centres.

Shops and services in Local Retail Centres and smaller villages that provide for the day to day needs of communities are safeguarded against their unnecessary loss and proposals for multi-purpose community services are supported.

View Comments (1) POLICY MAN1 PROPOSED TOWN CENTRE DEVELOPMENTS

Proposals for new retail, commercial and leisure development will be directed towards town centres, as shown on the Proposals Maps, in the first instance, provided that they are of a scale and type appropriate to the size, character and function of the centre in the retail hierarchy set out in Policy PS12.

Proposals for new retail, commercial and leisure development proposals within town centres defined on the Proposals Maps will be granted provided they conform to the following criteria:

1. They enhance the attractiveness, vitality and viability of the town centre,
2. The proposal, either individually or cumulatively, does not undermine the retail role of the centre;
3. The proposal use is in keeping with adjacent uses;
4. The proposal does not create an excessive amount of dead frontages.

Within the Primary Retail Areas, designated in Bangor, Caernarfon, Porthmadog, Pwllheli, Holyhead and Llangefni as shown on the Proposals Map, the change of use of ground floor premises (A1 shops) to any other use will be resisted

Retail and commercial proposals outside the defined town centres will need to be supported by evidence of need for additional provision and satisfy the sequential approach set out in national planning policy and accord with other policies in the Plan.

2 Convenience goods - Widely distributed and relatively inexpensive goods which are purchased frequently and with minimum of effort, such as petrol, newspapers and grocery items.

3 Comparison goods - Relatively high value goods, such as shoes, electrical equipment furniture, clothes where the customer makes a comparison between different shops

No Comments 7.3.85 Explanation:

Planning Policy Wales states that local planning authorities should identify an existing hierarchy of centres and highlight any which fulfil specialist roles.

No Comments 7.3.86 The Plan recognises that the centres identified above will continue to be the focus for retailing, commercial, cultural and leisure activities within the area. These centres are important for the local economy, ensuring that a variety of complementary functions are available, reducing the need to travel, being a catalyst for successful regeneration and helping to maintain sustainable communities.

No Comments 7.3.87 Retail and commercial development should preferably be located within the defined town centres identified above. First preference will be given to developing sites within the Sub-Regional Centre, Urban Regional Centres, followed by edge of centre sites and then Local Retail Centres. Proposals will be determined in accordance with the sequential approach set out in Planning Policy Wales and TAN 4.

No Comments 7.3.88 New retail and commercial development located outside of town centres can have a detrimental impact on the vitality, attractiveness and viability of existing centres. These impacts need to be considered when determining proposals for new retail development

No Comments 7.3.89 The vitality, viability and attractiveness of the town centres identified in the plan can be maintained and enhanced by ensuring that town centres identified in the retail hierarchy remain the primary focus for a wide range of town centre uses including (A1, A2 and A3), commercial and public offices (B1), community facilities and institutions (D1 and entertainment and leisure (D2). These latter types of town centre uses (B1, D1 and D2) will be encouraged to locate within identified town centres, but outside the identified Primary Retail Areas. The Primary Retail Areas in Bangor, Caernarfon, Porthmadog and Pwllheli, Holyhead and Llangefni as shown on the Proposals Map have been identified to safeguard and enhance their retail function.

View Comments (2) POLICY MAN2 PRIMARY RETAIL AREAS (RETAIL CORE)

Primary Retail Areas are designated in Bangor, Caernarfon, Porthmadog, Pwllheli, Holyhead and Llangefni as shown on the Proposals Map.

Proposed changes of use of the ground floor of premises in these areas from Class A1 shops to other uses will only be permitted where:

  1. It can be shown that the premises is no longer viable for A1 use and the retention of A1 use at the premises has been fully explored without success, by way of marketing at a reasonable market rate for a minimum of six months; and
  2. The proposed change of use does not have an unacceptable impact on the retail function or character, vitality attractiveness or viability or of the primary Retail area.

No Comments 7.3.90 Explanation:

Within the towns identified in this Policy, the majority of the ground floor units in the Primary Retail Areas are shops. The Primary Retail Areas are identified on the Proposals Map and their boundaries are based on the recommendations of the Gwynedd and Anglesey Retail Study (2013).

No Comments 7.3.91 The aim of this policy is to safeguard and enhance the vitality and viability of the Primary Retail Areas by controlling the number of non-A1 uses. An accumulation of non-A1 uses could pose a threat to the prosperity of Primary Shopping Areas.

No Comments 7.3.92 The Council recognise that some shops may become vacant and remain vacant for a long period of time. If a unit remains vacant for a long period it could have a negative effect on the vitality, attractiveness and viability of the area. One way the planning system can assist the recovery of Primary Retail Areas is to enable greater flexibility where long term vacancies are becoming a problem. When considering proposals for the change of use of a retail unit under such circumstances, clear evidence must be presented to show that the unit has been widely marketed as a shop for a continuous 6 month period at a fair price or rent and that no reasonable offer has been refused.

No Comments 7.3.93 It is considered that there are sufficient opportunities for encouraging a diverse mix of complementary uses within areas of the defined town centres that surround the Primary Shopping Areas.

No Comments POLICY MAN3 RETAILING OUTSIDE DEFINED TOWN CENTRES BUT WITHIN DEVELOPMENT BOUNDARIES

Shops located outside defined town centres but within the development boundary will be safeguarded by refusing proposals for other uses unless it can be demonstrated that all the following criteria can be met:

1. That there is a similar service available within reasonable walking distance;
2. If there is no similar service present, that the property has been on the market for a reasonable selling price or rent for a continuous period of 6 months;
3. That the new use will not have detrimental impact on the amenities of adjacent uses.

Proposals for new small scale convenience shops that meet the daily needs of residents for essential daily goods will be approved, provided that they do not jeopardise the viability and vitality of existing town centres in the retail hierarchy and do not form part of an industrial estate.

Proposals for major retail development and sub-division of existing retail units outside the defined town centre boundaries will only be granted provided they conform to the following criteria:


4. The development would not undermine the retail hierarchy set out in the in the Strategic Policies and detailed Policy MAN1; and
5. The development either by itself or in combination with other permitted or allocated retail developments would not undermine the vitality and viability of any of the centres;
6. Evidence of need for additional provision has been demonstrated;
7. The sequential approach set out in national planning policy and guidance and in the Plan has been satisfied.

No Comments 7.3.94 Explanation:

Retail development outside of town centres can jeopardise the vitality and viability of existing centres. The Local Development Plan will seek to limit the scale of retail development outside town centres whilst recognising the need to allow some development to help sustain communities particularly in rural areas. Existing shops outside defined centres can perform a vital role in meeting the daily needs of local people and it is important that such services are not lost.

No Comments 7.3.95 The Councils will support proposals for new small scale shops within development boundaries. Small scale is taken to be less than 200 sq. m. net as most corner shops would not exceed 200 sq. net.

No Comments 7.3.96 Proposals that are outside of the defined town centres will be determined using the sequential approach outlined in Chapter 10 of Planning Policy Wales. Proposals for retail uses on industrial estates unrelated to factories selling their own products will not normally be permitted because retail development in such locations can have the effect of limiting the range and quality of sites available for employment uses as well as having a detrimental impact on the vitality, attractiveness and viability of existing town and local centres.

No Comments 7.3.97 It is recognised that some types of retailing, such as stores selling bulky goods and requiring large showrooms may not be able to find suitable sites in town centres. Such stores should be located at edge of centre sites or where such sites are not available, at locations accessible by a choice of means of transport.

No Comments 7.3.98 Major retail proposals are considered to be any proposals above a net floor space of 500 sq. m. Any proposed additional floor space which would take an individual store to above 500 sq. m net will also be assessed under this policy. National policy establishes that a retail impact assessment must be submitted for retail developments over 2,500 sq. m gross floor space. In the case of Anglesey and Gwynedd where many centres have small retail provisions, more modest scale development can have a significant adverse impact on the vitality and viability of existing town and local centres. For this reason a retail impact assessment will generally be required for developments over 500 sq. m net. In some instances a retail impact statement may be requested for smaller units where it is considered that the development either alone or in combination with other retail developments could harm nearby centres. Requiring a retail impact assessment will help the Council assess whether there is a need for the development, the justification for selecting the site and the likely impact of the proposed development on the attractiveness, viability and vitality of the town centre.

No Comments 7.3.99 Planning Policy Wales establishes the approach to applying the needs and sequential tests for retail development.

No Comments POLICY MAN4 SAFEGUARDING VILLAGE SHOPS AND PUBLIC HOUSES

Proposals to change the use of a village shop or public house will be refused unless they conform to following criteria:

  1. A similar service is available within reasonable walking distance, or
  2. The applicant can demonstrate to the satisfaction of the Local Planning Authority that the existing use is no longer financially viable, by placing the property on the market for a reasonable selling price or rent for a continuous period of 12 months without success.

No Comments 7.3.100 Explanation:

It is important that the daily needs of communities are reasonably met in their locality. Provision of these services locally will reduce the need to travel and help sustain local communities.

No Comments 7.3.101 The applicant will be required to provide clear evidence to show that the unit has been permanently vacant or vacant for an extended period that it has it has been on the market as a commercial unit for a reasonable price or rent for a continuous period of 12 months and that no reasonable offer has been rejected, especially where a similar service is not available within reasonable walking distance.

View Comments (1) POLICY MAN5 NEW RETAILING IN VILLAGES

Proposals for the change of use of buildings to a small shop or proposals for new shops or extensions to existing shops will be granted provided they conform to the following criteria:

  1. The proposal makes a suitable use of an existing building or site;
  2. The proposed building or site lies within the development boundary of the village;
  3. The new development does not significantly harm the amenities of neighbouring residents or on the character of the area;
  4. The shop is easily accessible by foot, cycle and public transport;
  5. Parking arrangements are satisfactory and the development will not significant harm highway safety;
  6. The proposed use will not affect negatively on the vitality of any Sub-regional Retail Centre, Urban Retail Centre or Local Retail Centre.

No Comments 7.3.102 Explanation:

As well as safeguarding existing village shops, the Council is eager to see an improvement and expansion of small scale retail (less than 200 sq m net) provision in rural areas. Priority will be given to proposals that make of a suitable existing building or share a building with another service in order to reduce the potential impact of a new building. An important consideration when assessing any proposal will be the potential impact of the development on the vitality and viability of any Town Centre or Local Retail Centre. Any proposal which would undermine the retail hierarchy set out in the Strategic Policies will not be supported.

View Comments (1) POLICY MAN6 RETAILING IN THE COUNTRYSIDE

Proposals for small scale shops or extensions to existing shops outside development boundaries will be granted provided they conform to the following criteria:

  1. The shop is a subservient element of an existing business on the site;
  2. The shop will not significantly harm nearby village shops;
  3. Priority has been given to using an appropriate existing building;
  4. The new use will not significantly harm the amenities of neighbouring residents or the character of the area;
  5. The development is accessible via sustainable means of transport;
  6. Access and parking arrangements are satisfactory and the development will not significantly harm highway safety.

No Comments 7.3.103 Explanation:

Normally the most suitable location for shops is within the settlement boundaries of towns and villages. However, small scale shops that are run in conjunction with an existing business on the site, for example, a farm shop, a garden centre or a petrol station can provide a useful service to rural communities by offering a new source of services and employment close to rural homes. However, it is important that the shops should be 'subservient' to the existing business as this would ensure that the shop serves the existing business (rather than merely being sited on the same site) even where the extent of the retail activity is such that it represents a material change in use of the planning use. It is recognised that shops in the countryside can create additional employment opportunities and aid rural economic diversification as well as providing a service to local communities.

No Comments 7.3.104 In relation to criteria 2, the Councils may seek to use planning conditions to limit the range of goods sold or restrict the amount of floor space if this allows the development to proceed.

View Comments (1) POLICY MAN7 HOT FOOD TAKE-AWAY USES

Proposals for hot food take-away uses will be permitted provided all the following criteria can be met:

  1. The development will not generate excessive noise, smells or litter that will have an unacceptable impact on the amenities and character of the area;
  2. The development will not lead to an over concentration of this type of use in the immediate locality. and be detrimental to the vitality, attractiveness and viability of the area;
  3. The use is in keeping with adjacent land uses;
  4. The premises is easily accessible by foot, cycle and public transport;
  5. The development will not result in significant congestion or parking problems to the detriment of highway safety;
  6. Adequate and appropriate waste storage provision must be provided within the curtilage of the site;
  7. Extraction and ventilation systems must be designed so that they do not have an unacceptable impact on visual and residential amenity.

No Comments 7.3.105 Explanation:

Although it is recognised that hot food takeaway shops can provide an important complementary service, particularly in town centres for visitors and the night time economy, they are more likely to have a detrimental impact on amenity and on the retail character and function of shopping centres compared to other retail uses. Such harmful impacts relate to increased incidence of litter, smells, crime and anti-social behaviour, noise and general disturbance, parking and traffic problems.

No Comments 7.3.106 Applications for hot food takeaway shops will need to be assessed carefully as they can have a potential detrimental effect on the character of a retail centre and on the amenities of nearby users and residents. Such developments will have to be assessed in the context of adjacent land uses to ensure that they are in keeping with the area and will not have a negative effect on the locality. New hot food take-away premises should be easily accessible by foot, cycle and public transport and not reliant on customers arriving by car.

No Comments 7.3.107 In recent years, a number of premises have been converted into hot food takeaways. Where high concentrations occur they can pose a threat to the attractiveness, vitality and viability of the area. Clustering of hot food takeaways can break up the continuity of retail frontages and can detract from the retail function to the detriment of local residents. Thresholds where this kind of development will become unacceptable will have to be defined by examining the circumstances prevalent in a particular area. The existence of a similar development on the same street as the proposal as well as unimplemented permissions for hot food take-aways will need to be taken into account. Where development affects Primary Retail Areas, proposals will also be considered in the context of Policy MAN2.

7.4 SUPPLY AND QUALITY OF HOUSING

SCALE AND TYPE OF HOUSING

View Comments (2) 7.4.1 Context

  • A key aim of national planning policy is to create sustainable mixed communities for current and future residents.
  • Local planning authorities must ensure that sufficient land is genuinely available or will become available to provide a 5-year supply of land for housing.
  • Local planning authorities, in partnership with the community, including the private sector, must develop policies to meet the challenges and particular circumstances evident in their areas in specific locations.
  • The purpose of the Single Integrated Plan and each Council's Strategic/ Corporate Plan is to promote economic, social and environmental wellbeing in Anglesey and Gwynedd.
  • Through their Strategic/ Corporate Plans and their Housing Strategies, each Council seeks to facilitate the provision of an adequate amount of housing to satisfy the needs of local communities in terms of type and affordability.

View Comments (2) 7.4.2 Introduction


The Plan is expected to deliver one of the Government's key housing goals that aims to ensure that more housing of the right type be provided and that more choice should be provided. The creation of a healthy and balanced housing market is also a key objective of both Councils, and together with other strategies and programmes being undertaken by the Councils and other organisations, the Plan should ensure the use of land supports the delivery of sustainable communities.

View Comments (1) 7.4.3 Local authorities can identify the number of homes needed, but the number actually built each year will be heavily influenced by factors outside their control. The Plan period (2011 - 2026) includes a time of continued economic and financial uncertainty. Market conditions continue to be weak and this is likely to mean that house building in the short term will remain subdued. To help progress housing delivery in the short term each Council and its partners are exploring and/ or implementing local initiatives.

No Comments 7.4.4 Nonetheless, parts of the Plan area are anticipated to experience significant employment opportunities during the latter part of the Plan period (post 2018) as a result of the proposed investment in Wylfa Newydd, decommissioning of Wylfa A and other major infrastructure projects. Wylfa Newydd can be expected to provide employment opportunities for existing residents in the Plan area, adjacent communities and beyond. The Plan gives consideration to the linkages between economic and residential development.

No Comments 7.4.5 A range of sizes and types of new housing is as important as the overall amount. A variety of housing types and tenures within individual Housing Market Areas, and on each housing site where that is possible, creates sustainable mixed communities and helps avoid concentrations of types of housing. High quality design and construction is vital to create visually attractive and sustainable new housing which will remain a desirable place to live well into the future.

View Comments (1) 7.4.6 Given current and future circumstances, (e.g. possible effects of the so called bedroom tax, larger than expected household size, high affordability ratio) more concealed households are anticipated and for the foreseeable future at least, home ownership is only likely to be an option for those with high incomes and those with equity from other sources such as other family members or inheritance. So it is vital to maximise the supply of new affordable housing and Strategic Policy PS14 sets out the Councils' approach.

View Comments (1) 7.4.7 A high proportion of the forecast future increase in households in the Plan area will be of people aged over 65. Many of these will want to remain in their existing homes, but some are likely to want to move to a property designed especially for older people. Enabling older households to 'down-size' can release larger properties for occupation by families. This points to a growing requirement for older peoples' housing, delivered by a diverse range of providers in a variety of formats, recognising that the housing needs and desires of older people are as varied as those of the working population. Some of that housing may encompass varying levels of care provision including extra care.

No Comments 7.4.8 The provision of new student accommodation, if required, in appropriate locations in Bangor will release private housing which will thus become available to meet general housing needs.

No Comments 7.4.9 At this stage it is recognised that some of the new housing will only be possible if new/ upgraded infrastructure is provided. The Councils will work with infrastructure providers to remedy any shortfall in a timely manner.

No Comments 7.4.10 The following Strategic Policy aims to address housing issues around the number of housing units, affordable housing, type, mix of new homes and as well as ensuring that the needs and requirements of specific groups, such as the elderly are met.

View Comments (123) STRATEGIC POLICY PS13 HOUSING PROVISION

Based on the level of anticipated housing need, balanced against deliverability, environmental constraints and landscape capacity, the Councils will make provision for a requirement for 7,184 housing units between 2011 and 2026. This requirement will be met by identifying opportunities for around 7,902 housing units to enable a 10% slippage allowance.

A constant minimum 5 year supply of housing land will be maintained by allocating land and facilitating development on windfall sites and by using existing building in accordance with the following housing targets:

  1. a baseline requirement, which equates to 2,604 housing units between 2011 and 2018
  2. provision for growth, which equates to 5,298 housing units between 2018 and 2026

This level of growth will be distributed in accordance with Strategic Policy PS15 and policies TAI14 to TAI18 and will be monitored on an annual basis.

View Comments (10) POLICY TAI1 APPROPRIATE HOUSING MIX

The Councils will work with partners to promote sustainable mixed communities by ensuring that all new residential development contributes to improving the balance of housing and meets the identified needs of the whole community. Proposals should contribute to creating sustainable mixed communities by:

  1. Maximising the delivery of affordable housing (including for local need) across the Plan area in accordance with Strategic Policy PS14;
  2. Contributing to redress an identified imbalance in a local housing market;
  3. Ensuring the sustainable use of housing land, ensuring an efficient density of development compatible with local amenity in line with Policy PCYFF2;
  4. Ensuring the correct mix of housing unit types and tenures to meet the needs of the Plan area's current and future communities, and where appropriate be subject to a phasing requirement;
  5. Making provision, as appropriate, for specific housing needs such as student accommodation, homes for the elderly, Gypsy & Travellers, supported accommodation, nursing, residential and extra care homes, needs of people with disabilities;
  6. Improving the quality and suitability of the existing housing stock;
  7. Ensuring high standards of design that create sustainable and inclusive communities in line with Policy PCYFF2.

No Comments 7.4.11 Explanation:

New housing development should include an appropriate balance and mix of house types and sizes, including where applicable affordable houses and for those who wish to self build, to reflect identified demographic needs of the settlement or for Service Centres the area they serve. It is also important to address any under provision which exists in the current range of housing stock in the settlement or area. Facilitating more balanced communities, comprising of a range of ages, household types and incomes may also help achieve wider social policy goals, such as maintaining and strengthening Welsh speaking communities. Supplementary Planning Guidance will be published to provide advice on the matter.

No Comments 7.4.12 The Councils will consider information from a variety of sources, which include Local Housing Market Assessment, Housing Needs Studies, Common Housing Register, Tai Teg Register, Elderly Persons' Accommodation Strategy, 2011 Census and the 2011 Household Projections (this list isn't exhaustive) to assess the suitability of the mix of housing in terms of both type and tenure proposed on development sites.

View Comments (8) POLICY TAI2 SUBDIVISION OF EXISTING PROPERTIES TO SELF-CONTAINED FLATS AND HOUSES IN MULTIPLE OCCUPATION (HMOs)

The sub-division of existing properties to self-contained flats and HMOs that require planning permission will be granted provided they conform to the following criteria:

A: For Property within a development boundary or is a coloured building within an identified Cluster

1. The proposal doesn't involve a two storey terraced house;
2. The property is suitable for conversion to the number and type of units proposed without the need for significant extensions and external adaptations;
3. It will not result in an excessive concentration of such uses to the detriment of a residential area;
4. It will not have detrimental impact on residential amenity. In this regard, each proposal must demonstrate the adequacy of car parking, refuse storage space;
5. Where dedicated car parking cannot be provided the proposal must not exacerbate existing parking problems in the local area.

B: For Property in the Open Countryside

6. Consideration has been given to commercial / tourism / care accommodation in the first instance;
7. Property is of a size suitable for conversion and it is not viable to retain it as an individual dwelling;
8. The proposal does not have a detrimental impact on residential amenity;
9. Dependent upon viability evidence an affordable housing provision is given on an increase above one extra unit;
10. The site is located in a sustainable location.

No Comments 7.4.13 Explanation:

Planning permission is required to convert a house, flat or other properties into separate flats or bedsits or to build new properties of this kind, unless the proposal involves the provision of one flat above a shop. Where no more than 6 people are sharing the facilities (i.e. bathroom and kitchen) and the management of the household (i.e. paying rent and eating together), then this is deemed to be a 'shared house' and will not normally require planning permission. This may in some cases include households, where some care is provided or where a number of students live together. Self-contained flats or houses in multiple-occupation can help to address the needs of those wanting to purchase or rent small units of accommodation, as well as providing a relatively affordable housing option for those wishing to purchase their first property. Proposals for new build Flats /HMOs will be dealt with under policies TAI3 and TAI14 to TAI18 [allocations and windfall policies] with consideration given to the potential impact upon the character and amenity of the locality including cumulative impact under Policy PCYFF1.

No Comments 7.4.14 The provision of self-contained flats or HMOs can affect the residential amenity of adjoining properties. The accumulative effect or overprovision of these types of properties can affect the social character of an area and lower its environmental quality, thus detrimentally affecting the standard of living of other inhabitants. The situation can further worsen as families move out in order to seek a better living environment. The Council does not wish to see this happen (or continue in some areas). Therefore, it will not permit the conversion of two storey terraced houses into flats or HMOs on the basis that this type of development is likely to fully compromise the residential amenity of adjoining properties. The conversion of other properties will be refused unless proposals conform in full to the policy.

No Comments 7.4.15 The pressure for this type of development, as well as its consequences, can be clearly seen in Bangor and pressure also exists in other parts of Gwynedd and Ynys Môn where there are large houses e.g. Pwllheli, Abermaw, Caernarfon and Menai Bridge. The situation is manifest in Bangor, since this type of accommodation is ideal as student accommodation and consequently whole streets of houses are used in this way. Very often these buildings suffer from lack of maintenance and they do not contribute positively to the appearance of the street or area. This presents a significant challenge not only to the Planning Service but also to developers, landlords, students, local residents, the academic institutions and the various agencies that provide services in the area. This Plan will not, in itself, resolve all these issues. Continuing joint working with other parties will be imperative if the issues are to be fully addressed.

No Comments 7.4.16 HMOs in Bangor have traditionally been more concentrated in the Deiniol, Hirael and Menai wards. In order to create more balanced communities within Bangor, it is important to control the change of use of residential properties into HMOs.

No Comments 7.4.17 The cumulative impacts of HMOs can have adverse environmental and social impacts such as the accumulation of residual waste and increased traffic congestion due to high levels of on-road parking. Therefore, the cumulative impacts of clusters of HMOs can be considered to be a material consideration in the decision-making process.

No Comments 7.4.18 Criterion 4 refers to the effect on a residential area. The following datasets will be used to determine the proportion of properties not used as a 'shared house' as a percentage of all households. Data is included in Topic Paper 16 Student Accommodation. The data will be updated on a yearly basis to ensure that changes over time are captured and that the latest data can be used in determining planning applications. Applicants will need to take account of the current data on the date of their application. The Councils consider that non shared residential accommodation should not exceed 25% of residential properties in the electoral wards of Menai (Bangor) and Deiniol and 10% in the remaining wards in the Plan area.


i. Licensed HMOs - records from the Council's Licensing Team;
ii. The number of extant planning permissions for HMOs
iii. Council Tax exempt student properties ("shared housing")

No Comments 7.4.19 In circumstances where an applicant disagrees with the Council's assessment of the number of HMOs/ shared housing in a given area, then the applicant will be afforded an opportunity to provide evidence and demonstrate otherwise.

No Comments 7.4.20 Where a dwelling is located in an open countryside location evidence will be required to show that consideration has been given towards commercial usage prior to subdivision for residential use. The building should be of a sufficient size to be subdivided e.g. an old mansion, and that it is not viable to be retained as a single unit. Consideration will be given towards the impact on the residential amenity of other residential properties in the vicinity of the development. Supplementary Planning Guidance will be published to provide advice on the matter.

No Comments 7.4.21 If the proposal would create more than a single additional unit to the number of units on the site at the base date of the Plan then the development would be expected to contribute towards Affordable Housing in line with policy TAI9.

No Comments 7.4.22 For development in the open countryside the site should be located in a sustainable location being close to a service centre or on a public transport route.

View Comments (1) POLICY TAI3 NEW BUILD PURPOSE BUILT ACCOMMODATION, HOUSING IN MULTIPLE OCCUPATION AND OTHR HOUSING WITH SHARED FACILITIES FOR TRANSIENT CONSTRUCTION WORKERS

Proposals for new build purpose built accommodation, houses in multiple occupation and other housing with shared facilities for transient construction workers will be permitted provided that the following criteria are satisfied:


1. The site is located:


i. within or adjacent to development boundaries of Centres or Service Villages identified within the Plan's Settlement Hierarchy, or

ii. in exceptional circumstances, in other locations provided the developer can demonstrate that there is an essential and proven need for the amount and type of accommodation that cannot be met within or adjacent to development boundaries of Centres or Service Villages in the locality through either existing accommodation or the re-use of an existing building and the accommodation is provided to meet the temporary accommodation needs of workers;


2. It is proportionate in scale to the Centre or Service Village;


3. Is designed for permanent legacy use, unless, in exceptional circumstances, the Council is satisfied that a legacy use is not feasible;

4. It will not prejudice the Councils' ability to sustain a continuous minimum 5 years supply of land for self-contained homes;

5. It does not involve the loss of sites or parts of sites considered suitable for affordable housing or housing for older people or other persons with specific needs during the Plan period, including sites allocated for housing;

6. If provision of self-contained homes is the intended legacy use of the building(s), the proposal conforms to the requirements of Policy TAI9 and 10;

7. It is accessible to public transport routes, workplaces, and key social infrastructure;

8. A satisfactory standard of accommodation and adequate communal leisure and recreational facilities are provided on site to meet the amenity needs of occupiers

9. The accommodation, and the agreed legacy use, contribute to creating a mixed, inclusive and sustainable community, and does not cause an over-concentration of such a use in the local area or harm to the residential amenity or the surrounding area;

10. Buildings can be adapted for either future self-contained housing or future community or commercial use, which accords with Policy PCYFF1 and policies relating to the alternative future use, or

11. If an alternative use is not feasible the Council shall require that temporary buildings are removed and

i. the serviced land is left in a neat and tidy condition following the removal of the structures, or

ii. all waste disposal facilities, roads, parking areas and drainage facilities are permanently removed from the site and the land is reverted to its original state to the satisfaction of the Local Planning Authority.


Planning permission will always only be granted subject to a time-limited period in order to enable the Council to review the overall trend the construction project's associated accommodation needs. Appropriate planning mechanisms will be applied to secure the agreed legacy use.
Operators will be required to keep a register of all workers living in the accommodation and to make this register immediately available, on request, to the Council.

No Comments 7.4.23 Explanation:


Homes with shared facilities are often known as houses in multiple occupation (HMOs)/ shared homes. HMOs/ shared homes are flats or houses occupied by more than one household, where each household does not have exclusive use of all cooking, washing and toilet facilities. This Policy applies to the construction of new HMOs/ shared homes as opposed to the conversion of existing buildings (which would fall under Policy TAI2). This Policy applies to new build purpose built accommodation required in connection with large scale construction projects, e.g. Wylfa Newydd or any other work that requires a temporary/ transient resident workforce. The accommodation will be required for 6 months or more. The duration will be restricted to a maximum period agreed to by the Council and will be conditioned for refurbishment of the building/ structure or reinstatement of the site at the end of the period. The Council encourages accommodation designed to allow transition to an alternative legacy use.

No Comments 7.4.24 This type of accommodation has the potential to mitigate pressure on the stock of private rented homes or open market housing in communities. Policy TAI3 would not apply to any form of purpose built accommodation that has been designated as student housing or designated for use by older people or would be suitable for young adults with a limited income. Policy TAI6 provides part of the framework to deal with proposals for new purpose build student accommodation.

No Comments 7.4.25 The aim of this Policy is to achieve the appropriate balance by facilitating the development of HMOs/ shared housing and purpose built accommodation required for temporary construction workers and protecting the supply of housing suitable for local communities during the Plan period.

No Comments 7.4.26 The creation of mixed, sustainable and inclusive communities can be adversely affected where purpose built accommodation, HMOs or shared housing is proposed. This type of accommodation creates a concentration of relatively short-term residents, and can be unwelcome in an established community. Specific concerns can include pressure on services and facilities that meet the needs of longer term residents, particularly key services and facilities such as doctors' surgery, dentist, leisure centres, libraries, schools. The Councils are committed to supporting residential communities in the Plan area. Each application for temporary workers accommodation shall be accompanied by an assessment for the proposal, including:

i. a detailed explanation of the need for the facility


ii. how it accords with the Construction Workers' Accommodation Strategy

iii. details of the extent to which the proposal places demands on physical and community infrastructure

iv. the extent to which the local community will benefit from the proposal

v. a demonstrable solution for the end of the life of the structure or building, unless it can be clearly demonstrated that a legacy use isn't feasible.

No Comments 7.4.27 Where proposals for purpose built accommodation, HMOs or housing with shared facilities for construction workers are likely to impact adversely on the balance of the community because of their scale or because of an existing concentration, the Councils may seek mitigating measures in accordance with Policy ISA1.

No Comments 7.4.28 Where mitigation cannot be secured, the Councils will refuse proposals that would disrupt the balance of the community or prevent the local community's requirements from being met.

No Comments 7.4.29 The Councils will expect that the developer will ensure that purpose built accommodation and any facilities associated with the accommodation (e.g. recreational facilities) are developed on a sustainable basis, and that proposals identify the legacy opportunities / proposed after use for consideration from the outset. Where an alternative policy compliant legacy use is not feasible, but the proposal is otherwise acceptable, the planning permission for the accommodation will be granted for a limited period and a mechanism, e.g. planning conditions or planning obligations/ Section 106 agreements, will ensure that all temporary buildings, works, uses of land or other development, are removed or discontinued and the land reinstated in accordance with a scheme previously approved, or serviced plots are retained and the land is landscaped in accordance with an approved landscaping scheme. The Council may require that a bond is provided to ensure that the landscaping is maintained.

View Comments (3) Policy TAI4 RESIDENTIAL CARE HOMES, EXTRA CARE HOUSING OR SPECIALIST CARE ACCOMMODATION FOR THE ELDERLY

Proposals for residential care homes, extra care homes or specialist care accommodation will be permitted where:

  1. Residential care homes, extra care homes or specialist care accommodation are located within the development boundaries of either a Sub-regional Centre or Urban or Local Service Centre; or
  2. Specialist care accommodation, in exceptional circumstances, involves the re-use of suitable brownfield sites or buildings close to development boundaries and clear justification for its location is provided, taking account of the nature of the care required, transport impact, and it can be demonstrated that alternative sites are unsuitable and/ or unavailable is provided; and
  3. In the case of residential care homes and extra care housing, the site must be within reasonable walking distance to services and facilities within the Centre or a high frequency public transport route to the services and facilities; and
  4. The proposal will not result in an over provision of care accommodation compared to the needs of the locality.

No Comments 7.4.30 Explanation:

Both authorities are reviewing their provision of care homes and how this may be provided in the future. Due to changes in funding for care homes provision extra care facilities have become more popular throughout the country. Extra care housing is similar to sheltered housing, offering independent living but with the benefit of on-site care provision.

No Comments 7.4.31 The provision of good quality self-contained housing in an extra care housing setting may encourage older people to move from under-occupied family housing. Proposals for such schemes should outline how they will target residents from the local catchment to ensure local under-occupied housing is released rather than attracting people to relocate into the area.

No Comments 7.4.32 Where existing provision is sufficient to meet the reasonable needs of the locality, further development will be resisted. This will avoid pressure being placed on local Social Services providers and the loss of land for which may be required for other purposes.

No Comments 7.4.33 Working with key partners, including care and specialist accommodation providers, the Councils will proactively encourage providers to take the Plan's spatial strategy into account when developing their own strategies and plans. This will ensure that specialist accommodation is delivered in the most appropriate locations to serve the identified needs of the local community and specific groups. From a sustainable development perspective, the Councils consider that the larger scale settlements identified as either the Sub-Regional Centre, Urban or Local Service Centres are the most appropriate locations for care accommodation for the elderly as sites will be accessible to facilities such as shops, medical services, places of worship, public open space and other community facilities; Regard should be given towards the Plan's general policies in relation to the design of a proposal and its potential impact on the amenity of the locality.

No Comments 7.4.34 Residential care homes consisting of only a bedroom (and possibly a bathroom) but with everything else communal, including meals, would be considered as a C2 usage. Other developments based on self-contained accommodation with simply a warden and no direct provision of care would be considered as C3 usage. For an extra care facility to be considered as C2 usage there should be extensive communal facilities within the scheme. C3 developments will be assessed against Policies TAI14 - TAI17 and all other relevant policies in the Plan.

No Comments 7.4.35 Proposals which are considered as C2 usage will not be expected to contribute towards affordable housing provision. They will contribute to achieving the overall target for housing growth.

No Comments 7.4.36 Due to the lack of mobility of residents within Nursing Homes or Elderly Mentally Infirm establishments there is greater flexibility in terms of the accessibility of these specialist care accommodation on foot to services and facilities in centres. However regard must be given towards sustainable travel of the staff and visitors therefore potential brownfield sites or buildings outside the development boundary should be located on a high frequency sustainable transport route.

View Comments (19) POLICY TAI5 LOCAL MARKET HOUSING

New residential development within the development boundaries of the specific settlements noted below will be permitted provided that:

  1. The occupancy of the property is restricted to:
  1. Local market housing; and/or
  2. Affordable housing (in accordance with Strategic Policy PS14 and Policy TAI9)
  1. The size of the units comply with the defined maximum for the particular type of unit proposed;
  2. There are adequate arrangements available to restrict the occupancy of any local market house or affordable house in the first place and in perpetuity to those who conform to the relevant occupancy definition.

When a development is permitted, a planning condition will be used to manage Permitted Development Rights to ensure that an extension or alterations would not increase the size of the property beyond the defined accepted maximum size.

The Relevant Settlements:

i) Local Service Centres

Anglesey Gwynedd

ii) Villages

Anglesey Gwynedd

View Comments (1) 7.4.37 Explanation:

Proposals to provide new residential units within the development boundaries of Abersoch, Beaumaris, Rhosneigr, Aberdaron, Moelfre, Mynytho, Llanbedrog, Sarn Bach, Trearddur, Tudweiliog and Four Mile Bridge must comply with Policy TAI5 in combination with Policy TAI9. This policy is relevant to all types of developments that create a new residential unit or units and it is relevant to any scale of development. Whilst the affordable housing element corresponds with what is facilitated in policies TAI9, open market housing will not be permitted in the settlements that are named in this policy.

No Comments 7.4.38 Evidence set out in Topic Paper 17 Local Market Housing clearly demonstrates that intensive problems exist within the housing markets of the settlements that are named in this policy, which has a social and economic effect on these communities. By promoting only local market housing and affordable housing (Policy TAI9) within these settlements, the objective of this policy is to contribute to tackle the imbalance within the local housing markets and sustain and strengthen fragile communities. The policy responds to recognised factors that influence the relevant housing markets. It expands opportunities in the defined housing markets and secures a provision of units that meet the community's needs. Application of this Policy may also help achieve wider social policy goals, such as maintaining and strengthening Welsh speaking communities. Supplementary Planning Guidance will be published to provide advice on the matter.

View Comments (2) 7.4.39 The occupancy of local market housing will be restricted to those who are eligible, through a Section 106 legal agreement. The legal agreement will not restrict the value of the property as in the case of affordable housing. Rather, this policy will seek to control the value of local market units by managing the size of the properties. By managing the maximum size of local market units, the value of these units will be more compatible with the policy objective of sustaining the defined communities.

Table 15: Maximum sizes of residential units in relation to Policy TAI5

(Where there is no connection with a Registered Social Landlord or where the development is not subject to a Social Housing Grant from the Welsh Government)

Type of Residential Unit Local Market Housing
Single storey, 2 bedroom house 90m2
Single storey, 3 bedroom house 100m2
Single storey, 4 bedroom house 120m2
Two storey or more, 2 bedroom house 100m2
Two storey or more, 3 bedroom house 110m2
Two storey or more, 4 bedroom house 130m2
Two storey or more, 5 bedroom house 145m2
Garage additional 20m2

No Comments 7.4.40 For the purposes of the 'Local Market Housing' clause, 'local' is defined as follows:

Local Service Centres - Connection with the particular ward where the settlement is located or any ward directly adjoining it.

Villages - Connection with the particular ward where the settlement is located only.

'Connection with the ward' is defined as follows:

  1. An individual who currently lives within the relevant wards and who has lived there continuously for 5 years or longer; or
  2. People who are not currently living in the relevant wards but who have a long and established connection with the local community, including having lived in the area for a period of 5 years or longer in the past; or
  3. People who have an essential need to move to live close to relatives who are currently living in the relevant wards and who have lived there for at least the past 5 years or longer and who need support because of age or infirmity reasons; or
  4. People who need support because of reasons relating to age or infirmity and who need to move to live close to relatives who are currently living in the relevant wards and who have lived there for the past 5 years or longer; or
  5. People who genuinely need to live within a specific ward as a result of their work situation; or
  6. Any other criterion agreed in writing by the Senior Planning and Environment Manager, Gwynedd Council or the Head of the Planning and Public Protection Service, Isle of Anglesey County Council (whichever Local Planning Authority is relevant).

View Comments (4) POLICY TAI6 PURPOSE BUILT STUDENT ACCOMMODATION

Proposals for new affordable purpose built student accommodation by higher education institutions or private sector providers in suitable locations at a level agreed with the Council will be granted, provided they conform to all the following criteria:

  1. The proposal must be accompanied by an assessment of the number of additional full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students requiring accommodation, and should be supported by a higher education institution;
  2. The proposal is deliverable;
  3. The site isn't within a primarily residential area;
  4. The site should be located within a 15 minutes walking and reasonable cycling distance to the higher education institution campus, or alternatively, near to a high frequency bus route to the education campus;
  5. Proposals must not lead to a unacceptable increase in on-street parking in the surrounding area;
  6. Appropriate management is in place to minimise potential negative impacts from occupants or the development on surrounding properties and neighbourhoods, and to create a positive and safe living environment for students.

The Council will seek appropriate controls to ensure that approved schemes are occupied solely as student accommodation and managed effectively.

Management controls will be secured through the imposition of planning conditions or an appropriate legal agreement.

Purpose built student accommodation will not be permitted on sites with either an extant planning permission or allocated for residential development. A Preferred Search Zone is identified on the Proposals Map.

No Comments 7.4.41 Explanation:

Purpose built student accommodation provide an alternative to shared private rented housing or housing in multiple occupation, which left unmanaged can have serious social and environment impacts on residential amenity. Current purpose build accommodation is located on the University's campus and on or near to the High Street, Bangor. Topic Paper 16 Student Accommodation provides details of the existing provision and sets out the issues relating to the matter and how purpose built accommodation can assist in creating a more balanced housing market area, which in turn creates healthy and inclusive communities.

No Comments 7.4.42 The potential positive knock-on effects of the provision of appropriately located purpose built student accommodation are a greater balance between shared housing, HMOs and open market residential housing; more local people being able to purchase affordable open market residential housing; a reduction in on-street parking issues as there are likely to be fewer cars per property and a reduction in student related anti-social behaviour in residential areas.

No Comments 7.4.43 To avoid a potential oversupply of student bed spaces in purpose built accommodation, developers must undertake detailed appraisals on the level of need for additional student accommodation prior to formulating proposals, in order to gauge the appropriate levels of required bed space provision. Such appraisals should include, but not be limited to, waiting lists for existing places (both University and privately owned stock) and an appraisal of schemes in the planning pipeline (under construction with planning permission and current applications). Priority will be given to schemes that are part of the institution's plans or which are being progressed in partnership with the institutions.

No Comments 7.4.44 Assessing proposals for new purpose built accommodation against the criteria above will help ensure that proposals are developed in appropriate locations and help ensure that students reside in managed accommodation as opposed to HMOs. For purpose built accommodation in Bangor the Inset Map identifies a preferred search zone which includes part of the High Street towards Holyhead Road (subject to retaining commercial usage on the ground floor) Holyhead Road area and areas around the Ffriddoedd Road campus site.

View Comments (3) POLICY TAI7 REPLACEMENT DWELLINGS

Proposals for the replacement of a dwelling that meet the following criteria, where appropriate, will be granted:

1. Outside development boundaries or identified clusters, the present dwelling has a lawful residential use;

2. The building is not listed;

3. The existing dwelling is of no particular architectural and/ or historic and/ or visual merit, for which it should be conserved;


4. Outside development boundaries the existing dwelling is not capable of retention through renovation and extension and/ or it is demonstrated that the repair of the existing building is not economically feasible;

5. Outside development boundaries, the proposed dwelling is not a replacement for temporary residential accommodation or a building constructed of short-life materials;

6. Outside a Coastal Change Management Area, the siting of a replacement dwelling should be within the same footprint as the existing building unless it can be demonstrated that relocation within the curtilage lessen its visual and amenity impact in the locality;

7. Outside development boundaries, the siting and design of the total new development should be of a similar scale and size and not create a visual impact significantly greater than the existing dwelling in order that it can be satisfactorily absorbed or integrated into the landscape. In exceptional circumstances a larger well designed dwelling that does not lead to significant greater visual impact could be supported;

8. In areas at risk from flooding and outside a Coastal Change Management Area:

i) A flood consequence assessment has been undertaken for the development and satisfactory risk mitigation has been identified;


ii) The dwelling will incorporate flood mitigation and resiliency measures in accordance with Community and Local Government (CLG) publication Improving the flood performance of new buildings: flood resilient construction;

iii) he building must be appropriately designed to withstand and be resilient to hydrostatic pressure resulting from a breach/ overtopping of the tidal defences;

iv) A flood warning and evacuation plan has been prepared for the property and is to be displayed on site.

9. Exceptionally, when a recently inhabited or habitable dwelling is destroyed by accident, planning permission may be granted for a new dwelling, in situ. Evidence about the status and previous condition of the building and the cause and extent of the damage must be provided.


Planning permission for a replacement dwelling may be subject to a condition to ensure:

10. The demolition of the original dwelling and where appropriate the demolition of outbuildings on the completion of the new dwelling, and/ or


11. That permitted development rights are removed.

No Comments 7.4.45 Explanation:

For sites unrelated to the settlement hierarchy, and thereby identified as open countryside, stricter control is required over replacement dwellings in relation to its existing use right, replacement of a temporary structure and its visual impact.

No Comments 7.4.46 In open countryside locations the existing dwelling must have an established use as a residential unit otherwise it would be considered to create a new dwelling in the open countryside contrary to National Policy. Preference will be given towards the renovation of buildings with new build only being permitted when it is unviable to undertake such renovation work.

No Comments 7.4.47 This policy will not permit the replacement of a temporary residential accommodation such as caravans, chalets etc. or buildings constructed from short-life materials such as prefabricated houses.

No Comments 7.4.48 The proposed new dwelling would be expected to incorporate the footprint of the existing building unless it can be demonstrated that its relocation within the curtilage lessens its visual impact and it would not lead to an impact upon the amenity of adjoining uses. For sites located within a Coastal Change Management Area Policy ARNA1 would carry greater weight than this policy.

No Comments 7.4.49 In open countryside the proposed new build should reflect the size and scale of the existing building unless it can be demonstrated that the proposal would not lead to a significant greater visual impact and that the proposal would lead to a better designed dwelling.

No Comments 7.4.50 New build is directed away from flood risk areas, however, proposals for replacement dwellings that incorporate flood mitigation and resilient measures can be permitted.

View Comments (4) POLICY TAI8 RESIDENTIAL USE OF CARAVANS, MOBILE HOMES OR OTHER FORMS OF NON-PERMANENT ACCOMMODATION

New caravan or other forms of non-permanent accommodation sites

As an exception to Strategic Policy PS15 and Policy TAI9, a proposal involving the siting of caravans or other forms of non-permanent accommodation for the purpose of residential use will be granted planning permission provided they conform to (all) the following criteria:

1. The siting is for a limited period of time, and in connection with an approved building project; or

2. There is a proven need for temporary accommodation to assist in the establishment of a new rural based enterprise, in line with national planning policy and guidance.

In the case of scenario 1) above:


i) the siting of temporary residential caravans or other forms of non-permanent accommodation will be subject to the same locational considerations as permanent residential dwellings; and

ii) the site is located so as to minimise the need to travel and promotes the use of sustainable transport modes to the approved building project; and


iii) it can be demonstrated that the accommodation facilitates the delivery of the building project's accommodation strategy.

Existing holiday caravan or other forms of non-permanent holiday accommodation

A proposal involving occupation of existing holiday caravans or other forms of non-permanent accommodation outside the usual occupancy season or the extension of existing sites for the purpose of temporary residential use will be granted planning permission provided they conform to all the following criteria:

3. There is a proven need for temporary residential accommodation in association with an approved building project; and

4. The site is located so as to minimise the need to travel and promotes the use of sustainable transport modes to the approved building project; and

5. It can be demonstrated that the construction worker accommodation facilitates the delivery of the building project's accommodation strategy; and

6. It can be demonstrated that the proposal would not have a significant detrimental impact on the tourism industry.

Mechanisms to manage the development

Where planning permission is granted a planning condition will be attached, or an obligation will be secured, to ensure that:

7. Occupancy of the caravans or other form of non-permanent accommodation is confined to persons able to demonstrate the essential need for the accommodation; and


8. The resources required to ensure monitoring systems are established and any unauthorised activity can be adequately controlled is available; and

9. The permission is for a time-limited period only and, after which time the need for the accommodation ceases, the caravan or other form of non-permanent accommodation shall be removed from the site and either (i) the land restored to its former condition within a specified period, or (ii) serviced plots are retained for a future policy conforming use.

In the case of temporary residential caravans approved in accordance with this Policy, applications to renew temporary permissions will be assessed against the above criteria.

No Comments 7.4.51 Explanation:

Caravans and other forms of non-permanent accommodation are generally considered to be unacceptable as permanent homes within the Plan area. However, they may have a part to play in providing short term low cost accommodation for specific households provided that there is an essential need and the high quality of the environment of the Plan area is safeguarded and there are no overriding safety objections.

No Comments 7.4.52 Temporary permission for the residential use of a caravan or other forms of non-permanent accommodation may be given in association with and for the duration of building works, the establishment of a new agricultural enterprise or other similar site-based project. In accordance with the Plan's policies, permission would be subject to satisfactory arrangements for the provision of water supply, effluent disposal and other domestic services and the protection of the residential amenity of any neighbours. There may also be a requirement for caravans to be painted in an approved subdued colour or for appropriate screening to be introduced.

No Comments 7.4.53 Proposals for new sites associated with an approved building project will also be assessed against the same policies that apply to permanent residential development proposals. Residents of the caravans, mobile homes or other forms of non-permanent accommodation require the same access to services and facilities such as health, education, employment and retail therefore the same, considerations need to be taken into account. Therefore the sites would need to be within or adjacent to development boundaries of identified settlements.

No Comments 7.4.54 In certain circumstances, on agricultural holdings or other rural land based enterprises, there may be a special requirement for the use of a caravan or another form of non-permanent, for example, on a newly established farming enterprise, prior to permanent accommodation being justified.

No Comments 7.4.55 In assessing proposals that involve the temporary use of existing caravans or other forms of non-permanent accommodation particular regard will be had to the potential for loss of existing holiday accommodation within such sites.

No Comments 7.4.56 For major proposals there may be a short term requirement to use existing holiday caravan sites or non-permanent holiday accommodation. In such cases evidence is required over the need for the temporary residential use and how it would facilitate sustainable transport provision to and from the workplace.

No Comments 7.4.57 Proposals which lead to the extension of an existing site should have regard to other policies within the plan in particular the suitability of such extension in terms of visual impact.

No Comments 7.4.58 Proposal which can demonstrate how the temporary usage will help to upgrade the facilities on such sites and provide a long term tourism legacy for the area will be permitted.

No Comments 7.4.59 Such proposals will also have to show that it would not individually or cumulatively, with other similar proposals within an area, lead to a detrimental impact upon the tourism industry.

AFFORDABLE HOUSING

View Comments (1) 7.4.60 Context

  • Improving affordability is a key objective of national policy
  • National planning policy requires local development plans to set an informed target for affordable housing that can be delivered by the planning system and a likely development threshold size
  • Local planning authorities should balance the need for affordable housing against site viability
  • A key aim of national policy is to create sustainable mixed communities for current and future residents
  • Affordability is an issue across the Plan area
  • Evidence suggests that affordable need is greater in coastal villages particularly within the AONBs and along the Meirionnydd coast

No Comments 7.4.61 Introduction

The provision of affordable homes is an objective of the Plan. Providing affordable homes is also a priority of both Single Integrated Plans and is a key priority for both Councils. The majority of affordable housing that is built in the Plan area has been delivered as part of new development. Therefore, planning policies have a central role in helping to deliver low cost homes through quotas of affordable dwellings being negotiated and delivered on open market housing sites. Applying these policies can also contribute to achieving wider social policy goals such as maintaining and strengthening Welsh speaking communities. The following Strategic Policy and detailed policy sets out the circumstances for securing affordable housing, which will be supported by an Affordable Housing Supplementary Planning Guidance.

No Comments 7.4.62 Affordable Housing is defined in national policy as social rented, affordable rented and intermediate housing, provided to eligible households whose needs are not met by the market. Social and affordable rented housing is normally rented from a Housing Association. Intermediate Housing refers to housing which is available to buy or to part buy/part rent at below the market price. Planning mechanisms, such as Section 106 Agreements are used to control occupancy and prices.

No Comments 7.4.63 In May 2011 average house price in Anglesey and Gwynedd stood at approximately £170,471 and £169,780, respectively. While this is not considered high by national standards, when compared to average household income they are considered unaffordable. At entry level the problem is more pronounced and many local people, especially younger people, often find themselves priced out of the market. Despite the recent economic downturn the issue of housing affordability remains a key concern across the Plan area. Additionally over the last few decades 'Right to Buy' sales and the proliferation of second/ holiday homes have significantly reduced the supply of both social sector and market properties, available to meet local housing needs.

No Comments 7.4.64 A key theme of national policy is that local planning authorities can seek the provision of affordable housing through the planning system where there is strong evidence on need. In order to demonstrate the need for affordable housing within the Plan area, the Councils carried out Local Housing Market Assessments (LHMA), Housing Needs Study and an Affordable Housing Viability Assessment.

View Comments (1) 7.4.65 The Anglesey LHMAs and Housing Needs Study and the Gwynedd LHMA provide a snapshot of the scale of affordable housing likely to be required in Anglesey and Gwynedd, i.e. approximately 1,344 housing units per annum for 5 years to meet backlog and emerging needs (these figures are based upon Welsh Government methodology which calculates 25% of household income on housing costs). The current assessments also indicated that across the Plan area most of the need was for social rented units rather than shared ownership dwellings. 'Tai Teg', an affordable housing register, will be the main information source for intermediate/ shared equity schemes in the Plan area.

View Comments (2) 7.4.66 As the private sector is by far the largest house builder it is recognised that the provision of affordable housing can affect the profitability and the viability of housing development. The Affordable Housing Viability Assessment has been produced to demonstrate the levels at which housing development is capable of being delivered profitably while at the same time providing an appropriate level of affordable housing and tenure mix

No Comments 7.4.67 The results of the Affordable Housing Viability Assessment indicate that in lower market areas the land values and house prices make the delivery of affordable housing challenging. While, elsewhere in medium and high market areas land values and house prices suggest that development is capable of delivering higher levels of affordable housing without adversely affecting the profitability of sites. Furthermore, as market conditions improve, sites across the Plan area should be able to accommodate increased levels of affordable housing without impacting on profitability.

View Comments (7) STRATEGIC POLICY PS14 AFFORDABLE HOUSING

Sufficient land is identified to provide a minimum target of 1,400 new affordable homes.

View Comments (12) POLICY TAI9 AFFORDABLE HOUSING THRESHOLD & DISTRBUTION

The Councils will seek to secure an appropriate level of affordable housing across the Plan area by working in partnership with Registered Providers, developers and local communities to meet the minimum target presented in Strategic Policy PS14.


1 Threshold
Housing development, both new build and conversions, in settlements identified within the settlement hierarchy as shown in Strategic Policy PS15 will be expected to make an affordable housing contribution in line with the threshold figures introduced in the table below:

CATEGORY OF SETTLEMENT THRESHOLD
Sub-regional 5 or more housing units
Urban Service Centres
Local Service Centres
Service Villages 3 or more housing units
Rural / Coastal Villages 2 or more housing units
Local Villages
Clusters Only sites of 100% affordable housing will be supported within clusters.
Subdivision of Rural Dwellings 2 or more additional units

2 Percentage of Affordable Housing
The following percentage of affordable housing provision is expected within the Housing Price Area presented in the table below:

PERCENTAGE OF AFFORDABLE HOUSING HOUSING PRICE AREAS
At least 25% Gwynedd High Value Coastal, Rhosneigr, Beaumaris, Rural North West, Bridgehead, Trearddur & Rhoscolyn, South West, North East Rural, Larger Coastal Settlements, Rural Centres, Mid Rural, Northern Coast and South Arfon, Rural West,
At least 15% Llangefni, Llyn, Western Coastal & Rural Arfon, Holyhead, Amlwch & Hinterland, The Mountains, Eastern Gwynedd & National Park, Blaenau Ffestiniog.

See table in the explanation below in relation to which settlements fall within these areas.
Where the affordable housing requirement of a particular scheme falls below a single dwelling on the site then a pro-rata payment would be expected rather than no affordable provision on the site.


3 Other Matters

  1. All developments will be required to achieve an appropriate mix in terms of housing types and house sizes of local need affordable housing within a development, determined by the local housing market assessment or any alternative Council or partner assessment.
  2. Affordable units should be fully integrated within a development and indistinguishable from non-affordable housing.
  3. Where the viability of individual schemes fall short of the policy requirements specified, the onus will be on the applicant/ developer / landowner to clearly demonstrate on a viability assessment pro-forma the circumstances justifying a lower affordable housing contribution or tenure mix.
  4. That there are suitable mechanisms in place to manage the occupation of the affordable housing unit(s) upon initial occupation, and in perpetuity, to those who can prove a need for an affordable dwelling.
  5. If it can be demonstrated that there are no such eligible occupiers for rural enterprise dwellings then the housing will be occupied by those eligible for consideration for affordable housing.
  6. Extensions and adaptations to affordable housing will be permitted provided that the alterations or adaptations allow the house to remain as an affordable dwelling. Any extension or alteration should comply with the detailed policy on design.

View Comments (1) 7.4.68 Explanation:

The viability study together with an analysis of historic applications has identified the relevant threshold levels where an element of affordable provision will be sought from a proposal. Whilst on-site provision is the preference when a site triggers the threshold requirement but the scale of the scheme is below the level of a single affordable unit e.g. 6 units in a housing price area of 10% would equate to 0.6 of a dwelling, then a pro-rata contribution for the percentage of a new house will be sought i.e. 60% in this example.

View Comments (1) 7.4.69 Different House pricing areas have been identified in the Viability study. The Table below identifies into which House Price areas different settlements belong (Clusters not included since all development in Clusters will be for affordable housing):

HOUSING PRICE AREA MAIN SETTLEMENTS
Table 16: House Price Area
AT LEAST 25%
Gwynedd High Value Coastal Abersoch
Rhosneigr Rhosneigr
Beaumaris Beaumaris
Rural North West Cemaes
Bridgehead Llanfairpwll, Menai Bridge
Trearddur a Rhoscolyn No service centre in this area.
South West Newborough
North East Rural Benllech, Pentraeth
Larger Coastal Settlements Bethel, Bontnewydd, Caernarfon, Criccieth, Pwllheli,Porthmadog, Tremadog
Rural Centres Area within The Park
Mid Rural Gaerwen, Llanerch-y-medd
Northern Coast & South Arfon Bangor, Penygroes
Rural West Bodedern, Gwlachmai, Valley

HOUSING PRICE AREA MAIN SETTLEMENTS
AT LEAST 15%
Llangefni Llangefni
Llŷn Botwnnog, Chwilog, Nefyn, Y Ffôr
Western Coastal & Rural Arfon Abermaw, Deiniolen, Penrhyndeudraeth, Tywyn
Holyhead Holyhead
Amlwch and Hinterland Amlwch
The Mountains Bethesda, Llanberis, Llanrug, Rachub
Easter Gwynedd & National Park Area within The Park
Blaenau Ffestiniog Blaenau Ffestiniog

No Comments 7.4.70 Planning Policy Wales refers to affordable housing exception sites as small housing sites within or adjoining existing settlements for the provision of affordable housing to meet local needs. This is further clarified in TAN2 which states rural exception sites should be small (as locally defined in the plan), solely for affordable housing and on land within or adjoining existing rural settlements which would not otherwise be released for market housing.

No Comments 7.4.71 Due to the rural nature of the area exception sites will be considered for all the settlements identified in the Plan however they should be of a scale compatible to the role of the centre. The only exception should be if justification is provided to explain how a proposal serves a wider area than the settlement itself e.g. due to lack of opportunities in other settlements within the same area. Sites adjacent to the boundary should not form an unacceptable intrusion into the countryside or create a fragmented development pattern.

No Comments 7.4.72 In line with National Policy which seeks to restrict the amount of residential development in the open countryside approvals for Rural Enterprise Dwellings will include a condition that supports their usage as affordable housing when it can be demonstrated that there are no eligible occupiers for a rural enterprise.

View Comments (7) POLICY TAI10 EXCEPTION SITES

Where it is demonstrated that there is a proven local need for affordable housing that cannot reasonably be delivered on a market site inside the development boundary within a reasonable timescale, as an exception, proposals for 100% affordable housing schemes on sites immediately adjacent to development boundaries will be granted. Proposals must be for a small scale development, which are proportionate to the size of the settlement, unless it can be clearly demonstrated that there is a demonstrable requirement for a larger site, with priority given to suitable previously developed land,

In exceptional circumstances, subject to evidence that it is not viable to provide a 100% affordable housing to meet a proven local need for affordable housing on sites immediately adjacent to the development boundary, proposals for an enabled exception site will be granted provided that all the following criteria are satisfied:

  1. Only a minimum number of open market housing dwellings are included to make the proposal viable;
  2. The development is by or in partnership with a Registered Social Landlord and/or a Community Land Trust and/or the Strategic Housing Authority;
  3. The open market provision does not exceed the growth level anticipated within the Plan's settlement strategy.

No Comments 7.4.73 Explanation:

Planning Policy Wales refers to affordable housing exception sites as small housing sites within or adjoining existing settlements for the provision of affordable housing to meet local needs. This is further clarified in TAN2 which states rural exception sites should be small (as locally defined in the plan), solely for affordable housing and on land within or adjoining existing rural settlements which would not otherwise be released for market housing.

No Comments 7.4.74 Due to the rural nature of the area exception sites will be considered for all the settlements identified in the Plan however they should be of a scale compatible to the role of the centre. The only exception should be if justification is provided to explain how a proposal serves a wider area than the settlement itself e.g. due to lack of opportunities in other settlements within the same area. Sites adjacent to the boundary should not form an unacceptable intrusion into the countryside or create a fragmented development pattern.

No Comments 7.4.75 Even though there have been permissive exception sites policies for a number of years in both Anglesey and Gwynedd there has only been limited development delivered through these policies. Further information is provided in Topic Paper 3 Population and Housing.

No Comments 7.4.76 Paragraph 4.2.2 of TAN6 states that "Planning authorities should employ all available policy approaches, in an innovative way, to maximise the supply of affordable housing as defined in TAN2."

No Comments 7.4.77 A reduction in the availability of social housing grants and the need for authorities to be innovative in delivering affordable housing provision has led to the inclusion of an enabled exception sites element to policy TAI10.

No Comments 7.4.78 The enabled exception sites is seen as an innovative way to ensure that proposals by or in partnership with a Registered Social Landlords and/or a Community Land Trust (CLT) and/or the Strategic Housing Authority are viable and can therefore be brought forward to deliver a proven local need for affordable housing.

View Comments (1) 7.4.79 Proposals should be supported by robust evidence that the proposal would not be viable without an open market element as part of the proposal. The number of open market units should be the least amount required. The onus will be on the developer to provide evidence to satisfy the local planning authority that it is not viable to develop an exception sites without an element of open market provision. Any open market element justified in such a proposal should be of a scale and type to meet the communities need for market development and not lead to an over provision within the settlement.

No Comments 7.4.80 In settlements identified under policy TAI5 as Local Market housing the open market element on an enabled exception sites within these settlements will have to comply with policy TAI5.

No Comments 7.4.81 Consideration will be given towards the settlement strategy and the expected growth level when considering the impact of any open market provision as part of a proposal considered under this policy.

No Comments 7.4.82 A CLT is a not-for-profit, community organisation run by local people to develop housing and other assets at permanently affordable levels for long-term community benefit. It is a constituted, legal entity with the ability to hold and manage assets, and is defined in law.

View Comments (1) 7.4.83 It is imperative that the affordable housing developed on an enabled exception site are completed concurrently with the market housing. The development of these sites should not be phased and there should not be a time gap between the completion of the market housing and the completion of the affordable housing.

GYPSY AND TRAVELLER ACCOMMODATION

No Comments 7.4.84 Context

  • The Housing (Wales) Act 2014 places a duty on local authorities to provide sites for Gypsies and Travellers where a need has been identified.
  • The Welsh Assembly Government Circular 30/07 Planning for Gypsy and Traveller Caravan Sites strengthened the requirement that local authorities identify and make provision for appropriate sites in their local plans.
  • The Welsh Government's 'Travelling to a Better Future' sets out a detailed policy framework for Councils.
  • There are occurrences of unauthorised encampments within the Plan area.
  • Evidence suggests that there is a need for permanent and temporary Gypsy and Traveller sites in appropriate locations within the Plan area.

No Comments 7.4.85 Introduction

It is widely accepted that there is a national shortage of authorised sites for Gypsies and Travellers. This has led to an increasing incidence of unauthorised encampments and has sometimes created tensions between Gypsies and Travellers and the settled community. The supply of authorised sites, in appropriate locations, will help address the cycle of eviction that can be costly, and does not address the underlying need for a home.

No Comments 7.4.86 National policy places a responsibility for Local Authorities to set out the strategy and the criteria to be used to guide the development of Gypsy and Traveller sites in the Plan area.

No Comments 7.4.87 There is currently one authorised local authority owned residential Gypsy site at Llandygai, near Bangor with capacity for 7 pitches. There is also a tolerated Travellers site near Pentraeth, where 11 caravans are sited. It is considered that this site offers unsatisfactory living conditions and therefore should be relocated to a more appropriate site.

No Comments 7.4.88 Local authorities were required to assess the accommodation needs of Gypsy and Traveller families under Sections 225 and 226 of the Housing Act 2004. Where there is an assessment of unmet need for Gypsy and Traveller accommodation in the area authorities should identify sufficient sites in local development plans to ensure that the identified pitch requirement for residential and transit use can be met

No Comments 7.4.89 In accordance with the Housing Act 2004, the North West Wales and Flintshire Gypsy and Traveller Accommodation Needs Assessment (GTANA) (2011) was undertaken for all the North Wales Local Planning Authorities apart from Wrexham (who had undertaken a separate study).

View Comments (2) 7.4.90 The findings of the GTANA indicate that there is a requirement for 11 residential pitches to replace the existing tolerated site near Pentraeth and a requirement for an additional 10 residential pitches in Gwynedd. The GTANA has calculated that 28 'transit' pitches are required in North Wales to be shared between the Local Authorities. There are currently no authorised transit sites in North Wales. 'Transit' pitches can either be on formal sites that are similar to permanent residential sites but the occupier can only stay up to 3 months. Alternatively they can be temporary stopping places. Conwy County Borough Council and Denbighshire County Council are currently working together to identify permanent residential Gypsy and Traveller site as well as a formal transit site.

No Comments 7.4.91 Under the new Housing (Wales) Act 2014 another GTANA will need to be undertaken in 2015 to comply with Welsh Government requirements. The completion of the new assessment may result in changes in the number of additional pitches required over the Plan period.

No Comments 7.4.92 This process provides equity between Gypsies and Travellers and the settled community, because the same process for other types of housing need and homelessness is followed. By not providing for the identified need, Gypsies and Travellers may have to resort to unauthorised sites, which can cause tensions.

View Comments (2) POLICY TAI11 SAFEGUARDING EXISTING GYPSY AND TRAVELLER SITES

The existing Gypsy site at Llandygai, Bangor, as shown on the Proposals Map, is safeguarded as a permanent residential site to be solely used by Gypsies.


Any new Gypsy or Traveller sites granted planning permission and operated shall also be safeguarded for Gypsies or Travellers use.


Planning permission will be refused for an alternative use on a safeguarded site unless an alternative, replacement site has been identified and developed to provide facilities of an equivalent or improved standard (including its location) whilst there remains a need for such sites as evidenced by the Gypsy and Traveller Accommodation Needs Assessment or the best available evidence.

No Comments 7.4.93 Explanation:

The policy proposes that sites that have permanent planning permission for Gypsy or Traveller residential use, or are granted such permission in the future, will be safeguarded. This will ensure that the permitted use as a Gypsy or Traveller site is not lost to an alternative use, unless material planning considerations indicate otherwise.

No Comments POLICY TAI12 GYPSY AND TRAVELLER SITE ALLOCATIONS

To contribute to fulfilling the identified need for Gypsy and Traveller pitches as shown in the Gypsy and Traveller Accommodation Needs Assessment the following location, as shown on the Proposals Map, has been identified for potential development for permanent residential Gypsy or Traveller use, to be solely occupied by Gypsies or Travellers:

Permanent Gypsy or Traveller Sites

Location

Number of

Pitches

Occupants
Extension to existing site at Llandygai, Bangor 5 Gypsies

The Councils are applying a Gypsies and Travellers Sites Assessment Methodology to identify sites for an additional 16 permanent residential pitches as well as a series of temporary stopping pitches for Gypsies and Travellers in accordance with the Accommodation Needs Assessment Study.

No Comments 7.4.94 Explanation:

Some Gypsy and Traveller families, for various reasons, live in one place for longer periods of time. Permanent residential accommodation will be provided to those families and individuals that demonstrate that they have a genuine connection to the Plan Area and have no alternative place to live (this assessment is carried out by Housing Services). Occupants will be provided with pitches on a year round basis paying rent and council taxes to the Local Authority.

No Comments 7.4.95 In order to ensure that sufficient land is available to meet accommodation needs in the Plan area, the Councils conducted 'a call for sites' in 2014, inviting landowners to submit details of land for consideration as a Gypsy and Traveller site. Two sites located within Snowdonia National Park (which is outside this Plan's area) were submitted and were discounted by the Snowdonia National Park Planning Authority after applying the site assessment methodology.

No Comments 7.4.96 A potential expansion to the existing permanent site at Llandygai, Bangor is being explored. It is anticipated that 5 permanent residential pitches could be accommodated on this extension to the existing site. This means that at this stage there is a shortfall of 5 permanent residential pitches in Gwynedd and 11 pitches in Anglesey. The Councils will consult on options to satisfy the shortfall during 2015.

Permanent Residential Pitches

View Comments (1) 7.4.97 Local planning authorities are required to ensure that sites are sustainable economically, socially and environmentally. In order to identify the most appropriate sites, each potential site will be subject to an assessment process, which is in five stages:

i) Identify data sources;

ii) Establish search areas, which includes consideration of the preferences of the Gypsy and Traveller communities as indicated in the GTANA;

iii) Initial filter of sites, which involves consideration of its size and major constraints, e.g. national or international nature conservation designations;

iv) Detailed site assessment, which looks at environmental issues, accessibility, site context and character and an assessment against the Sustainability Assessment and the Habitat Regulation Assessment objectives;

v) Final schedule of sites

Temporary Stopping Sites

No Comments 7.4.98 The ideal size of a residential site should generally be no more than 12 pitches (Good Practice Designing Gypsy Traveller Sites 2009; the Welsh Government has recently been consulting on a revised version of this guidance note).

View Comments (1) 7.4.99 Council records indicate that there have been occurrences of up to 15 caravans stopping at any one time on the same site in the Plan area for relatively short periods. However, most of the unauthorised encampments have involved much smaller numbers of caravans. Providing one transit/stopping site that could accommodate up to 15 pitches and the provision of a number of temporary stopping places along routes through the Plan area commonly used by Gypsies and Travellers that could accommodate up to a maximum of 6 units is being explored. The advantage of the latter approach is that number of units on one site would be limited by the size of the site and that there will be a series of sites located along commonly used routes. Whatever the results of the search work the sites will provide for the intermittent needs for site accommodation, for which a charge may be levied as determined by the Councils. The stopping site(s) would not be occupied all year around and they wouldn't be able to be occupied by Gypsies or Travellers for more than 5 days. The following section sets out the criteria that will be applied to select the development of temporary stopping places for Gypsies and Travellers:

  1. The site must be within 2km of main transport routes or their junctions;
  2. The access to and from the site must be of sufficient quality and size to enable access onto and off the site by heavy vehicles, such as trailers;
  3. Sites should be able to accommodate towing caravans, parking spaces for other vehicles, and easy manoeuvrability.

No Comments 7.4.100 The following services and facilities will be provided:

i) A cold water supply to be provided which may be by use of water standpipe.

ii) Portable toilets with separate provision for men and women.

iii) A sewerage disposal point.

iv) Refuse disposal facilities.

v) Drainage infrastructure.

Appropriate lighting to enable safe movement, but avoiding light pollution.

Further information about the assessment process is included in Topic Paper 18 Identifying Gypsy and Traveller sites, which is published alongside the Plan.

View Comments (1) POLICY TAI13 SITES FOR GYPSY AND TRAVELLER PITCHES

View on map

Proposals for new permanent residential Gypsy or Traveller sites and extensions to existing authorised sites for Gypsies and Travellers will be granted on land that would not otherwise be released for residential development provided they conform to all the following criteria:

  1. A genuine local need is identified;
  2. That necessary transport and social infrastructure are accessible or can be readily provided;
  3. Cannot be accommodated on an existing authorised site;
  4. That environmental factors including high risk of flooding, ground stability, contaminated land, and proximity to hazardous locations do not make the site inappropriate for residential development;
  5. It is capable of being serviced with water, electricity, and waste management;
  6. The design of the development demonstrates that due regard has been taken to the Welsh Government Good Practice Guide in Designing Gypsy Traveller Sites;
  7. There would be no unreasonable impact on the character and appearance of the surrounding areas including impact on residential amenity of neighbouring occupiers or the operating conditions of existing businesses;
  8. There are no adverse effects on areas designated as being of international or national importance for biodiversity and landscape;
  9. That satisfactory arrangements are in place to restrict the occupancy of the pitches to Gypsies or Travellers.

No Comments 7.4.101 Explanation:

Many Gypsy and Traveller families have a cultural aversion to living in bricks and mortar accommodation. This aversion has been recognised in the law courts and means that every Local Authority in Wales must view Gypsy and Traveller accommodation as a form of affordable housing.

No Comments 7.4.102 Planning Policy Wales allows for the release of sites for affordable housing, including Gypsy and Traveller accommodation, as an exception to normal housing policies. This policy has been framed to address the difficulties Gypsies and Travellers may face in securing an adequate supply of affordable land for their needs. The purpose of this policy is to enable the release of land outside development boundaries for affordable Gypsy or Traveller accommodation where residential accommodation would not normally be approved. Land values outside the development boundaries are generally substantially lower than land values within the development boundaries, thus reducing overall development costs in order to help provide affordable pitches. These sites could provide a small additional source of affordable accommodation for Gypsies and Travellers in rural areas to meet local need

No Comments 7.4.103 This criteria based policy, as well as all other relevant policies in the Plan, will be applied to assess proposals submitted in order to meet future or unexpected demand.

View Comments (1) 7.4.104 Evidence is expected to support a planning application in order to show that there is a genuine local need for this type of accommodation. Gypsy and Traveller families will need to demonstrate a genuine local connection and genuine need to locate in the area. The Plan's general planning Policies will also be relevant in terms of this.

View Comments (1) 7.4.105 The Local Planning Authority will require a legal obligation through a Section 106 Agreement restricting the occupancy of pitches to local Gypsy or Traveller households who live in the area or with family or work connections in need of affordable pitches.

LOCATION OF HOUSING

No Comments 7.4.106 Context

  • National planning policy advises that local development plans should secure a sustainable settlement pattern which meets the needs of the economy, the environment and health, while respecting local diversity and protecting the character and cultural identity of communities.
  • Local development plan policies should seek to reduce the need to travel and maximise the use of alternative forms of transport.
  • There is a need to constrain non-essential development in the open countryside.
  • Local development plan policies should aim to create sustainable mixed communities.
  • A key aim of the Plan is to seek to ensure a reasonable geographical spread of housing and employment development, maximising access to jobs and key services and facilities.

No Comments 7.4.107 Introduction

Strategic Policy PS15 sets out the broad approach to the location and distribution of development within the Plan area. The Plan's spatial strategy as set out in the Chapter 6 is crucial in guiding growth in the Plan area over the Plan period. Strategic Policy PS15 sets out the broad approach to the location and distribution of housing development within the Plan area. It defines the role of towns and villages and describes the type of housing that could be permitted in the countryside. Additionally, paragraphs 7.4.130 and 7.4.131 of the Plan set out the national planning policy context for dealing with proposals for new housing in the countryside.

No Comments 7.4.108 Strategic Policy PS15 also outlines the hierarchy for service provision and investment, the spatial distribution of housing and employment growth.

No Comments 7.4.109 The preferred option for the spatial strategy seeks to ensure that, where possible, the majority (55%) of residential development will be located within or adjacent to the existing Sub Regional Centre and the Urban Service Centres as they provide the best range of services, employment opportunities and access to public transport. This approach makes the most use of existing infrastructure, reduces the need to travel and ensures the ongoing sustainability of these Centres.

No Comments 7.4.110 However, the preferred option recognises that smaller Centres (i.e. the Rural Service Centres) and Villages, if they are to remain sustainable, should have the opportunity where appropriate to accommodate new development. Nonetheless not all Villages are alike. Main Villages are considered to provide a higher level of facilities and services than the Remoter Villages and generally have greater sustainable access to and a functional link with higher order Centres. At this stage it is considered that some of these Main Villages can absorb some growth that would normally be directed to a higher order Centre. It is important that their existing role, level of facilities and services are protected wherever possible. In contrast, due to either location or comparatively lower level of key services, smaller schemes are considered more appropriate in the Remoter Villages. Evidence suggests that communities in Coastal Villages face more challenges in terms of accessing the local housing market, - a challenge that is heightened by the Villages' popularity for second/ holiday home owners. Development in these Villages needs to be of an appropriate scale and type to address community need for housing and to safeguard the Welsh language and culture.

No Comments 7.4.111 In order to address some of the local need for housing outside the Centres and Villages, named Clusters that can accommodate small-scale infill development only are also identified in the Settlement Strategy.

No Comments 7.4.112 The principles underpinning how future growth will be distributed reflects the role of the Centres, Villages and Clusters and their relationship with each other, ensuring that the scale of development is appropriate to the size of the settlement and that environmental, linguistic and infrastructure capacity is accounted for.

View Comments (4) 7.4.113 The following tables provide a breakdown of the Plan's proposed growth. Figures are based upon the growth level of 7,184 units with a slippage allowance of 10% (7,902 units in total).

Type of Settlement Number of Settlements Percentage of the Growth Number of Units
Table 17: Distribution of Housing Growth within the Plan
Sub-Regional Centre & Urban Service Centres 8 Up to 55% 4,346
Local Service Centres 20 At least 20% 1,580
Villages 87 1,502
Clusters 112 No more than 25% 224
Open Countryside - 250

Type of Settlement Number of Settlement Units Required Units Completed Units with Planning Permission1 Additional Number Required
Table 18: Position since Base Date of the Plan 2011 - Anglesey (2014 figures)
Urban Service Centres 3 2,039 141 480 1,418
Local Service Centres 10 790 146 235 409
Service Villages 3 120 2 54 64
Villages 30 616 89 290 237
Clusters 51 102 39 106 -43
Open Countryside - 150 86 205 -141
TOTALS 97 3,817 503 1,370 1,944

1This figure does not include sites unlikely to be completed within the Plan Period.

Type of Settlements Number of Settlements Units Requried Units Completed Units with Planning Permission1 Additional Number Required
Table 19: Position since Base Date of the Plan 2011 - Gwynedd (2014 figures)
Sub-Regional Centre & Urban Service Centres 5 2,306 172 740 1,394
Local Service Centres 10 790 89 368 333
Service Villages 8 320 21 57 242
Villages 46 446 144 232 75
Clusters 61 122 12 35 75
Open Countryside - 100 30 44 26
TOTALS 130 4,084 468 1,476 2,140

1This figure does not include sites unlikely to be completed within the Plan Period.

No Comments 7.4.114 These tables will provide a context and basis over the number of additional units required within the different categories which will link with the schedule of allocated sites and windfall provision in the detailed policies below.

Snowdonia National Park Local Development Plan Policy

No Comments 7.4.115 A substantial part of southern Gwynedd is located within the Snowdonia National Park. Y Bala and Dolgellau are designated as Centres in the adopted Eryri Local Development Plan and as such provide opportunities to satisfy housing need in Community Council areas immediately outside or straddling the National Park's boundaries, as well as areas within the National Park.

View Comments (33) STRATEGIC POLICY PS15 STRATEGAETH ANEDDLEOEDD

Housing development is distributed in accordance with the following settlement strategy based on a settlement's levels of service provision, function and size (population) and subject to its environmental, social and infrastructure capacity to accommodate development:

CATEGORY TYPE OF DEVELOPMENT
Main Centres - Up to 55% of the Plan's Growth located within:
i) Sub-regional Centre A higher proportion of new development required will take place within the Sub-regional centre and Urban Service Centres. This will be through commitments and new allocations including allocating strategic housing sites (open market housing with a proportion of affordable provision). In addition windfall sites within the development boundary can be permitted.
ii) Urban Service Centre
Local Service Centres - At least 20% of the Plan's Growth located within:
iii) Local Service Centres This will be through commitments and new allocations including allocating key housing sites (open market housing with a proportion of affordable provision). In addition windfall sites within the development boundary can be permitted.
Villages and Clusters - No more than 25% of the Plan's Growth located within:
iv) Service Villages Higher level of housing will occur within this category compared to other types of Villages. This will be delivered through commitments and new allocations (open market housing with a proportion of affordable provision). In addition windfall sites within the development boundary can be permitted.
v) Local Villages Development will be restricted to a scale and type to address community need for housing on windfall/ infill plots within development boundaries. No open market housing sites will be allocated in these Villages.
vi) Coastal Villages
vii) Rural Villages
viii) Clusters Over the Plan period there will be no allocation for development within the named Clusters. Local need affordable housing units will be permitted on infill or extension plots in acceptable and sustainable locations. There will not be a development boundary for the Clusters and only sites adjacent to a coloured dwelling (on the inset maps) will be considered.
ix) Open Countryside Only housing development that complies with Planning Policy Wales and TAN6 will be permitted in the Open Countryside.

No Comments 7.4.116 Explanation:

All of the sites allocated within the Plan have been subject to evaluation and consultation in line with the Candidate site methodology. This should ensure that all of the allocations are suitable for housing with no obvious barriers to their development and that they are actually available.

No Comments 7.4.117 An Urban Capacity Study has been undertaken in the Sub-Regional Centre and Urban and Local Service Centres to ensure that there are sufficient opportunities to meet the Plan's housing target through windfall provision in the larger settlements.

View Comments (9) POLICY TAI14 HOUSING IN SUB-REGIONAL CENTRE AND URBAN SERVICE CENTRES

In the Sub-Regional Centre of Bangor and the following Urban Service Centres

Anglesey
Amlwch, Holyhead, Llangefni


Gwynedd
Blaenau Ffestiniog, Caernarfon, Porthmadog, Pwllheli

Housing to meet the Plan's strategy will be delivered through:

(i) Allocations

The following sites are identified as Housing Allocations:

Sub-Regional Centre

Centre Site Reference Number Site Name Indicative Growth Level

Permission

(Apr 2014)

Bangor View Comments (1) T1 Goetra Uchaf 245 Yes
View Comments (4) T2 Former Friars School Playing Field 43 No
View Comments (2) T3 Former Jewsons Site 17 No
View Comments (4) T4 Former Crossville Site 16 No
View Comments (5) T5 Land Opposite the Crematorium 72 No

Urban Service Centres

Centre Site Reference Number Site Name Indicative Growth Level

Permission

(Apr 2014)

Amlwch View Comments (2) T6 Land near Maes Mona 50 No
View Comments (2) T7 Land near Lôn Bach 73 No
View Comments (2) T8 Land at Fferm Madyn 152 No
View Comments (2) T9 Land near Cae Rheinwas 40 No
View Comments (3) T10 Land at Tan y Bryn 58 No
Holyhead View Comments (1) T11 Tyddyn Bach 123 Yes
View Comments (6) T12 Land near Cae Rhos 53 No
View Comments (4) T13 Land near Yr Ogof 72 No
View Comments (3) T14 Land near Fferm Tyddyn Bach 49 No
View Comments (1) T15 Land near Waunfawr Estate 22 Yes
View Comments (1) T16 Glan y Dŵr 90 Yes
View Comments (1) T17 Cae Serri Road 21 Yes
Llangefni View Comments (3) T18 Land near Ty Hen 154 No
View Comments (3) T19 Former Ysgol y Bont 41 No
View Comments (5) T20 Ty'n Coed 144 No
View Comments (3) T21 Land near Ysgol y Graig 38 No
View Comments (3) T22 Land near Bro Tudur 59 No
View Comments (3) T23 Land near Coleg Menai 49 No
Blaenau Ffestiniog View Comments (2) T24 Former Caeau Chwarae 95 No
View Comments (2) T25 Land at Congl y Wal 60 No
Caernarfon View Comments (1) T26 Former Ysgol Hendre 42 No
View Comments (3) T27 Rear of Maes Gwynedd 29 No
View Comments (1) T28 Cae Phillips Road 123 Yes
Porthmadog NONE - - -
Pwllheli View Comments (8) T29 Land near Caernarfon Road 150 No
View Comments (5) T30 Cae Deiniol 14 No
View Comments (5) T31 Former Hockey Field 17 No

ii) Windfall

Additional units will be provided on suitable unallocated sites within the development boundary based upon the indicative growth level in the table below:

Settlement Indicative Windfall Provision1
Bangor 479
Amlwch 142
Holyhead 332
Llangefni 136
Blaenau Ffestiniog 118
Caernarfon 190
Porthmadog 123
Pwllheli 110

1Some units may benefit from existing planning permission in April 2014 (see Appendix 5)

No Comments 7.4.118 Explanation:

Bangor benefits from a strong strategic rail and road corridor running through North Wales connecting the key hubs as recognised in the Wales Spatial Plan. It is a strategic sub-regional retail centre and performs as cross boundary Centre providing for opportunities for small, medium and large scale employment opportunities on established and new sites; higher education and education; leisure and health facilities/ services. It has excellent public transport links with lower order settlements within and outside the Plan area.

No Comments 7.4.119 Over the Plan period a higher proportion of new development required in the Plan area will take place within, and on the edge of Bangor through completions, commitments, windfall and new allocations. Settlement boundaries will be amended to reflect the proposed development. The Centre will provide for a combination of market and affordable housing.

No Comments 7.4.120 The Strategy recognises the major role of the Urban Service Centres. They offer the good range of employment, facilities and services that serve their own population as well as their wide catchment areas. They are recognized in the Wales Spatial Plan as Primary Key Settlements either within the identified hubs, or, as in the case of Blaenau Ffestiniog, perform a key cross boundary role between two national spatial plan areas. These Centres, particularly Holyhead, have a high degree of accessibility by public transport and other sustainable modes.

No Comments 7.4.121 Over the Plan period a higher proportion of development required in the Plan area will be directed to these Centres. Most new development will take place within, and on the fringe of the Urban Service Centres and development will be delivered through completions, commitments, windfall and new allocations. Settlement boundaries will be amended to reflect the proposed development. The Centre will provide for a combination of market and affordable housing.

View Comments (11) POLICY TAI15 HOUSING IN LOCAL SERVICE CENTRES

In the following Local Service Centres:

Anglesey
Beaumaris, Benllech, Bodedern, Cemaes, Gaerwen, Llanfairpwll, Menai Bridge, Pentraeth, Rhosneigr, Valley


Gwynedd
Abermaw, Abersoch, Bethesda, Criccieth, Llanberis, Llanrug, Nefyn, Penrhyndeudraeth, Penygroes, Tywyn

Housing to meet the Plan's strategy will be delivered through:

(i) Allocations

The following sites are identified as Housing Allocations:

Centre Site Reference Number Site Name Indicative Growth Level

Permission

(Apr 2014)

Beaumaris View Comments (1) T32 Casita 35 Yes
Benllech View Comments (1) T33 Adjoining Wendon Cafe 12 No
Bodedern View Comments (1) T34 Land near Llwyn Angharad 48 No
Cemaes View Comments (10) T35 Land to the rear of Llwyn Angharad 60 No
Gaerwen NONE - - -
Llanfairpwll View Comments (1) T36 Land near Bryn Eira 30 No
View Comments (2) T37 Land near Penmynydd Road 10 Yes
Menai Bridge View Comments (1) T38 Ty Mawr 20 Yes
View Comments (1) T39 Tyddyn Mostyn 40 Yes
View Comments (1) T40 Land near Lôn Gamfa 14 No
Pentraeth NONE - - -
Rhosneigr NONE - - -
Valley View Comments (1) T41 Former Cattle Market Site 40 No
Abermaw NONE - - -
Abersoch NONE - - -
Bethesda NONE - - -
Criccieth View Comments (2) T42 Land near North Teras 34 No
Llanberis View Comments (1) T43 Land near Victoria Hotel 16 No
View Comments (2) T44 Land near Tŷ Du Road 11 Yes
Llanrug View Comments (1) T45 Church Field 10 Yes
View Comments (2) T46 Land near Rhythallt Road 6 Yes
Nefyn View Comments (1) T47 Land near Helyg 19 No
View Comments (1) T48 Former Allotments 10 Yes
Penrhyndeudraeth View Comments (1) T49 Canol Cae 31 No
View Comments (1) T50 Near former Bron Garth Hospital 46 No
View Comments (1) T51 Land near Canol Cae 31 No
Penygroes View Comments (3) T52 Land near Maes Dulyn 39 No
Tywyn View Comments (1) T53 Sŵn y Tonnau 21 Yes
View Comments (1) T54 Garreglwyd 14 Yes

(ii) Windfall


Additional units will be provided on suitable unallocated sites within the development boundary based upon the indicative growth level in the table below:

Settlement Indicative Windfall Provision1
Beaumaris 55
Benllech 38
Bodedern 9
Cemaes 18
Gaerwen 40
Llanfairpwll 35
Menai Bridge 20
Pentraeth 35
Rhosneigr 54
Valley 32
Abermaw 81
Abersoch 65
Bethesda 82
Criccieth 124
Llanberis 37
Llanrug 31
Nefyn 37
Penrhyndeudraeth 42
Penygroes 40
Tywyn 55

1 Some units may benefit from existing planning permission in April 2014 (see Appendix 5)

Development in Abersoch, Beaumaris and Rhosneigr will have to comply with Policy TAI5 Local Market Housing.

No Comments 7.4.122 Explanation:

The Strategy recognises the complementary role of the Local Service Centres, providing the essential service needs of their own population and immediate rural catchment areas as well as some employment and retail opportunities. They have a good degree of accessibility by public transport to the higher order Centres. Over the Plan period housing growth will be directed to land within or on the fringe of these Local Service Centres. Development will be delivered through completions, commitments, windfall and, where appropriate, new allocations. Settlement boundaries will be amended to reflect the proposed development. The Centres will provide for a combination of market and affordable housing, including local need.

View Comments (7) POLICY TAI16 HOUSING IN SERVICE VILLAGES

In the following Service Villages:


Anglesey
Gwalchmai, Newbrough, Llanerchymedd

Gwynedd
Bethel, Bontnewydd, Botwnnog, Chwilog, Deiniolen, Rachub, Tremadog, Y Ffor

Housing to meet the Plan's strategy will be delivered through:

(i) Allocations


The following sites are identified as Housing Allocations:

Centre Site Reference Number Site Name Indicative Growth Level

Permissions

(Apr 2014)

Gwalchmai View Comments (1) T55 Land near A5 28 No
Newborough View Comments (1) T56 Tyn Cae Estate 12 Yes
Llanerchymedd View Comments (5) T57 Land near Tyn y Fynnon 17 No
Bethel View Comments (9) T58 Land near Saron 41 No
Bontnewydd View Comments (1) T59 Land near Glanrafon Estate 26 Yes
View Comments (2) T60 Land near Glan Beuno Bridge 10 No
Botwnnog View Comments (2) T61 Land near Cefn Capel 21 No
View Comments (1) T62 Land near Pentre 11 No
Chwilog View Comments (5) T63 Land rear of Madryn Arms 18 No
View Comments (1) T64 Land near Cae Capel 20 No
Deiniolen View Comments (1) T65 Land near Pentre Helen 30 No
Rachub View Comments (2) T66 Land near Maes Bleddyn 30 No
Tremadog NONE - - -
Y Ffr View Comments (3) T67 Land near Tyn Ln 18 No
View Comments (2) T68 Land near the School 10 No
View Comments (1) T69 Land near Bro Gwystil 9 Yes

(ii) Windfall


Additional units will be provided on suitable unallocated sites within the development boundary based upon the indicative growth level in the table below:

Settlement Indicative Windfall Provision1
Gwalchmai 11
Newborough 28
Llannerchymedd 22
Bethel 4
Bontnewydd 3
Botwnnog 8
Chwilog 1
Deiniolen 7
Rachub 7
Tremadog 10
Y Ffôr 0

1 Some units may benefit from existing planning permission in April 2014 (see Appendix 5)


No Comments 7.4.123

Explanation:

The scale of proposed future development will reflect the Villages' needs in terms of the size and function and their physical and functional relationships with the higher tier Centres. It will also reflect their social character and status of the housing market. Over the Plan period a higher level of housing growth will be accommodated within the Service Villages. In Service Villages development will be delivered through completions, commitments, windfall and, where appropriate, new allocations for either a combination of market value and local need affordable housing.

View Comments (13) POLICY TAI17 HOUSING IN LOCAL, RURAL AND COASTAL VILLAGES

Proposals for housing in the following Local, Rural and Coastal Villages will be granted provided they conform to all the following criteria:

i. The proposal would satisfy the community need for housing or local need affordable housing;
ii. The proposal would help to secure the viability of the local community, and strengthen the community and linguistic character;
iii. The growth level is based on the indicative level included in table 20 and is consistent with Strategic Policy PS15.

Local Villages

Anglesey

Bethel, Bodffordd, Bryngwran, Brynsiencyn, Caergeiliog, Dwyran, Llandegfan, Llanddaniel Fab, Llanfachraeth, Llanfaethlu, Llanfechell, Llanfihangel yn Nhowyn, Llangaffo, Llangristiolus, Llanrhuddlad, Pencarneisiog, Penysarn, Rhosybol, Talwrn, Tregele

Gwynedd

Abererch, Brynrefail, Caeathro, Carmel, Cwm y Glo, Dinas (Llanwnda), Dinas Dinlle, Dolydd a Maen Coch, Efailnewydd, Garndolbenmaen, Garreg, Groeslon, Llandwrog, Llandygai, Llangybi, Llanllyfni, Llanystumdwy, Nantlle, Penisarwaun, Pentref Uchaf, Rhiwlas, Rhosgadfan, Rhostryfan, Sarn Mellteyrn, Talysarn, Tregarth, Trefor, Tudweiliog, Waunfawr, Y Fron

Coastal/ Rural Villages

Anglesey

Aberffraw, Carreglefn, Four Mile Bridge, Llanbedrgoch, Llanddona, Llanfaelog, Llangoed, Malltraeth, Moelfre, Trearddur

Gwynedd

Aberdaron, Borth y Gest, Clynnog Fawr, Corris, Edern, Fairbourne, Llanaelhaearn, Llanbedrog, Llangian, Llithfaen, Morfa Bychan, Morfa Nefyn, Mynytho, Rhoshirwaun, Sarn Bach, Y Felinheli

Proposals in Aberdaron, Moelfre, Mynytho, Llanbedrog, Sarn Bach, Trearddur, Tudweiliog and Four Mile Bridge will have to comply with policy TAI5 Local Market Housing.

View Comments (3) 7.4.124

Explanation:

To reflect the character of Local and Coastal/ Rural Villages, housing development will be limited to a scale and type to address community need for housing. More limited development will take place in these Villages to protect their character, support community need for housing or for local need affordable housing. No open market housing sites will be allocated in these types of Villages, the detailed criteria based policy will promote development of the right scale.

Table 20: Indicative Growth Level in Villages

1 Some units may benefit from existing planning permission in April 2014 (see Appendix 5)

Settlement

(Anglesey)

Indicative Windfall Provision1

1) Local Villages
Bethel 16
Bodffordd 22
Bryngwran 25
Brynsiencyn 29
Caergeiliog 20
Dwyran 26
Llandegfan 27
Llanddaniel Fab 23
Llanfachraeth 27
Llanfaethlu 12
Llanfechell 24
Llanfihangel yn Nhowyn 22
Llangaffo 19
Llangristiolus 15
Llanrhyddlad 7
Pencarnisiog 11
Penysarn 28
Rhosybol 24
Talwrn 20
Tregele 10
2) Coastal / Rural Villages
Aberffraw 20
Carreglefn 11
Pont Rhyd y Bont 17
Llanbedrgoch 11
Llanddona 20
Llanfaelog 20
Llangoed 27
Malltraeth 16
Moelfre 32
Trearddur 32

Settlement

(Gwynedd)

Indicative Windfall Provision1

1) Pentrefi Lleol
Abererch 9
Brynrefail 7
Caeathro 7
Carmel 12
Cwm y Glo 13
Dinas (Llanwnda) 8
Dinas Dinlle 5
Dolydd a Maen Coch 4
Efail Newydd 8
Garndolbenmaen 12
Garreg-Llanfrothen 10
Groeslon 13
Llandwrog 7
Llandygai 8
Llangybi 4
Llanllyfni 9
Llanystumdwy 10
Nantlle 6
Penisarwaun 8
Pentref Uchaf 4
Rhiwlas 9
Rhosgadfan 9
Rhostryfan 10
Sarn Mellteyrn 11
Talysarn 13
Tregarth 13
Trefor 13
Tudweiliog 12
Waunfawr 13
Y Fron 6
2) Coastal / Rural Villages
Aberdaron 13
Borth y Gest 10
Clynnog Fawr 10
Corris 14
Edern 12
Fairbourne 0
Llanaelhaearn 15
Llangian 4
Llanbedrog 16
Llithfaen 9
Morfa Bychan 10
Morfa Nefyn 15
Mynytho 13
Rhoshirwaun 6
Sarn Bach 4
Y Felinheli 19

View Comments (22) POLICY TAI18 HOUSING IN CLUSTERS

In Clusters named in table 21, proposals for new housing units must conform to all the following criteria:

  1. Local community need for an affordable dwelling has been proven;
  2. The site is an infill site between buildings coloured on the relevant Inset Map, or is a site directly adjacent to a coloured building;
  3. The proposal will not create an intrusive feature in the countryside, and will not introduce a fragmented development pattern, nor create a ribbon development contrary to the general development pattern of the settlement;
  4. The size of the property reflects the specific need for an affordable dwelling in terms of the size of the house in general and the number of bedrooms;
  5. Because of the more sensitive rural location, the development must utilize the natural features of the site in the best way and retain any natural features present at the peripheries of the site or on its boundary that are worth retaining;
  6. That secure mechanisms are in place to restrict the occupancy of the dwelling both on first occupation and in perpetuity to those who have a local community need for an affordable dwelling.

Development within each Cluster will be limited to a maximum of two units per Cluster for the period of the Plan.

View Comments (1) 7.4.125

Explanation:

Clusters are characterised by an extremely sensitive social character and environment as well as a limited level of services and facilities. In accordance with the intention of the Plan to maintain and strengthen local indigenous communities, this policy permits only a limited number of new dwellings to meet a local need for affordable housing (as defined) only on suitable sites. By restricting the number of sites where planning permission could be granted the number of houses to be built is limited to ensure that the rate of construction will not detrimentally affect the sensitive character (environmental and social) of the Rural Villages.

No Comments 7.4.126 Over the Plan period there will be no allocation for development within the named Clusters. Local need affordable housing units will be permitted on infill or extension plots in acceptable and sustainable locations.

No Comments 7.4.127 In some circumstances, where terraced housing or semi-detached dwellings are common, two applicants could develop semi-detached houses jointly in order to save construction and services costs.

View Comments (1) 7.4.128 The following table names the Clusters identified under this policy:

The following are the Clusters identified within the Plan:


Anglesey
Bodorgan, Bro Iarddur (Trearddur), Bryn Du, Brynminceg (Old Llandegfan), Brynrefail, Brynteg, Bwlch Gwyn, Capel Coch, Capel Mawr, Capel Parc, Carmel, Cerrigman, Cichle, Haulfre (Llangoed), Elim, Glanyrafon, Glyn Garth, Gorsaf Gaerwen, Hebron, Hendre Hywel (Pentraeth), Hermon, Llanddeusant, Llaneilian, Llanfaes, Llanfairynghornwy, Llangadwaladr, Llansadwrn, Llanynghenedl, Llynfaes, Marianglas, Mynydd Mechell, Nebo, Penygroes, Pen y Marian, Pengorffwysfa, Penlon, Penmon, Pentre Berw, Pentre Canol (Holyhead), Penygraigwen, Porth Llechhog (Bull Bay), Rhoscefnhir, Rhosmeirch, Rhostrehwfa, Bryn y Mor (Valley), Rhydwyn, Star, Traeth Coch (Red Wharf Bay), Trefor, Tyn Lon (Glan yr Afon), Tynygongl

Gwynedd
Aberdesach, Aberllefenni, Aberpwll, Bethesda Bach, Bryncir, Bryncroes, Bryn Eglwys, Bwlchtocyn, Penrhos (Caeathro), Caerhun/Waen Wen, Caapel Uchaf, Capel y Graig, Ceidio, Corris Uchaf, Crawia, Dinas (Llyn), Dinorwig, Friog, Gallt y Foel, Glasinfryn, Groeslon Waunfawr, Llanaber, Llandderfel, Llanengan, Llanfor, Llangwnadl, Llaniestyn, Llanllechid, Llannor, Llanwnda, Llwyn Hudol, Machroes, Maes Tryfan, Minffordd, Minffordd (Bangor), Mynydd Llandygai, Nebo, Pantglas, Pencaenewydd, Penmorfa, Penrhos, Pentir, Pentrefelin, Pistyll, Pontllyfni, Rhiw, Rhos Isaf, Rhoslan, Rhydyclafdy, Saron (Llanwnda), Sling, Swan, Tai'n Lon, Talwaenydd, Talybont, Tan y Coed, Treborth, Ty'n-lon, Ty'n y Lon, Waun (Penisarwaun).

No Comments 7.4.129 Inset plans are provided to identify the cohesive nature of each cluster with relevant buildings coloured to allow the assessment against the second criteria within the policy.

New Housing in the Countryside

View Comments (1) 7.4.130 Development in the open countryside will have to satisfy National Policy and TAN6 in relation to new rural enterprise dwelling or one planet development. In line with policy TAI9 in the future should there be no eligible occupier for a rural enterprise dwelling then it would be considered for occupation by those eligible for affordable dwelling.

National Development Management Policies

No Comments 7.4.131 Existing and national planning policy and guidance set out clear statements of national development management policy which should be referred to in formulating proposals and will be applied locally within the Plan area. These are therefore not repeated in the Plan as separate policies. In the interest of clarity these are:

National Development Management Policies
The following paragraphs contain statements of national development management policy which should not need to be repeated as local policy in LDPs:
Paragraph Policy Issue
9.2.13 Tandem Development
9.2.22; 9.3.6 Housing in Open Countryside
9.3.2 Housing in Vicinity of Industrial Uses
9.3.6 - 9.3.10 Rural Enterprise Dwellings
9.3.11 - 9.3.12 One Planet Development

View Comments (4) POLICY TAI19 CONVERSION OF TRADITIONAL BUILDINGS IN OPEN COUNTRYSIDE

In the open countryside the conversion of traditional buildings for residential use will be permitted when the following criteria are met:

  1. There is evidence that employment use of the building is not viable;
  2. The development provides an affordable unit for the community's local need for an affordable dwelling or the residential use is a subordinate element associated with a wider scheme for business re-use;
  3. The structure is structurally sound;
  4. No extensive alterations are required to enable the development;
  5. Any architectural characteristics of merit and traditional materials are retained and that the proposal does not lead to the loss of the original structure's character.

No Comments 7.4.132

Explanation:

The priority for traditional buildings in the open countryside is for employment use in line with Policy CYF5. In circumstances where justification is provided that the marketing undertaken for employment has been for a sufficient period of time then its conversion for an affordable dwelling to meet the local community's need could be supported.

No Comments 7.4.133 Support is given for residential use when it is part of a scheme for the re-use of a building or complex of buildings for employment purposes. For such proposals the employment element should be completed prior to any residential element. The authority may also impose a condition to tie occupation of the dwelling to the operation of the enterprise, in order to prevent it being sold separately without further application to the authority.

No Comments 7.4.134 The building needs to be structurally sound and evidence would be required to confirm this with a planning application and that the building is of sufficient size to accommodate the scheme without the need for extensive extensions. Supplementary Planning Guidance will be prepared to provide advice on the matter.

No Comments 7.4.135 Any proposals should ensure that any architectural characteristics of merit are retained and ensure that the development does not change its character e.g. through introducing a number of new door and window openings.

7.5 NATURAL AND BUILT ENVIRONMENT

CONSERVING AND ENHANCING THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT

View Comments (1) 7.5.1 Context

  • A key role of the planning system is to ensure that society's land requirements are met in ways which do not impose unnecessary constraints on development whilst ensuring that all reasonable steps are taken to safeguard or enhance the environment.
  • It is important that biodiversity and landscape considerations are taken into account at an early stage in both development plan preparation and development control.
  • The Natural Environment and Rural Communities Act 2006 places a duty on every public authority, in exercising its functions, to have regard, so far as is consistent with the proper exercise of those functions, to the purpose of conserving biodiversity.
  • Both Councils have prepared Local Biodiversity Action Plans.
  • The planning system has an important part to play in meeting biodiversity objectives by promoting approaches to development which create new opportunities to enhance biodiversity, prevent biodiversity losses, or compensate for losses where damage is unavoidable.
  • Local authorities have a statutory duty to have regard to the Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty's (AONB) purposes, which is the conservation and enhancement of their natural beauty.
  • The duty to have regard to National Park and AONB purposes applies to activities affecting these areas, whether those activities lie within or outside the designated areas.

View Comments (1) 7.5.2

Introduction

Nature Conservation: Species of principal importance for the purpose of conserving biodiversity are covered under Section 42 (Wales) of the NERC Act (2006). In the Plan area there are many important biodiversity and geodiversity assets. There are a number of sites of international importance and designated as Special Areas of Conservation and Special Protection Areas under the EC Habitats Directive and EC Birds Directive as well as a number of Ramsar sites designated under the Ramsar Convention. There are also numerous Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs) and Regionally Important Geological and Geomorphologic Sites (RIGGs), which are areas of national importance for nature conservation and geology. A number of species within the Plan area are protected by law, which also includes provision for habitat enhancement. Some habitats and species have a local importance to the Plan area, which have been highlighted in the Local Biodiversity Action Plan. These are the sites which haven't been listed as statutory designation. However they do have a high ecological value. These are recognised as Local Wildlife Sites, which are non-statutory designations of high nature conservation value which are based on a sound formal scientific assessment. Part of Anglesey is designated as a GeoPark.

View Comments (1) 7.5.3 There are valuable biodiversity assets to be found in both the rural and urban settings of the Plan area, which are outside the formally designated areas. Vacant brownfield land can provide an ideal habitat in which wildlife can thrive. Parks, green spaces, roadside verges and rivers are examples that can cumulatively create a green/blue infrastructure network of biodiversity sites and 'corridors'/stepping stones in which wildlife can both reside and travel through. Therefore, there is a need to ensure that development within both rural and urban areas does not damage valuable habitats or encroach upon land forming part of the wider network of wildlife corridors. Trees, woodland, copse, hedgerows and traditional field boundaries such as cloddiau are important wildlife habitats as well as contributing to the character and beauty of the landscape.

View Comments (1) 7.5.4 Landscape Conservation: Covering an area that incorporates the Anglesey Coast Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and the Llyn Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, to the boundaries of the Snowdonia National Park, the Plan area has a distinctive and diverse landscape. As well as the nationally protected Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, the wider Plan area has tracts of unspoilt countryside that are locally distinctive and worthy of designation as Special Landscape Areas. The character and beauty of the landscape significantly improves the quality of life of residents, and has major social and health benefits. It is also a major attraction for those wishing to visit the area, thereby fulfilling an important role for the local economy.

No Comments 7.5.5 The LANDMAP database which has been set up by Natural Resource Wales (formerly Countryside Council of Wales) is an important resource for making sustainable decisions in relation to the landscape. The LANDMAP methodology has been used to identify Landscape Character Areas (LCAs), which have then been recognised in the Gwynedd Landscape Strategy along with the Isle of Anglesey Landscape Strategy.

No Comments 7.5.6 The former Countryside Council for Wales also commissioned a study that focussed on the visual or scenic aspect of the Welsh coastline, providing context with reference to the geological land use, historic and cultural aspects as well. This identified 50 regional seascape units covering the whole of Wales, 19 of which cover the coastline in Anglesey and Gwynedd. More recently the Isle of Anglesey County Council and Snowdonia National Park commissioned a study entitled the 'Seascape Character Areas of Snowdonia and Anglesey'. The study identifies 'Seascape Character Types', and includes a brief description and location maps for each of the 'Types' recognised. Profiles are also provided for each of the Seascape Character Area (SCAs) describing their location and context, summary description, constituent SCTs, key characteristics, cultural benefits and services, natural influences and sites, cultural influences and sites, perceptual qualities, forces for change and inherent sensitivity.

View Comments (22) STRATEGIC POLICY PS16 CONSERVING AND AND ENHANCING THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT

The Councils will manage development so as to conserve and enhance the Plan area's distinctive natural environment, countryside and coastline, and proposals that have an adverse affect on them will be refused. When considering permitting an application the Planning Authorities will ensure that they are:

  1. Safeguarding the Plan area's habitats and species, geology, history and landscapes;
  2. Protecting and enhancing sites of international, national, regional and local importance and, their settings in line with National Policy;
  3. Having regard to the relative significance of the designations in considering the weight to be attached to acknowledged interests in line with National Policy;
  4. Protecting and enhancing biodiversity within the Plan area and enhancing and/or restoring networks of natural habitats in accordance with the Local Biodiversity Action Plan and Policy AMG4;
  5. Protecting and enhancing biodiversity through networks of green/ blue infrastructure;
  6. Safeguarding internationally, nationally and locally protected species;
  7. Protecting, retaining or enhancing the local character and distinctiveness of the individual Landscape Character Areas (in line with Policy AMG2) and Seascape Character Areas (in line with Policy AMG3);
  8. Protecting, retaining or enhancing trees, hedgerows or woodland of visual, ecological, historic cultural or amenity value.

National Development Management Policies

No Comments 7.5.7 Existing legislation and national policy and guidance set out clear statements of national development management policy. These should be referred to in formulating proposals, and will be applied locally within the Plan area by the Councils in deliberations on planning applications.

No Comments 7.5.8 The following table details the statutory designations and defines the obligation of the designation:-

Statutory Nature Conservation Designations Legislation, Circulars, Regulations & Directions National Development Management Policy Obligations
Table 23: Schedule of Nature Conservation Designations

Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB)

National Parks and Access to the Countryside Act 1949

Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000

Chapter 5 of PPW

  • Measures to conserve landscape and biodiversity
  • Development management and statutory designations

Technical Advice Note 5, 'Nature Conservation and Planning'

  • There are two AONBs within the Plan area, whose boundaries are shown on the Constraints Map
  • The primary objective for designating AONBs is to conserve and enhance the natural beauty of the landscape. It is crucial that any development schemes that affect the AONB or its setting favours the safeguarding of an area's natural beauty.
  • Proposals for major development would have to satisfy 3 tests, which are:

the need for the development, in terms of national considerations, and the impact of permitting it or refusing it upon the local economy;


the cost of and scope for providing the development outside the designated area or meeting the need for it in some other way;

any detrimental effect on the environment and the landscape, and the extent to which that could be moderated.

National Parks

National Parks and Access to the Countryside Act, 1949

Environment Act 1995

Chapter 5 of PPW

  • Measures to conserve landscape and biodiversity
  • Development management and statutory designations

Technical Advice Note 5, 'Nature Conservation and Planning'

  • The statutory purposes of National Parks are to conserve and enhance their natural beauty, wildlife and cultural heritage, and promote opportunities for the public to understand and enjoy their special features.
  • A vast part of the Gwynedd Local Planning Authority area abuts Snowdonia National Park. There are also views of the Park from parts of Anglesey and vice versa. It is Snowdonia National Park's responsibility to determine planning applications within the National Park; however development within the Gwynedd Local Planning Authority area or parts of Anglesey could have an impact on the setting of the National Park. Within these areas, Councils must give consideration to the National Park and the special natural characteristics that justify its status.
  • Proposals for major development would have to satisfy 3 tests, which are:

the need for the development, in terms of national considerations, and the impact of permitting it or refusing it upon the local economy;


the cost of and scope for providing the development outside the designated area or meeting the need for it in some other way;

any detrimental effect on the environment and the landscape, and the extent to which that could be moderated.

European Designated Sites

Council Directive on the Conservation of Natural Habitats and of Wild Fauna and Flora 1992

Council Directive on the Conservation of Wild Birds 1979

Implementation in the Community of the Convention of International Trade in Endangered Species of wild Fauna and Flora (CITES)

European Parliament and Council Directive on Environmental Liability with regard to the prevention and remedy of environmental damage 2004

Convention on Biological Diversity 1992

The Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2010 (as amended 2011)

Chapter 5 of PPW

  • Measures to conserve landscape and biodiversity
  • Development management and statutory designations

Technical Advice Note 5, 'Nature Conservation and Planning'

Special Area of Conservation (SAC)

  • An area which has been given special protection under the European Union's Habitats Directive. SACs provide increased protection to a variety of wild animals, plants and habitats and are a vital part of global efforts to conserve the world's biodiversity.
  • There are 19 SACs that lie partly or wholly within the Plan area, which are shown on the Constraints Map and listed in Appendix 7 of the Plan.

Special Protection Area (SPA)

  • Area of land, water or sea which has been identified as being of international importance for the breeding, feeding, wintering or the migration of rare and vulnerable species of birds found within the European Union .
  • There are 9 SPAs that lie partly or wholly within the Plan area, which are shown on the Constraints Map and listed in Appendix 7 of the Plan

Ramsar Sites

  • Ramsar sites are wetlands of international importance, designated under the Ramsar Convention.
  • There are 1 RAMSAR sites that lie partly or wholly within the Plan area, which are shown on the Constraints Map and listed in Appendix 7 of the Plan

The above are known as Natura 2000 sites.

The Habitats Directive requires that development proposals likely to have a significant effect on a European site are subject to an Appropriate Assessment.

The Councils must ensure that international responsibilities and obligations for conservation are fully met, and that, consistent with the objectives of the designation, statutorily designated sites are protected from damage and deterioration, with their important features conserved by appropriate management.

UK Designated Sites

Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981


Protection of Badgers Act 1992


Wild Mammals Protection Act 1996

Deer Act 1991


Conservation of Seals Act 1970


Natural Environment and Rural Communities Act 2006

Chapter 5 of PPW

  • Measures to conserve landscape and biodiversity
  • Development management and statutory designations

Technical Advice Note 5, 'Nature Conservation and Planning'

Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI)
  • The purpose of SSSIs is to safeguard, for present and future generations, the quality, diversity and geographic range of habitats, species and geological features.
  • There are 144 SSSI sites that lie partly or wholly within the Plan area, which are shown on the Constraints Map and listed in Appendix 7 of the Plan
  • There is a presumption against development likely to damage a SSSI. Before authorising operations likely to damage any of the notified features on a SSSI, local planning authorities must give notice of the proposed operations to Natural Resources Wales, and must take its advice into account in deciding whether to grant planning permission and in attaching planning conditions
National Nature Reserve (NNR)
  • NNRs were initially established to protect sensitive features and to provide 'outdoor laboratories' for research. Their purpose has widened since those early days. As well as managing some of our most pristine habitats, our rarest species and our most significant geology.
  • There are 8 NNR sites that lie partly or wholly within the Plan area, which are shown on the Constraints Proposals Map and listed in Appendix 7 of the Plan

View Comments (17) POLICY AMG1 SPECIAL LANDSCAPE AREAS

When considering proposals within Special Landscape Areas (SLA) as identified by the proposals map and listed below, there will be a need to appropriately consider the scale and nature of the development thus ensuring that there is no detrimental impact on the landscape. The development should aim to add to the historic, visual, geographical, ecological and cultural features of the SLA.


Proposals should address and coincide with the prepared 'Statement of Significance'.


Where there are reasonable grounds to suggest that proposals may result in a significant adverse impact on the SLA (either located within or directly outside) the Council will require a Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment in order to further consider the impact of the development on the designated area.


In exceptional circumstances, where development is necessary and could result in significant impact on the landscape, appropriate mitigation and compensation measures should be provided.

View Comments (1) 7.5.9

Explanation:

Protecting the natural landscape is extremely important; however there are some areas of Gwynedd and Anglesey with special features meaning that it is appropriate for them to be afforded additional protection. These areas have been identified as Special Landscape Areas (SLAs). SLA is a non-statutory designation based on LANDMAP. LANDMAP, developed by Natural Resources Wales (formerly the Countryside Council for Wales) is a landscape resource that is based on a Geographical Information System where the features and characteristics of the landscape and influences on the landscape are recorded and evaluated to form a data set that is consistent on a national level.

View Comments (2) 7.5.10 The aim of the SLA protection is to ensure that any development proposal gives consideration to maintaining, enhancing or restoring the recognised character and quality of the areas. There will be a need to demonstrate a good standard of design, location and landscaping. 16 SLAs have been identified for Gwynedd and Anglesey as follows:-

Table 24: Schedule of SLAs
GWYNEDD 01: Western Llŷn MÔN 11: Malltraeth Marsh and Surrounds
02: Porthmadog & Tremadog Bay 12: Parciau Estate Lands
03: Glaslyn & Dwyryd Estuary Landscapes 13: Parys Mountain and Slopes
04: Penllyn 14: Mynydd Mechell and Surrounds
05: Corris 15: Beaumaris Wooded Slopes and Llangoed Vale
06: Barmouth Bay 16: Southern Anglesey Estate Lands
07: North Western Fringes of Snowdonia
08: Foryd Bay
09: Menai
10: Bangor Mountain

View Comments (1) 7.5.11 A 'Statement of Significance' has been prepared for each of the SLAs. This statement should be referred to when considering development proposals within the SLAs. In order to define the new SLAs a review was undertaken of the previous SLAs with the aim of ensuring that there was justification for their special protection. It is possible to examine the document which explains how SLAs are defined along with the 'Statement of Significance' by contacting the Joint Planning Policy Unit.

View Comments (8) POLICY AMG2 PROTECTING AND ENHANCING FEATURES AND QUALITIES THAT ARE UNIQUE TO THE LOCAL LANDSCAPE CHARACTER

Proposals that would have an adverse impact upon landscape character as defined by the Landscape Character Areas included within the current Landscape Strategy for the relevant authority, must demonstrate through a landscape assessment how landscape character has influenced the design, scale, nature and site selection of the development.
A proposal will be granted provided that it doesn't have an adverse impact upon features and qualities which are unique to the local landscape in terms of visual, historic, geological, ecological or cultural aspects. Measures should be taken to ensure that the development doesn't:-

  1. Cause significant adverse impact to the character of the built or natural landscape;
  2. Fail to harmonise with, or enhance the landform and landscape;
  3. Lose or fails to incorporate traditional features, patterns, structures and layout of settlements and landscape of both the built and natural environment.

Particular emphasis will be given to the landscapes identified through the Landscape Character Areas as being of high and outstanding quality because of a certain landscape quality or a combination of qualities. Additional consideration will also be given to developments which directly affect the landscape character and setting of the AONBs or the National Park.

View Comments (1) 7.5.12 Explanation:

Protecting, conserving and enhancing the unique landscape features and character of the plan area are essential for maintaining the unique scenery and sense of place. Although protection is afforded to some of the features in question (e.g. trees and hedgerows, through Tree Preservation Orders and the Hedgerows Regulations), some of the other features that are not afforded protection have features that are unique to the local landscape. These contribute to local distinctiveness, and where appropriate should be protected.

No Comments 7.5.13 The aim of this policy is to protect the range of various landscape features within the Plan area which have been recognised within the Landscape Character Areas. Further information regarding the Landscape Character Areas can be found within the relevant Landscape Strategy for each authority, and in the relevant LANDMAP data. Both sources of information should be taken into consideration when considering the impact of development upon landscape character.

No Comments 7.3.14 Other relevant studies should also be taken into consideration as part of the evidence gathering process regarding landscape to ensure that the development proposals are informed by and reflect the distinctive character, qualities and sensitivity of the area. Other studies, include the Landscape Capacity and Sensitivity Study (2014).

View Comments (2) POLICY AMG3 COASTAL PROTECTION

In considering proposals on the coast, including the Heritage Coast, there will be a need to ensure that the proposal conforms to the following criteria:-

  1. The development due to it's nature must be located on the coast or in open estuaries or nearby and that there is an overriding economic and social benefit from the development
  2. They do not cause unacceptable harm to:

  1. water quality
  2. public access considerations
  3. the built environment or the landscape or seascape character
  4. the area's biodiversity interests (including features of European Protected Areas such as marine Special Areas of Conservation and Special Protected Areas) due to their location, scale, form, appearance, materials, noise or emissions or due to an unacceptable increase in traffic.

  1. Priority is given to locations with a close visual connection to current buildings or existing structures.
  2. There are no suitable alternative locations on the coast that have been developed.
  3. That the development is consistent with other policies within the Plan including Policy ARNA1.

No Comments 7.5.15 Explanation:

The Plan area's coast is a unique and important resource environmentally, socially and economically. National planning policy encourages local planning authorities to maintain, enhance and protect the coast, especially the areas which have been designated as Heritage Coast. Managing development is important for the future as a means of supporting the Heritage Coast and it's setting as well as generally maintaining views into and out of the coastline.

No Comments 7.5.16 It is recognised that some activities must be located on or near the coast or estuaries, for example, suitable schemes for defending the coastline, fishing needs or developments related to leisure activities that do not affect the conservation value of the coast itself. The Local Planning Authority will assess proposals to locate development on the coast or estuaries in order to ensure that this is the only location suitable for them and that they will not harm the natural resources of the coast, or its qualities and visitor experience to it. It is expected that development proposals on or near the coast will refer to the Landscape Character Assessment and the Seascape Assessment (local and regional). Biodiversity issues and the means of protecting sites and habitats are set out in General Policy and Policy AMG4.

No Comments 7.5.17 Within the coastal areas that are protected as a Heritage Coast an emphasis will be placed on protecting and promoting the natural beauty of the coast, facilitating access for the public and public appreciation, maintaining the environmental quality of the waterfronts and promoting sustainable types of social and economic development.

No Comments 7.5.18 The whole of the Plan area's coastline has been assessed by the Shoreline Management Plan, which shows that physical circumstances can limit the scope of possible coastal development, for example, flooding, erosion and unstable land. National planning policy clearly states that the planning system should reduce the threats due to coastal change by avoiding inappropriate development in fragile areas or increase the effects of physical coastal changes. Therefore the Plan will control development in areas where these risks are identified in accordance with Policy ARNA1.

View Comments (9) POLICY AMG4 LOCAL BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION

Proposals should protect and enhance biodiversity that has been identified as being important to the local area. Proposals will be refused unless they can conform to all the following criteria:-

  1. Ensure that there is no other satisfactory alternative site for the development.
  2. Ensure that the development is in a suitable location, avoiding locations that are of international, national and local biodiversity importance.
  3. Provide measures to mitigate potential detrimental impact.
  4. Protect and enhance the nature conservation features.
  5. Create, improve and manage wildlife habitats and natural landscape including wildlife corridors and stepping stones.
  6. Contribute towards achieving the targets set in the Local Biodiversity Action Plan.

Where necessary, an Ecological Assessment which highlights the relevant biodiversity issues should be included with the planning application.


When a development can't protect or enhance biodiversity and the need for the development outweighs the importance of the site for nature conservation it should be clearly shown that there is no other appropriate location available and there are appropriate mitigation or compensation measures in place.

No Comments 7.5.19 Explanation:

The aim of this policy is to ensure protection and improvements to local biodiversity. In particular, this policy will be a way of protecting those species and habitats that have been identified within the Gwynedd and Anglesey Local Biodiversity Action Plans.

No Comments 7.5.20 Section 40 of the Natural Environment and Rural Communities Act 2006 ("the NERC Act") places a duty on all public authorities to consider the task of protecting biodiversity, provided this is consistent with exercising those functions appropriately.

No Comments 7.5.21 Any application that may have a detrimental impact on protected species must be supported by an Ecological Assessment undertaken by a qualified professional. It will be essential to ensure that any survey related to the Ecological Assessment is undertaken at appropriate times of the year. When determining the need to carry out an Ecological Assessment there will be a number of qualifying factors that will require consideration, including scale, type and location of the development. Further guidance relating to the requirement for an Ecological Assessment can be received by contacting the relevant Biodiversity Officer for the Authority. Supplementary Planning Guidance will be published to provide advice on the matter.

No Comments 7.5.22 In considering applications that could have a detrimental effect on locally important species and habitats, consideration will be given to the potential impact of the development could have on the conservation status of the species and habitat. The Council can impose planning conditions as a way of overcoming and mitigating any possible negative effect that could arise from the development should permission be granted.

No Comments 7.5.23 In exceptional circumstances mitigation measures can include appropriate measures to reduce the levels of disturbance, the creation of other appropriate habitats to maintain and improve the population that is affected or to facilitate the survival of individual species.

View Comments (7) POLICY AMG5 PROTECTING SITES OF REGIONAL OR LOCAL SIGNIFICANCE

Proposals that are likely to cause direct or indirect significant harm to Local Nature Reserves (LNR), Wildlife Sites (WS) or regionally important geological / geomorphologic sites (RIGS) will be refused, unless it can be proven that there is an overriding social, environmental and/or economic need for the development, and that there is no other suitable site that would avoid having a detrimental impact on sites of nature conservation value and local geological importance.


When development is granted, assurance will be required that there are appropriate mitigation measures in place. It will be possible to use planning conditions and/or obligations in order to safeguard the site's biodiversity and geological importance.

No Comments 7.5.24 Explanation:

Local Nature Reserves, Wildlife Sites and Regionally Important Geological/Geomorphologic Sites can contain a variety of nature conservation qualities and features of geological value, including a range of habitats that support a range of species.

No Comments 7.5.25 Planning applications that affect sites that are important to local nature conservation are expected to include an Ecological Assessment of the site. It will be essential for the Assessment to be undertaken by a qualified professional, and to include an assessment of any possible mitigation measures. Supplementary Planning Guidance will be published to provide advice on the matter.

No Comments 7.5.26 In the case of a development that would affect a RIGS site, if it is deemed that the development is more important than the significance of the site and that it is not practical to include measures to reduce the effect on the site, the developer must make suitable arrangements for the recording of the site by an individual who is experienced in the field before commencing the work and as the work progresses. It will be possible to include planning conditions or obligations to ensure this.

No Comments 7.5.27 Where it can be proven that there is an overriding social/environmental and/or economic need for the development and where it can be proved that there is no other suitable site for the development, it must be ensured that there are appropriate mitigation measures such as "offsetting" should only be considered as a last resort. These could include creating new habitats for species or improving/managing current habitats in order to ensure that there is no deterioration in the nature conservation value of the local area.

PRESERVING AND ENHANCING HERITAGE ASSETS

View Comments (1) 7.5.28

Context

It is important that heritage assets - encompassing archaeology and ancient monuments, listed buildings, conservation areas and historic parks, gardens and landscapes - are preserved.
Local Planning Authorities (LPA's) have an important role in securing the preservation of the historic environment while ensuring that it accommodates and remains responsive to present day needs.

No Comments 7.5.29

Introduction

The Councils have a duty in exercising their planning functions to preserve and enhance the significance, character and appearance of the Plan area's cultural and historic environment. It is recognised that the historic environment contributes to the enjoyment of life in the Plan area, provides a unique sense of identity and is a valuable economic asset. The term 'heritage assets' includes not only archaeological sites, historic buildings, settlements and also the wider historic landscape together with locally distinctive, valued and important buildings, areas and features.

View Comments (1) 7.5.30 The Councils will be collaborating with partners and stakeholders to preserve and enhance heritage assets through heritage and regeneration initiatives. This will include preserving and enhancing the visual character of the townscape along with the setting of the settlement.

View Comments (9) STRATEGIC POLICY PS17 PRESERVING AND ENHANCING HERITAGE ASSETS

In seeking to support the wider economic and social needs of the Plan area, the Local Planning Authorities will preserve and, where appropriate, enhance its unique heritage assets.

Proposals that will preserve and enhance the following heritage assets, their setting and significant views into and out of the building/area will be granted:

  1. Scheduled Ancient Monuments and other areas of archaeological importance (in line with Policy AT4).
  2. Listed Buildings and their curtilages.
  3. Conservation Areas (in line with Policy AT1).
  4. Beaumaris Castle and Caernarfon Castle and Town Walls World Heritage Sites (in line with Policy AT1).
  5. Candidate World Heritage Sites.
  6. Registered Historic Landscapes, Parks and Gardens (in line with Policy AT1).
  7. Buildings of architectural/ historic/ cultural merit which are not designated or protected (in line with Policy AT3).

National Development Management Policies

View Comments (3) 7.5.31 Existing legislation and national planning policy and guidance set out clear statements of national development management policy which should be referred to in formulating proposals and will be applied locally within the Plan area. These are therefore not repeated in the Plan as separate policies. In the interest of clarity these are:

Legislation, Circulars, Regulations & Directions National Development Management Policy
Obligations

Scheduled Ancient Monuments

'Planning and the Historic Environment: Archaeology'
Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979

Ancient Monuments (Class Consents) Order 1994 (SI 1994/1381)

Welsh Office Circular 60/96, 'Planning and the Historic Environment: Archaeology'

Chapter 6 of PPW:

  • Financing archaeological works
  • Ancient monuments and archaeological remains
  • Archaeological investigation before development commences

  • Any proposal to carry out works at a scheduled ancient monument which would have the effect of demolishing, destroying, damaging, removing ,repairing, altering, adding to, flooding, or covering up a monument must be the subject of an application for scheduled monument consent.
  • An application for scheduled monument consent also has to be made for works which may be beneficial to the monument, such as consolidating masonry, or for conducting a research excavation.
  • It is an offence to carry out such works at the site of a scheduled ancient monument without first obtaining scheduled monument consent.

Scheduled Ancient Monuments are shown on the Constraints Map

Listed Buildings & Conservation Areas

Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990

Welsh Office Circular 61/96, 'Planning and the Historic Environment: Historic Buildings and Conservation Areas

1/98: Planning and the Historic Environment: Directions by the Secretary of State for Wales

Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Wales) Regulations 2012


Chapter 6 of PPW:

  • Preservation of listed buildings and optimum viable use
  • Proposals affecting a listed building or its setting
  • Consent to demolish a listed building/use of conditions
  • Conservation Areas and assessments
  • Conservation Area consent: need to preserve or enhance character
  • Conservation Area consent considerations
  • Advertisements in Conservation Areas
  • 'Conservation Principles for the Sustainable Management of the Historic Environment in Wales' published by CADW

Listed Buildings:

  • Listing means that when a building is included on a Listed building Register, it is necessary to apply for 'Listed Building consent' from the LPA before carrying out works which would affect the building's character as a building of special architectural or historic interest
  • Under Section 9 of the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 it is a criminal offence to demolish a listed building, or alter or extend such a building in a way which would affect its character, without consent, and the penalties for this can be heavy.

Listed building Consent is required for:

  • demolition or any work which is the opinion of the Authority, affects the character of a listed building.
  • works of maintenance or repair do not usually need consent provided that the materials, detailing, and finished effect match the original work exactly.


Conservation Areas:

  • There is a duty on LPA's in exercising its planning functions to 'pay special attention to the desirability of preserving or enhancing the character or appearance of the area' (Section 72 of the 1990 Act).
  • Conservation area consent is required for the demolition of unlisted buildings in the area (Section 74 of the 1990 Act).
  • Anyone wishing to carry out works to a tree, which would require consent if there were a tree preservation order in place, must give six weeks' notice of their intention to do so to the local authority.

There is no statutory requirement to have regard to the provisions of the development plan when considering applications for listed building or conservation area consent

In terms of associated planning applications for changes of use of a listed building or development that affects the setting of a listed building the Council will expect applicants to demonstrate how their proposals have been arrived at in the context of the PPW aim to identify the optimum viable use that is compatible with the character and setting of the listed building, or takes full account of the setting of any listed building in the vicinity and that developers demonstrate that the setting will not be harmed.

Conservation Areas are shown on the Constraints Map and listed in Appendix 7 of the Plan

World Heritage Sites

Welsh Office Circular 61/96 , 'Planning and the Historic Environment: Historic Buildings and Conservation Areas

Chapter 6 of PPW:

World Heritage Sites are a material consideration to be taken into account by local planning authorities in the determination of planning applications

The impact of development proposals on both the sites and their settings should be carefully considered

World Heritage Sites are shown on the Constraints Map and listed in Appendix 7 of the Plan

Registered Historic Landscapes, Parks and Gardens

Chapter 6 PPW:

  • Register of Landscape Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest in Wales
  • Guide to Good Practice on using the Register of Landscapes of Historic Interest in Wales published by CADW

Nid oes gan y tirweddau, parciau a gerddi sydd ar y rhestr warchodaeth statudol, ond fe ddylid rhoi ystyriaeth iddynt pan fo cynigion datblygu yn cael ei wneud a fydd yn cael effaith uniongyrchol arnynt neu ar y gosodiad.

Mae'r Tirweddau, Parciau a Gerddi o Ddiddordeb Hanesyddol yn cael eu dangos ar y Map Cyfyngiadau ac wedi ei rhestru yn Atodiad 7 o'r Cynllun.

View Comments (1) 7.5.32 It is recommended that developers take the above into account when formulating development proposals.

No Comments 7.5.33 Strategic Policy PS17 builds on national planning policy and guidance and reflects the importance that is attached within the Plan towards preserving or enhancing the heritage integrity of the Plan area. In certain instances the need for preservation will outweigh the benefit of development. More often, a heritage asset will be an opportunity for retaining local identity through the repair and reuse of heritage assets and strengthening this through respect for local characteristics of design, for the interpretation of hidden heritage assets, or for the enhancement of the characteristic natural environment. All new developments within historic areas should be designed in such a way as to preserve and enhance their special character.

View Comments (1) 7.5.34 Strategic Policy PS17 also recognises the importance, where appropriate, of protecting the setting of a heritage asset. Considerable damage can be done to the architectural or historic interest of an asset if the development is insensitive in design, scale or positioning. The setting of an asset is often an essential feature of its character. The setting may be limited to the immediate surroundings, but it can extend for a considerable distance. Strategic Policy PS17 requires that development proposals take full account of the setting of any heritage asset and that developers demonstrate that the setting will not be harmed.

View Comments (2) 7.5.35 Strategic Policy PS 17 also affords protection to Candidate World Heritage Sites. Presently there is only one 'Candidate' site namely the 'Candidate North Wales Slate Industry World Heritage Site'. To ensure suitable recognition for the slate industry's significance to the development of mankind, its enduring cultural, environmental and technological legacy, and with a view to maximising the current and future contribution of the industry to the Gwynedd economy, in June 2010, on behalf of a range of stakeholders, GC successfully presented an application to the DCMS for the industry to be included on the UK's list of tentative World Heritage Sites to be submitted to UNESCO. The UK's tentative list was formally presented to UNESCO in January 2012. Gwynedd Council and its partners are currently preparing the required documentation to support a nomination for the Slate Industry World Heritage Site, aiming to further to clarify the potential scale and scope of the Slate Industry World Heritage Site. Any development which impairs on the integrity or authenticity of a site as a 'Candidate' World Heritage Site' of 'Outstanding Universal Value' will not be approved.

No Comments Policy AT1 CONSERVATION AREAS, WORLD HERITAGE SITES AND REGISTERED HISTORIC LANDSCAPES, PARKS AND GARDENS

Proposals within or affecting the setting and/ or significant views into and out of Conservation Areas, World Heritage Sites and Registered Historic Landscapes, Parks and Gardens shown on the Constraints Map must, where appropriate, have regard to:

  1. Adopted Conservation Area Character Appraisals, Conservation Area Plans and Delivery Strategies.
  2. World Heritage Site Management Plans.
  3. The Register of Landscape, Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest in Wales.
  4. Other detailed assessments adopted by the Local Planning Authority.

Development proposals should be supported by a Heritage Impact Assessment, where appropriate.

No Comments 7.5.36

Explanation:

This policy aims to ensure that the findings of detailed assessment documents are fully taken into account when considering development proposals. Each detailed assessment document, e.g. Conservation Area Character Appraisals, will provide a clear and agreed definition of those features that constitute the special character, appearance and historic value of an area. These detailed assessment documents will carry significant weight in determining planning applications.

View Comments (1) 7.5.37 A Heritage Impact Assessment should provide the Local Planning Authority with enough information to adequately understand the impact of the proposals on the significance of any heritage assets affected.

No Comments 7.5.38 A Heritage Impact Assessment will always be required for the following designated heritage assets:

  1. Listed buildings and curtilages.
  2. Planning permission applications for sites within the setting of a listed building.
  3. Planning permission applications for sites/buildings in or within the setting of conservation areas.
  4. Planning permission applications for sites within the setting of a scheduled ancient monument.
  5. Planning permission applications for sites in or within the setting of registered parks and gardens.
  6. Conservation area consent applications.

No Comments 7.5.39 The Heritage Impact Assessment may form part of the Design and Access Statement but the 'Statement' is not a substitute for an 'Assessment'. The level of information provided should be appropriate and proportionate to the significance of the heritage asset, and the potential impact of the proposals upon that significance. Carrying out a pre-application meeting with relevant officers in the Council will ensure that heritage assets are identified at the earliest stage. Supplementary Planning Guidance will be published to provide advice on the matter.

No Comments POLICY AT2 ENABLING DEVELOPMENT

Enabling development which aims to secure the preservation and/or alternative use of a listed building or a building which makes a significant positive contribution to the character of a conservation area or a Registered Historic Landscape, Park and Garden will only be granted provided all the following criteria can be met:

  1. It will not materially harm the heritage values of the heritage asset or its setting
  2. It avoids detrimental fragmentation of management of the historic asset.
  3. It will secure the long-term future of the heritage asset and, where applicable, its continued use for a sympathetic purpose.
  4. It is necessary to resolve problems arising from the inherent needs of the heritage asset, rather than the circumstances of the present owner, or the purchase price paid.
  5. Sufficient subsidy is not available from any other source.
  6. It is demonstrated that the amount of enabling development is the minimum necessary to secure the future of the heritage asset, and that its form minimizes harm to other public interests.
  7. The public benefit of securing the future of the heritage asset through such enabling development decisively outweighs the disbenefits of breaching other public policies.

Proposals will be subject to an agreed programme of works. The condition or state of restoration of the building or feature must be in accordance with the programme of works prior to the enabling developments occupation.

No Comments 7.5.40

Explanation:

Enabling development is that which may not otherwise be permitted, but which is used to fund works to secure the future of a vulnerable historic buildings or features of national or local importance. Such buildings or features may also include important buildings etc. within Conservation Areas and/or a Registered Historic Landscape, Park and Garden.

No Comments 7.5.41 Enabling development is an exception to normal policies and should only be used as a last resort in genuinely exceptional circumstances ensure that a listed building to preserve historic buildings or features from dilapidation and/or disuse.

No Comments 7.5.42 Development proposals should be considered and formulated with an understanding of the design and significance of buildings and their settings, parks and gardens and their relationship with the historic buildings that are located within and adjacent to them. For example preserving key views and vistas to the building, and views from the building to its surroundings will be important determining considerations. Development proposals will also have to demonstrate how they have considered the guidance contained in 'Conservation Principles for the Sustainable Management of the Historic Environment in Wales' published by CADW.

View Comments (3) POLICY AT3 LOCALLY OR REGIONALLY SIGNIFICANT NON-DESIGNATED HERITAGE ASSETS

Proposals will be required to conserve and seek opportunities to enhance buildings, structures and areas of locally or regionally significant non-designated heritage assets, for example:

  1. The sympathetic re-use of redundant and under-used historic buildings and areas which are consistent with their conservation; and
  2. Opportunities to enhance the Plan area's historic public realm by ensuring that all development, including transport and infrastructure work, is sympathetic to the historic environment.

Distinctive elements of the Plan area's historic environment, which creates a sense of local character and identity and variation across the Plan area, will be conserved, enhanced and their potential to contribute towards wider social, cultural, economic and environmental benefits will be exploited.

View Comments (1) 7.5.43 Explanation:

There are a significant number of historic assets whilst not meeting the very special criteria to merit inclusion on a statutory list are, nevertheless, of value to the identity of the Plan area due to their contribution to local built character and/ or social or economic associations. For example, these include*:

  1. the individual and distinctive character and appearance of the Plan area's historic market towns and villages
  2. historic buildings and structures related to the quarrying industries
  3. historic rural structures
  4. ecclesiastical sites including churches, chapels and monuments
  5. the transport network heritage

*(this list is not exhaustive)

No Comments 7.5.44 Whilst it would be inappropriate to afford these 'assets' the same level of protection as those that have been formally designated, they are still worthy of retention for their contribution to local character and identity. Consequently Policy AT3 will ensure that full consideration is given to the conservation and continued use of such buildings as part of the protection and enhancement of the special identity of the Plan area.

View Comments (3) POLICY AT4 PROTECTION OF NON-DESIGNATED ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES

Proposals which may affect sites that are of potential national archaeological importance or are of acknowledged local heritage importance including sites of industrial archaeology that are not scheduled will:

  1. Be assessed in terms of the intrinsic importance of the 'site' and the potential extent of harm.
  2. Require, where appropriate, either an archaeological assessments and/ or field evaluation by an archaeological body or a professionally qualified archaeologist in order to determine the archaeological impact of the proposed development before the Planning Authority determines the application.

A proposal which affects locally important archaeological remains will only be granted if the need for the development overrides the significance of the archaeological remains.

Where proposals are acceptable, a site a site a condition will be attached to the permission stating that no development should take place until an agreed programme of archaeological work has taken place.

View Comments (1) 7.5.45

Explanation:

Scheduled Ancient Monuments only form a small proportion of the total number of archaeological and historic sites. A large proportion of historic and archaeological sites, including industrial archaeological sites are not afforded statutory protection. To ensure that archaeological sites of potential national importance are not destroyed the Local Planning Authority will adopt a precautionary approach towards their protection. Consequently, where a proposed development is likely to affect a significant site on the Regional Historic Environment Record (maintained by Gwynedd Archaeological Trust), or where a site's significance has not previously been ascertained, the developer will be required to commission either an Archaeological Assessment and or an Archaeological Field Evaluation. The assessment/evaluation results must be submitted with the planning application, in addition to a plan showing how the impact of the proposal on the archaeological remains will be mitigated. The assessment/evaluation will be paid for by the prospective developer. The assessment/evaluation should be conducted by an archaeological body or a professionally qualified archaeologist. Sites which are found to be of 'national importance' will need to be assessed in accordance with Welsh Office Circular 60/96, 'Planning and the Historic Environment: Archaeology' and the relevant guidance in Planning Policy Wales.

No Comments 7.5.46 When assessing a development proposal affecting archaeological remains, which are of local importance, or their setting, consideration will be given to the following factors:

  1. significance of the remains;
  2. reasons for locating the development in this location;
  3. practicality of incorporating mitigation measures to minimise the development's impact; and safeguard the site's archaeological value.

WASTE MANAGEMENT

No Comments 7.5.47

Context

  • The National Waste Strategy Towards Zero Waste - One Wales: One Planet 2009 provides an overarching framework for the management of all types of waste, with the overall aim of reducing residual waste to zero by 2050. It is supported by a series of sector plans which details how the outcomes, targets and Policies in Towards Zero Waste are to be implemented.
  • In order to enable the North Wales authorities to achieve the targets contained within the Municipal Sector Plan and Collections Infrastructure and Market Sector Plan (CIMSP) a number of projects have been established across North Wales, including the North Wales Residual Waste Treatment Partnership Project, which seeks to divert residual waste from landfill. Also, a partnership between North wales Local Authorities and the private sector has secured the construction of anaerobic digestion plants in Gwynedd and Denbighshire to process food waste collected from households and businesses, generating renewable energy for the grid and the production of biofertiliser for use on local farmland. These projects will influence the spatial need for certain types of waste facility
  • Waste is a cross cutting issue because it is produced by all types of land use, during construction, operation and demolition. The need to change the way in which waste is dealt with is recognised in policy at all levels.
  • Anglesey and Gwynedd are rural authorities with a rich and varied landscape which includes the Llyn/Môn Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Further, the Gwynedd Local Planning Authority Area abuts the Snowdonia National Park Authority. Both authorities have limited road infrastructure serving a network of small communities and scattered settlements. Measures should be taken to encourage the sustainable transfer of waste by ensuring that there is adequate waste management provision across the authority area. The Councils aim to reduce the amount of waste disposed of through landfill sites. Due to the nature of waste management facilities it may be appropriate to locate the provision on a suitable employment site.
  • It is necessary to ensure that any proposed policies comply with the principles of Planning Policy Wales (PPW) (Edition 7, 2014). The relevant Technical Advice Note that relates to waste is TAN 21 Waste (2014).

No Comments 7.5.48

Introduction

The Plan has regard to, and is compatible with, the content of the Collections Infrastructure and Markets Sector Plan (CIMSP). One of the requirements of the Plan is to identify the types of location where waste management uses are likely to be acceptable.

View Comments (3) STRATEGIC POLICY PS18 WASTE MANAGEMENT

The Councils will seek to ensure an adequate availability of land in appropriate locations for an integrated network of waste facilities to meet regional and local obligations in accordance with the requirements of the current relevant national/regional policy/guidance. The sites and types of facilities chosen will promote a sustainable approach to waste management based on the waste hierarchy of prevention and reuse, preparation for reuse, recycling, other recovery and then disposal whilst taking into consideration the unique character of the area including the transport links and rural nature.

View Comments (3) POLICY GWA1 PROVISION OF WASTE MANAGEMENT AND RECYCLING INFRASTRUCTURE

Land and property listed below shown on the Proposals Maps, is allocated for the provision of infrastructure that could sustain or add to the range of suitable waste management facilities.

Site Name Location
Gwynedd Land at Cibyn Industrial Estate Caenarfon
Llwyn Isaf Site Clynnog Fawr
Coed Bolyn Mawr near Bethel
Penygroes Industrial Estate Penygroes
Williams & Williams Pencaenewydd
H Parry Composting Chwilog
Cookes Penrhyndeudraeth
Cefn Grainanog Llanllyfni
Bryncir Quarry Bryncir
Chwarel Ithfaen Nanhoron Nanhoron, Pwllheli
part of Peblig Caernarfon
Penrhyn Quarry Bethesda
Griffiths Crossing Caernarforn
Cefn Bychan Blaenau Ffestiniog
Manod Quarry Blaenau Ffestiniog
Anglesey Penhesgyn Penmynydd
Recycling Centre Gwalchmai
Mona Industrial Estate Mona
former Anglesey Aluminium Site Holyhead
Rhuddlan Bach Quarry Brynteg
Cae'r Glaw Quarry Gwalchmai
Nant Newydd Quarry Brynteg
Bwlch Gwyn Quarry Holland Arms

In addition to the above allocated sites, waste management and recycling infrastructure, excluding landfill and open windrow composting, may be acceptable on existing industrial estates, quarries and brownfield sites. Proposals for waste management and recycling infrastructure (which are not proposed on the above allocated sites) will be assessed on their own merit provided that there is a justifiable need for the development. The justifiable need should refer to the local need as specified within the Municipal Sector Plan and Collections Infrastructure and Markets Sector Plan (CIMSP).


Any new development must be suitable in terms of size and scale and must not have an adverse impact upon the landscape, the natural environment or the amenity and health of the local population.

Rhaid i unrhyw ddatblygiad newydd fod yn addas o ran maint a graddfa ac ni ddylai gael effaith andwyol ar y dirwedd, yr amgylchedd naturiol nac amwynder ac iechyd y boblogaeth leol.

No Comments 7.5.49

Explanation:

In order to deal with waste sustainably, it is essential that the Plan area has an adequate integrated network of waste facilities. TAN 21 aims to ensure that the right facilities are located in the right place and at the right time to meet environmental, economic and social needs.

No Comments 7.5.50 The sites have been allocated to direct developers to locations that are considered suitable for waste management and recycling facilities. The policy acknowledges that there may be other suitable sites on existing industrial estates, quarries and sites allocated for employment uses where B2 & B8 uses are acceptable in principle. The suitability of a site will depend on a variety of different factors, including the nature and scale of the waste facility and any site constraints such as flood risk, sensitive landscape and ecological sensitivity. Annex C of TAN 21 sets out the detailed planning issues which are necessary for applicants and planning authorities to have regard to whilst preparing and determining applications for waste management proposals. Any proposal that will need planning permission will be required to comply with all the other relevant policies in the Plan.

No Comments 7.5.51 In accordance with the waste hierarchy set out in TAN 21, a sustainable approach to waste management will require greater emphasis on reduction, re-use and recovery and less reliance on disposal without recovery.

No Comments 7.5.52 TAN 21 states that the resultant materials from the demolition of buildings may be recycled on site using temporary plant and machinery where it would be appropriate and would not cause a detrimental impact on neighbours in terms of noise and dust. The guidance explains that where there are longer term prospects for a sufficient and economic supply of demolition and construction waste within an appropriate catchment area, it may be appropriate to identify a permanent repository or urban quarry for this purpose. It is considered that the criteria referred to in the above policy should be used to guide the determination of planning applications for storage repositories of construction and demolition waste to avoid unnecessary landfilling of inert waste.

View Comments (1) POLICY GWA2 WASTE MANAGEMENT OUTSIDE DEVELOPMENT BOUNDARIES AND ALLOCATED SITES

Proposals for the management of waste outside development boundaries and allocated sites (in accordance with Policy GWA1) (including biodegradable waste by means of composting, including anaerobic digestion and in vessel composting) will be granted provided there is a demonstrable need for the development and that all the following criteria can be met:-

  1. Allocated sites are either unavailable or unsuitable for the proposed activity.
  2. There are no suitable sites within the development boundary.
  3. The proposal will have incorporated measures to mitigate impact upon the environment and the health and amenity of the local population.
  4. The proposal is of an appropriate scale and nature in terms of the site and its surroundings.
  5. The proposal wouldn't have an adverse impact upon the natural environment and heritage value of the area.

No Comments 7.5.53

Explanation:

The Councils consider that in some instances, some waste management facilities may be acceptable on agricultural land as part of farm diversification, particularly where it can be demonstrated that the waste is generated locally and the output is applied locally. The rural nature of the Plan area may also necessitate small scale facilities being located outside development boundaries to reflect existing transport infrastructure.

No Comments 7.5.54 Proposals within or directly adjacent to landscape designated areas such as Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, the National Park and Special Landscape Areas will be rigorously tested to ensure that there isn't any adverse impact upon the designation or it's setting.

No Comments 7.5.55
Currently there is no required need for landfill provision within the Plan area. As part of the process of monitoring the Plan, measures will be taken to review the future landfill requirement. Any proposed landfill which has proven a demonstrable need would have to conform to Policy GWA2.

View Comments (2) POLICY GWA3 LOW AND VERY LOW LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TREATMENT AND STORAGE

Facilities for the treatment storage or disposal of Low and Very Low Level radioactive waste generated on site to facilitate an existing business will be granted, provided:

  1. It is consistent with the national strategy for managing Low and Very Low Level radioactive waste and discharges and/or the decommissioning plans for the Wylfa Nuclear Power Station.
  2. The outcome of social economic and environmental health assessments justify it being dealt with on site or appropriate locations outside the main nuclear site.
  3. Facilities are sited and designed in order to minimise adverse impacts on the environment and appropriate environmental restoration measures are available.
  4. Proposals shall comply with the general considerations set out in Policy GWA1


No Comments 7.5.56

Explanation:

Within the Plan area there are businesses, research establishments as well as health care establishments which produce low and very low radioactive waste. A more notable low and very low level producer of radioactive waste is the existing nuclear power station at Wylfa which is due to stop producing electricity in 2015. The process of decommissioning will then start. The decommissioning process is likely to give rise to a large quantity of Low and Very Low Level radioactive waste.

No Comments 7.5.57 The national policy for handling such waste is to deal with them as far up the waste hierarchy as possible. However it is likely that some of this waste will need to be disposed of either on or adjacent to licensed nuclear sites or to landfill sites elsewhere.

No Comments 7.5.58 Current NRW guidance is that some Low and Very Low Level radioactive wastes may be suitable for disposal at existing non-hazardous landfill sites. Planning permission may be required for such disposal depending on the conditions attached to any existing planning permission. An appropriate consent /permit from the NRW would also be required.

No Comments 7.5.59 This Policy provides for the implementation of such facilities within the confines of the Licensed Site, This Policy applies solely to the storage of Low and Very Low Level radioactive wastes and would not permit the disposal of intermediate Level Waste at the site.

MINERALS

No Comments 7.5.60

Context

  • The overarching objective in planning for minerals is to ensure supply is managed in a sustainable way so that the best balance between environmental, economic and social considerations is struck, while making sure that the environmental and amenity impacts of any extraction are kept to a level that avoids causing demonstrable harm to environmental and amenity interests.
  • The Regional Technical Statement sets out how aggregates demand will be met in the region for a 25 year period ending in 2036 and provides a strategic basis for local development plans in the region.

No Comments 7.5.61

Introduction

The Plan area can claim major deposits of almost all main rock types including slate, limestone, coal, various igneous rocks, and sandstone including sand and gravel deposits. The Regional Technical Statement recommends that the Plan should make allocations for land based sand and gravel resources, but in accordance with Paragraph 13 of MPPW other mineral resources are to be safeguarded including high PSV Dolerite, Igneous rock, Limestone and Coal.

View Comments (6) STRATEGIC POLICY PS19 MINERALS

The Councils will contribute to regional and local demand for a continuous, secure and sustainable supply of minerals by:

  1. Safeguarding known / potential mineral resources from permanent development that would sterilize them or hinder extraction.
  2. Maintaining a 7 year land bank of Sand and Gravel and 10 year land bank of crushed rock aggregate reserves in line with national guidance.
  3. Maximise the use of secondary and recycled materials and mineral wastes.
  4. Acknowledge that where the principles of sustainable development can be achieved, the extension of existing quarries and/or new quarries is likely to be appropriate.
  5. Where there is a need for new capacity of minerals, these should come from locations of low environmental constraint and take into account transport implications.
  6. Protect maritime wharf and railhead facilities as a means of encouraging sustainable transport of aggregates.
  7. Ensuring good restoration and aftercare.
  8. Minimising potential conflict between mineral and non-mineral land uses.
  9. All Dormant and long-inactive minerals sites identified on the proposals map will be reviewed to assess their potential to contribute to the land bank and the likelihood of their re-opening. Where appropriate, Prohibition Orders will be served.

View Comments (4) POLICY MWYN1 SAFEGUARDING MINERAL RESOURCES

Mineral Safeguarding Areas have been identified and are shown on the Proposals Map to ensure that known mineral resources are safeguarded for the future. Mineral resources will be safeguarded from non-mineral development which would sterilise or hinder their extraction. Proposals for non-mineral development will only be granted within Mineral Safeguarding Areas where:-

  1. Such development would not have a significant impact on the viability of future exploitation of the mineral; or extraction of the mineral is undertaken prior to the carrying out of the development.
  2. It can be demonstrated that the need for the development outweighs the need to protect the mineral resource and, where feasible, extraction of the mineral is undertaken prior to the carrying out of the development.

No Comments 7.5.62

Explanation:

As Mineral resources are finite and are not evenly distributed, knowledge about their whereabouts is essential for making effective and sustainable planning decisions and to consider the needs of future generations. Access to mineral resources can be prevented or restricted (sterilised) by non-mineral development and the process of mineral safeguarding ensures that this does not occur unnecessarily when planning applications are determined. An effective safeguarding system requires the adoption of 'mineral safeguarding areas and the adoption of suitable policies.

No Comments 7.5.63 Anglesey and Gwynedd have metalliferous and industrial minerals such as copper, zinc, manganese, gold and silver. Significant proven deposits of copper and zinc are located in Anglesey around Parys Mountain which should be afforded particular protection from other development and to acknowledge the potential for future exploitation. Although prices have fluctuated in recent years, the world demand for these minerals has increased.

No Comments 7.5.64 A special safeguarding area or area of search would be justifiable, given the likelihood of the metalliferous resource around Parys Mountain, but also in consideration of the infrastructure requirements to recommence working.

No Comments 7.5.65 A decision to safeguard a particular mineral resource does not imply that planning permission will be granted for its working. In instances where there has need for the development outweighs the need to protect the mineral resource the developer would be encouraged to secure the prior removal of the mineral, wherever appropriate in terms of economic feasibility and environmental and other planning considerations, prior to the commencement of the development.

View Comments (3) POLICY MWYN2 MWYN2

A land bank of permitted reserves for aggregate will be maintained in accordance with national and regional guidelines

View Comments (2) 7.5.66

Explanation:

The Plan should ensure that an adequate and sustainable supply of mineral resources can be produced to meet the area's needs without compromising the environment, amenity, geodiversity, or future resource needs. In practice, ensuring an adequate and sustainable supply of aggregates will mean enabling the apportionment set out the RTS First Review to be met. National guidance requires the maintaining a 7 year land bank of Sand and Gravel and 10 year land bank of crushed rock aggregate reserves for the duration of the Plan. Where it is not possible to maintain the land bank permitted reserves, the preferred areas of search identified in the plan will serve to maintain the provision of mineral reserves.

View Comments (4) POLICY MWYN3 PREFERRED AREAS OF SEARCH

To maintain future provision to meet the demonstrated need of the industry concerned, 'Preferred Areas of Search' for future supplies of sand and gravel have been identified on the Proposals Map in the following areas:-

Cae Efa Lwyd, Penygroes
Tan y Bryn, Penygroes
Bodychain, Llanllyfni
Derwyn Fawr, Bryncir
Llecheiddior Uchaf, Bryncir

To maintain future provision to meet the demonstrated need of the industry concerned, 'Preferred Areas of Search' for future supplies of crushed rock have been identified on the Proposals Maps in the following areas:-

Rhuddlan Bach
Cae'r Glaw
Gwyndy
Bwlch Gwyn
Hengae
Nant Newydd


View Comments (1) 7.5.67

Explanation:

The above policy aims to facilitate the additional provision of sand and gravel, and crushed rock reserves to meet the identified shortfalls highlighted by the First Review of the North Wales Regional Technical Statement. By comparing existing land banks (December 2010) and the apportionment for sand and gravel and crushed rock Tables 5. 2 and 5.3 of the First Review of the North Wales Regional Technical Statement highlights a 3.7 million tonne shortfall for sand and gravel in Gwynedd and a 131 shortfall of crushed rock in Anglesey.

View Comments (1) 7.5.68 However, the Councils not have sufficient information to allocate specific sites for sand and gravel but considers that Preferred Broad Areas of Search for sand and gravel and crushed rock can be identified on information derived from BGS published data and the National Assembly for Wales commissioned report The Sand and Gravel Resources of North Wales, produced by the University of Liverpool and Enviros (2003) together with the previous study, 'Assessment of Sand and Gravel Resources in the Eastern Llyn Peninsula', undertaken by Liverpool University in 1988.

No Comments 7.5.69 The preferred areas of search identified above provide the potential for the release of new reserves which are far greater than the minimum allocation of 3 million tonnes recommended by the RTS in order to allow for the uncertainties involved, to provide choice to the Minerals Industry and to encourage local supply to minimise transport distances.

View Comments (6) POLICY MWYN4 MINERAL DEVELOPMENTS


Mineral exploration, working or extension to existing operations will be granted to maintain the Plan area's landbank of aggregates, or to meet a demonstrated need for other minerals provided the following criteria are met:

  1. There is no unacceptable harm to the amenity or health of local residents in terms of visual impact, levels of dust, noise, vibration, odour and light as a result of the operation itself or the resulting traffic movements;
  2. There is a suitable buffer between mineral development and sensitive development;
  3. There is no unacceptable harm to the stability and support of adjacent land;
  4. The development is sensitively screened and landscaped;
  5. The development will not have a significant adverse impact on sites of international, national , regional or local environmental, nature conservation, landscape and /or heritage importance;
  6. The proposal does not sterilize or otherwise prevent the working of other significant mineral deposits;
  7. The proposal does not increase the extent of active mineral working in a particular locality beyond its environmental capacity;
  8. There is no unacceptable harm to land drainage groundwater and water resources;
  9. The proposal ensures that the potential use of the resource is maximised and there is satisfactory disposal of any waste arising from the mineral operation;
  10. Where blasting is proposed, the proposal includes a scheme of blasting to demonstrate that it can be controlled to meet the conditions detailed in Mineral Technical Advice Note MTAN (Wales) 1: Aggregates, or any amendments;
  11. The proposal includes a scheme for the after use of the site and details of the restoration and aftercare required to achieve it in accordance with Policy MWYN/11;
  12. Wherever economically feasible, mineral waste or products should be transported by rail or water;

This policy is applicable to mineral exploration operations that fall outside the scope of Part 22 of the Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) Order 1995.

No Comments 7.5.70

Explanation:

Even though mineral working is a temporary use of land it can have considerable impact on the local amenity and on the environment, some impacts could render the development unacceptable. This policy seeks to identify those aspects of mineral development that require control in the interest of the local amenity and the environment. MPPW required development plans to set out the criteria that will be applied to mineral proposals and lists the issues to be addressed. Many of these issues are addressed by policies elsewhere within the Plan and National Policy. As with many other types of development, mineral operations can have a cumulative adverse impact on the environment and/or local amenity.

View Comments (3) 7.5.71 Both Councils are aware of the responsibility to protect the Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Mineral Planning Policy Wales 2000 (MPPW) supported by Minerals Technical Advice Note (Wales) 1 Aggregates 2004 make it clear that mineral development should only be allowed in Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty in exceptional circumstances. The MPPW sets out matters that should be taken into account when considering proposed mineral extraction in or close to Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

No Comments 7.5.72 The reference to environmental capacity of mineral workings on a locality should be assessed on a case by case basis, subject to the assessment of all environmental and amenity criteria, typically transportation economic, cultural, environmental and social impacts.

No Comments 7.5.73 Where reference is made to 'Suitable buffer', this relates to MTAN 1 and MTAN 2 recommended distances. These don't necessarily apply to prior extraction or exploratory, both of which would need to be considered on a case by case basis.

View Comments (1) POLICY MWYN5 LOCAL BUILDING STONE

The temporary working or reopening of small-scale mineral operations to provide traditional building materials for the repair and/or alteration of buildings or walls of architectural or historic importance or the construction of new buildings, walls or other structures on sensitive sites will be granted provided that:

  1. It is compatible with other Plan policies and that it is in the interests of building conservation, the local landscape and sustainability.
  2. Where it can be demonstrated that the need cannot be met from existing reserves/sources.

The duration should be considered on a case by case basis, taking into account the need for the mineral type concerned. The Council will attach a condition specifying end use to which the stone is to be put.

No Comments 7.5.74

Explanation:

The impact of the County's built environment on the character of the area is recognised. In many parts of area, the character of building materials plays an important part in local heritage. The Councils recognises the importance of allowing for the use of local building stone where it can be demonstrated that there is a genuine specific need that cannot be met from existing reserves/quarries.

View Comments (5) POLICY MWYN6 BUFFER ZONES AROUND MINERAL SITES

Planning applications for mineral extraction within the buffer zones identified on the Proposals Map will not normally be permitted unless a new buffer zone can be provided to reflect the minimum distances referred to in MTAN 1 : Aggregates. A notional buffer zone will be applied to all new planning applications for mineral working in accordance with the minimum distances referred to in MTAN 1 : Aggregates and MTAN 2: Coal, and in cases where the notional buffer zones can not achieve the minimum distances required, developments will be refused.

Extensions to existing mineral workings will only be granted where a suitable buffer can be maintained between mineral development and sensitive development.

Proposals for sensitive developments (in particular housing, hospitals and schools) as defined by MTAN 1 : Aggregates, within the buffer zones identified on the Proposals Map and within any notional buffer zones will be refused.

Development within a buffer zone which is less than the recommended distance will only be refused unless clear and justifiable reason is provided, and it can be demonstrated that there will be no adverse impacts or conflicts with the mineral operation.

Within the Development High Risk Areas for Coal identified on the Proposals Map, development shall only be granted within settlement boundaries where it can be demonstrated that the potential for subsidence has been the subject of geotechnical investigation and that appropriate measures to minimise the impact of subsidence by ensuring best practice to design and control of development may be applied including mitigation in the form of remediation and prior extraction where appropriate.

No Comments 7.5.75

Explanation:

Mineral Buffer zones are shown on the Proposals Map around all quarries and mineral operations, including dormant sites. The purpose of buffer zones is to protect both mineral reserves (resources with planning permission) and mineral resources from development that may sterilise them, but also to ensure the environmental effects of quarrying do not adversely affect sensitive development.

No Comments 7.5.76 The Councils recognises the benefits of establishing such zones in protecting local amenity and sensitive areas whilst maintaining the viability of approved mineral working. The buffer zones identified in the Proposals Maps have been specified in accordance with the criteria set out in MTAN 1: Aggregates. The minimum distances required are 100 metres for sand and gravel and 200 metres for hard rock quarries. For the purposes of clarity, hard rock quarries include extraction from hard rock mineral working deposits. The buffer zones identified in the Proposals Maps as well as any notional buffer zones are defined from the outer edge of the area where extraction and processing operations can take place including site haul roads.

No Comments 7.5.77 In accordance with MTAN 2, the Plan designates 'Development High Risk Areas for Coal. These are based on the Coal Authority's risk map for Anglesey which indicates the presence of 'Mine Entries with Potential Zone of Influence', south east of Llangefni in and around Pentre Berw and east of Malltraeth, where evidence of coal mining features suggest that the area has the potential for instability. It is material to consider whether a development will be affected by subsidence and to consider the acceptability of proposed mitigation measures".

View Comments (2) POLICY MWYN7 RAILHEAD AND WHARF FACILITIES

Existing and potential railhead and wharf facilities identified on the Proposals Maps will be safeguarded. Proposals that adversely affect the future availability of these facilities, or facilities for bulk mineral transportation will be refused.

No Comments 7.5.78

Explanation:

Construction aggregates are a relatively low value product with a high transport cost. Transportation in bulk to distant markets is essential to maintain low unit cost competitiveness with primary aggregates from locations nearer to the market. The Plan area has the highest level of slate waste resources in the UK, and has a leading role to play in the supply of slate waste as a secondary aggregate. Furthermore, whilst the Councils have no direct control over their development, marine aggregates are recognised as a valuable resource and provide an alternative to land-won aggregates.

No Comments 7.5.79 Bulk transportation may be achieved by rail and/or by sea. Where access to a strategic rail network is available it is important that potential bulk transport outlets for secondary aggregates be safeguarded. This can contribute to a more sustainable system of transporting minerals and reduce pressure on the existing road network.

View Comments (3) POLICY MWYN8 EXPLORATION WORKS

Proposals for exploration works will be granted for a temporary period provided satisfactory environmental safeguards are in place and full reinstatement provisions are undertaken upon completion.

View Comments (1) 7.5.80

Explanation:

Some mineral exploration works are permitted development under the Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) Order 1995 if certain conditions are complied with. In order to ensure that any proposal is viable detailed feasibility studies must be first undertaken. Such studies include exploratory works including drilling boreholes, seismic surveys and carrying out trial excavations. These operations may potentially cause pollution to the water environment, necessitating the need for full consultation with the Natural Resource Wales on any such proposals. Any subsequent mineral applications will be assessed on their own merits without prejudice to whether permission has been granted for exploratory works.

View Comments (2) POLICY MWYN9 EXPLORATION WORKS

Proposals for the development of borrow pits will be granted provided that:

  1. There are demonstrable environmental benefits to be gained
  2. They can be developed in accordance with other relevant policies of the plan and in particular other mineral policies.
  3. They are a temporary use of land linked to the timescale of the development proposed

No Comments 7.5.81

Explanation:

Borrow pits are temporary mineral workings developed to supply a particular construction project. Borrow pits can offer significant environmental benefits over mineral supply from existing reserves by reducing transport distances. They should be located near to the project and preferably supply material direct without the use of public roads. There needs to be clear environmental benefits for the use of a borrow pit and restoration works should be to a high standard.

View Comments (6) POLICY MWYN10 RESTORATION AND AFTER CARE

Applications for mineral working will be refused unless a comprehensive scheme for restoration, aftercare and after use, including details of proposed funding where necessary is included. Schemes must show progressive working and restoration unless it can be demonstrated that this is not practical without sterilising permitted reserves. The scheme should address the following matters:

  1. The existing use of the site
  2. Adjoining land uses
  3. The proposed after-use of the site
  4. The surrounding landscape character
  5. The proposed final landform
  6. The in-situ soil resource, its conservation during site working, and its use in the progressive restoration and afteruse
  7. Timetable detailing the progressive restoration of the site to a high standard
  8. The potential for natural recolonisation or for enhancing or providing wildlife habitats, agriculture, forestry, geoconservation and amenity use
  9. The potential for community benefit and employment
  10. Other policies of the Plan

View Comments (1) 7.5.82

Explanation:

Mineral sites are normally restored within the land use the categories listed above. Nearly all other after-uses will require a separate planning permission including proposals for recreation, industrial and housing. The Council must be satisfied before an application is determined that no matter how long the development, the site can be properly restored and brought back into beneficial after use within a recognisable timescale. The MTAN sets out comprehensive guidelines on how a high standard of restoration and aftercare should be achieved and how beneficial after use should be provided. The Council will not permit new mineral development without a comprehensive detailed scheme of restoration and aftercare being agreed.

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